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Try Something New: Entrelac

Jul 2, 2012

    
The Cochin Shrug by Eunny Jang comes as a free download with the new workshop, Knitting Entrelac: Basics and Beyond.

Entrelac is one of my favorite knitting techniques for texture and visual interest in knitting. It produces a fabric with a woven appearance—tiers of tilting blocks appear to run over and under each other.

But the fabric is actually worked all in one piece as a series of interconnecting rectangles.

I took a class on entrelac from Anne Modesitt at Interweave Knitting Lab, and when I got home I promptly bought some beautiful Noro yarn and cast on the Lady Eleanor Scarf (shown at right) from the book Scarf Style.


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Lady Eleanor Scarf from the book Scarf Style

That beautiful yarn and the pattern has been pulled out and started, but it keeps going to the bottom of the in-progress projects pile when other things come up, like knit-alongs, chemo caps, and baby presents. I really need to pull it out and keep it out!

What got me started on the topic of entrelac is Eunny Jang's new video workshop Knitting Entrelac: Basics and Beyond. I recently got my
copy, and as always, Eunny has inspired me. She makes it look so easy, which it really is.

I love it when I learn how to knit a technique that I thought was difficult only to find out how really easy it is. And entrelac is also one of those techniques that keeps you knitting, just to see what comes next, especially when you're using a beautiful, self-striping yarn like my Noro.


Although when I look at the design that comes with the video, Eunny's Cochin Shrug (above left), I realize that entrelac is really nice in a solid color, too. The beauty and texture of the entrelac stitch stands out wonderfully in the smooth, solid yarn Eunny choose for this shrug.

Join me as I step back into my journey in entrelac—get Knitting Entrelac: Basics and Beyond today!

Cheers,


P.S. Do you have any tips about how to knit entrelac? Share them with us in the comments!

 


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Comments

Amontillada wrote
on Aug 7, 2012 7:54 PM

Noro certainly isn't the only yarn for entrelac!  Many self-striping yarns with long sections of colors will look beautiful. If you use Ravelry, do a pattern search for "entrelac"; then follow the links to the various patterns that come up and click on the Suggested Yarns tab to see some of the yarns that other knitters have used. They include yarns that are available in craft stores like Michaels and Joann's as well as others carried by yarn specialty shops.

glennajo wrote
on Jul 7, 2012 10:29 PM

Ditto what karenspils wrote on 7-2-12 about knitting backward.  It really is a time saver - also a time saver when knitting bobbles - no turning!

eiseman wrote
on Jul 7, 2012 9:46 PM

I discovered entrelac in 1994, when I was looking for something special to knit for my first grandchild.   The baby bunting turned out very successfully.  It was challenging at first but was quickly mastered even with my limited skills.   It was knit with acrylic worsted weight yarn for ease of care.

If you are looking for something with a new look and texture, try entrelac.  You won't be disappointed.

Diane Eiseman. California

I

eiseman wrote
on Jul 7, 2012 9:44 PM

I discovered entrelac in 1994, when I was looking for something special to knit for my first grandchild.   The baby bunting turned out very successfully.  It was challenging at first but was quickly mastered even with my limited skills.   It was knit with acrylic worsted weight yarn for ease of care.

If you are looking for something with a new look and texture, try entrelac.  You won't be disappointed.

Diane Eiseman. California

I

EvieDunmore wrote
on Jul 7, 2012 6:36 AM

I discovered Entrelac about 5 months ago. I finally found a name for it and managed to find a book with the directions in. I struggled to do the pattern but wasn't sure if I was doing it right. Then through the magic of computer I found a video with a full demo of how to:    

www.youtube.com/watch    

I have been teaching some ladies at our church, the art of knitting and even they have managed to pick this up easily.

I myself find it very relaxing. I have even found a book on Entrelac, just that on it's own, so interesting, so many veriations. I love this.    

cjlewis59 wrote
on Jul 6, 2012 12:16 PM

Help. I am left handed, but I can knit right handed as well. Usually I have not problem following patterns, but I just can't quite get the hang of entralac and I love a challenge. Any tips for me?

on Jul 3, 2012 8:07 AM

I see Noro yarn with entrelace a lot...does this mean it's the only yarn suited for entrelac? I hope not....

karenspils wrote
on Jul 2, 2012 12:49 PM

I was inspired by Eunny Jang's demo of Entralac last August right here on Knitting daily.  I learned to make a scarf and have ventured out to tam and 2 sweaters.

A friend, in the knit shop that I frequent, showed me how to knit backwards.  I throw and it's so easy to learn.  Now I don't have to turn my work after every 8 stitches.  That speeds up that work considerably.

on Jul 2, 2012 12:01 PM

Thanks Jay!  I went and looked around the internet for some explanation of the sliding loop technique.  It looks worth a try.  thanks again.

JolieElder wrote
on Jul 2, 2012 10:04 AM

Jay Petersen (Ravelry ID: yarnover) has done some great things with reversible and three-dimensional entrelac. When I visited him in Portland, Oregon last year, he taught me how to make reversible entrelac using Rick Mondragon's sliding loop/modular intarsia technique. It produces a flatter join than the usual ssk or k2tog, but the join looks good from both sides.

tamarque wrote
on Jul 2, 2012 9:21 AM

Actuallty it was with the written instructions from KD website which I think Eunny Jang did.  They were the best instructions on entrelac that I found.

Regarding solid colors, alternating between knit and garter stitch would bring out the pattern with a nice texture.

on Jul 2, 2012 8:23 AM

I love entrelac and have made a few pieces, but my biggest gripe, unless I am missing something, is it isn't reversible.  Is there a way to work it so it looks the same from both sides?  The scarf shown in today's entry is hard to see if we are only seeing one side or two.  I saw a lovely entrelac afghan pattern, but it definitely wasn't reversible! So, you experts out there, what are your thoughts?

Mary Hawkins wrote
on Jul 2, 2012 8:11 AM

Look at the work of Emily Lynne Wilcox - she doesn't use triangles to begin.

For example making a cushion - make one big square shape, fold the corners in envelope fashion, and your entrelac pieces will automatically be presented on the diagonal.

pasticcio wrote
on Jul 2, 2012 7:01 AM

I also love the effect of entrelac knitting and my first attempt was a hotwater bottle cover.  Unfortunately the pattern was missing a significant instruction - like how to do the side triangle so I ended up in a kerfuffle.  Then one of my knitting mags had a feature on entrelac and I followed the instructions to the letter - absolutely brilliant and if you use a self striping or random colour yarn the effects are amazing. I would encourage intermediate knitters to have a go. GOod luck.

on Jul 2, 2012 6:52 AM

Entrelac  is such a fun technique to learn but it is essential to learn how to knit backwards if you don't want to be discouraged and there are videos all over the Internet and YouTube that show you how. I love the woven look of the finished fabric.