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Wintertime Knitting

Nov 11, 2013

    
L'Acadie Cardigan by Bristol Ivy
As I mentioned the other day, I had to get my snow tires out of storage. Driving in the snow isn't my favorite thing to do, but there are so many aspects of winter in Spokane that make up for that. The sparkle of snow on a sunny, cold day. The snow lining the leafless tree branches. The twinkling lights that decorate all of our downtown streets. Fires in fireplaces. Presents wrapped with bling. These are a few of my favorite things!

I forgot one, though—the winter issue of Interweave Knits. I got my advance copy last week, just in time for my knitting group meeting. The ohhs and ahhs went round the table as my friends admired the magazine. One of the favorites was Bristol Ivy's L'Acadie Cardigan with its cabled bands, ribbed hem, and cuffs. It's fab.

    
Telluride Aran by Amy Herzog
Ojo de Dios Shawl by Vanessa Ewing
Here's Lisa Shroyer to tell you more about this issue of Knits:

Winter is Knitting Season

Handknits are tough. A well-made item in a hardy yarn can last a long time.

You may also know some knitters who are tough. In this issue, we learn from some very strong women who also happen to knit: Galina Khmeleva's story is epic, riveting, and completely intertwined with the art of lace knitting. Novelist Alice Hoffman encourages us to appreciate the moments we have, as she learned to do in the wake of a cancer diagnosis.

Véronik Avery, from the blustery stretch of eastern Canada, schools us on the thermal properties of knit-purl combinations, while Bethany Lyttle takes us back to her Canadian youth and the iconic intarsia of Mary Maxim knits, which kept her people warm.

Winter itself, in many parts of the world, requires a certain toughness of us. Requires a set jaw, an extra layer, a determined spirit as we step out of our warm abodes and into the wet, gray world. The short days, the blanketing dark, the hustle of the holidays, the rising gas bill—all of these things can make winter hard on us.

Luckily, knitters see another side of this season. For many of us, winter is blessed with sweater weather, with hats and wool socks, and with scarves that bundle us in warmth and beauty. With fireside stitching and time off from work and school to devote to (finally) finishing projects, to planning new projects, to dreaming.

    
Cerrito Cardigan by Faina Goberstein
In this collection, we bring you three storylines that hinge around a central theme of rugged-but-beautiful, tough-but-luxurious: Out by the Woodpile features henley-inspired knits with lots of knit-purl texture; Below the Mesa plants a southwestern palette on warm and wearable designs that work on ranch and ski resort alike; and finally, Crossing Country takes us back to that hardiest of stitches: the cable.

I hope you'll find warmth and inspiration in these pages. Take care of yourselves and remember to make time for the things you love; it is a vital part of the well-made life. The handmade life.

Interweave Knits is part of a handmade life, too, so get your copy today!

Sincerely,

P.S. We know many of you live in warm climates, but you still need winter knits for these chilly months. Leave a comment below and tell us about your favorite things to knit in your warmer winter!


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Comments

vikkiclingan wrote
on Nov 17, 2013 2:50 PM

A thing I like about the northern hemisphere magazines covering Winter during the 'wrong' season is that I can get started on a jumper now that will be ready to wear when it gets cold.

on Nov 17, 2013 1:29 AM

I loved my interweave knits subscription. So many techniques taught so clearly in every issue. And every sweater pattern was a work of art. But I became frustrated because the patterns always required expensive and difficult to obtain fibers that I couldn't afford. I tried but was never successful in finding alternates in which I could get the same gauge. I miss the magazine but this was a very real problem for using the patterns. Any way the magazine can make the patterns more accessible to more people? How about providing a list of easily available affordable yarns with the patterns?

on Nov 17, 2013 1:28 AM

I loved my interweave knits subscription. So many techniques taught so clearly in every issue. And every sweater pattern was a work of art. But I became frustrated because the patterns always required expensive and difficult to obtain fibers that I couldn't afford. I tried but was never successful in finding alternates in which I could get the same gauge. I miss the magazine but this was a very real problem for using the patterns. Any way the magazine can make the patterns more accessible to more people? How about providing a list of easily available affordable yarns with the patterns?