advertisement

Free EBooks

Topics

Tags

Crazy for Cast-Ons, Part 2

Feb 12, 2010

Back in January, I did a the first installment of Crazy for Cast-Ons, where I demonstrated the Old Norwegian Cast-On. Today we're going to focus on the cable cast-on and provisional cast-ons, with some wonderful tips from Jennifer Seiffert, author of the fabulous Fearless Knitting Workbook and Interweave Knits editor Eunny Jang.

The Cable Cast-On

According to Fearless Knitting Workbook author and knitting teacher Jennifer Seiffert, the cable cast-on produces a strong and stretchy edge. It is worked with just the working yarn end, so it can be used to cast on stitches mid-project, such as at the end of a row where you have only one strand of yarn to work with. (And according to me, it's perfect for the one-row buttonhole!)

   
Step 1. Insert the right needle between the first 2 stitches on the left needle. Step 2. Wrap the yarn around the needle as if to knit, draw yarn through. Step 3. Place the new loop on the left needle to form a new stitch.

Repeat steps 1 through 3, always working between the first 2 stitches on the needle.

Provisional Cast-Ons

These cast-ons are temporary cast-ons that are used to hold stitches until you need them to add on details, such as ribbing, borders, hems, etc., or until you need them to graft them to other live stitches (such as in the free pattern at the bottom of this post!).

In the video below, Eunny teaches us three provisional cast-ons. First she shows two ways to do a simple cast-on, one using a piece of waste yarn and one using a circular needle instead of the waste yarn (I love this one!). Second, Eunny demonstrates how to so the crochet chain cast-on. Watch carefully to see where she's picking up the stitches—you have to pick up stitches through the bump on the underside of the chain or the chain won't unravel (ask me how I know; I've had to cut the chain off a couple of times). And the last demo is a crochet method where you crochet stitches directly onto the needle. This is a neat technique to have in your provisional arsenal. So here's Eunny! 



The Winding River

This is a pattern I developed, and guess what? It uses a provisional cast-on!

This is a mobius design, so you cast-on provisionally, knit the cowl, then give it a half-twist and graft the beginning and ending stitches together to make an endless circle.

So here you go: the Winding River Cowl (just one of seven patterns in our Cable Knitting free eBook).

Now go cast something on!


Featured Product

Fearless Knitting Workbook The Step-by-Step Guide to Knitting Confidence

Availability: In Stock
Was: $24.95
Sale: $19.13

Hardcover

Be fearless and knit with confidence! A workbook for the hands and minds of knitters, the Fearless Knitting Workbook will develop knitters' skills and deepen their understanding of how yarn becomes fabric.



More

Related Posts
+ Add a comment

Comments

horselove wrote
on Dec 19, 2011 10:46 AM

I love that last crochet cast-on method that's on the video! I'm making a sweater that required me to cast-on 127 stitches and the old sling-shot method was taking forever and I kept under-estimating how much yarn I needed so I'd have to start over. ): The crochet cast-on is so much faster and there's no guessing how much yarn to use. Thanks soooo much for this video! You guys are life and time savers!

lucylockett wrote
on Mar 6, 2010 11:09 AM

What I would like is a dvd of various cast on methods with explanations of the advantage of each particular method.  Is this out there anywhere?

handyme wrote
on Mar 3, 2010 6:47 PM

As I live in New zealand, our knitting patterns are printed rather diferently. The cast - on that I like using, and it saves a lot of time is,.......I was shown this by a very elderly lady, as she watched casting on in the "long tail"

Make a loop as per normal, make 2nd stitch, then from then on I put needle between the two cast on stitches. I have found this gives a very elastic finish, almost looks as if off a knitting machine. To do a ribbed cased on, start off the same, then every second stitch .....instead of putting needle throught the front , put needle thruogh the back as if to purl. I have never yet used any other way, since being taught this.Also saves yarn.  also helps when having to count all those stitchs.

indystitch wrote
on Feb 27, 2010 12:43 PM

Thank you for these, I will try one next time I need a PCO.  I am confused why books would say that long tail is more elastic than cable cast on.   I have used cable cast on for years, but recently made a cuff with long tail - just to see why I had abandoned it.  The first row of the cuff (long tail cast on) was so inelastic, I wound up frogging the whole cuff and starting again with cable cast on.  The second one was much more elastic and comfortable to pull over the hand.  

I too would love to see the video with the "bumps" for making the 1st row on a rib look really super.   I'm also looking for a great rib cast off that isn't too tight.  I always knit socks top down because mine is so tight.

indystitch wrote
on Feb 27, 2010 12:42 PM

Thank you for these, I will try one next time I need a PCO.  I am confused why books would say that long tail is more elastic than cable cast on.   I have used cable cast on for years, but recently made a cuff with long tail - just to see why I had abandoned it.  The first row of the cuff (long tail cast on) was so inelastic, I wound up froggint the whole cuff and starting again with cable cast on.  The second one was much more elastic and comfortable to pull over the hand.  

I too would love to see the video with the "bumps" for making the 1st row on a rib look really super.   I'm also looking for a great rib cast off that isn't too tight.  I always knit socks top down because mine is so tight.

on Feb 13, 2010 10:48 AM

Thank You Eunny,

Now I understand the provisional cast-on better. I too had it  so difficult to un -do it when necessary...and using a circular knitting cable that is detachable from the needles . . . wil improve it even better. . . I can use the extra cables I have and join it together in a circle with the new joiners that are (soon) available, and not have the needles in the way while I knit on to that provisionsl cast-on. . .thank you...one tip to you for the three you gave me and got me thinking of that. . . Now no need to stop and find nor to undo any provisional thread. . .

Plus your great showing  of how to use the chain stich cast-on. . . several times,  I did go into the chains wrong and that didn't work... now I see which loop to draw a cast-on from. ..  excellent video to watch...i will share it with my knitting club members... now that I have a big screen TV  I 'll  ask my husband to set it up so I can show this video to them ...

Thanks a million stitches,     Toni Nevicosi

CynthiaN wrote
on Feb 12, 2010 3:47 PM

Thanks, very helpful.

If memory serves Eunny showed a "pearl" cast-on that could be alternated with the regular long-tail cast-on to create a edge where the "bumps" matched a ribbing.  I failed to find episode...can anyone point me in the right direction?  Thanks

kronos wrote
on Feb 12, 2010 1:01 PM

Using circular needle:

I came up with a method very close to this on my own - us the cable from a set of interchangeable needles! Put the end caps on until you need to put on needle on the cable to remove the stitches. Add hint, because you are removing the stitches, not knitting onto the needle; you can use a smaller size needle.

maggiec58 wrote
on Feb 12, 2010 9:19 AM

The long tail is a cast on and the first row of knitting all in one.  If you substitute one of the other cast ons, you should knit a row before following the rest of your pattern instructions.  I love the long-tail, it's my cast on of choice.  Reasons are 1.  I can do it about a million times faster than a cable cast on

2.  Since it combines the cast on with the first row of knitting, the stiches are stable and don't change size as you insert your needle to knit the first row.

3. It gives a nice uniform edge.

Valerie@43 wrote
on Feb 12, 2010 9:04 AM

According to my knitting book, the cable cast-on has less elasticity.  But hey...it's your project, do what you like!

GabyP wrote
on Feb 12, 2010 8:25 AM

Can anyone tell me the advantage of using a long-tail cast on?  I'm about to start a sweater and the directions specify casting on using the long-tail method.  I truly dislike this cast on and much prefer a knitted cast on with the working yarn or the above-listed cable cast on.  I promise to follow the directions IF someone can tell me why it will be advantageous!