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It's Complicated, In a Good Way

Jun 4, 2014

Sometimes a serious knitting project is called for. I categorized serious knitting as intricate lace shawls, heavily cabled items, fantastic colorwork, and so forth.

    
Cataphyll Socks by Hunter Hammersen,
from Sockupied Summer 2013
Some say that knitting a basic sock pattern is serious knitting. I can see where they're coming from! All of the different parts of the sock can be a challenge, and putting them all together to construct the finished product is nothing short of a knitting miracle.

But once you have knitted a couple of pairs of socks, you can take advantage of serious knitting techniques to make some fabulous knit socks.

Take, for example, the Cataphyll Socks by Hunter Hammersen, from the summer 2013 issue of Sockupied. A cataphyll is a specialized leaf whose main job is not photosynthesis. The leaves on this sock trail down the leg then split in two; half continue down the heel while the others wind across the foot.

The Cataphyll pattern incorporates a lace pattern, traveling twisted stitches, and reverse stockinette stitch to create a wonderfully interesting pair of socks.

This is what I mean by serious knitting. It's not your typical TV knitting; you'll have to keep your eye on the ball here. But since socks are a small project, you'll most likely memorize the elements on the first sock, and perfect it on the second.
I really enjoy using somewhat complicated stitch patterns on socks. It's so much fun to wear these beautiful creations!

    
Provenenca Socks by Heatherly Walker,
from Sockupied Summer 2013
I hope you'll try the Cataphyll pattern, or some of the other patterns from Sockupied. Check out Heatherly Walker's Provenance Socks, too. Serious colorwork!

We've put together a bundle of all of the 2013 issues of Sockupied. Get yours now!

Cheers,

P.S. What's your favorite kind of serious knitting? Leave a comment and let us know!


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Comments

cmsmommy wrote
on Jun 5, 2014 10:31 AM

FYI, you still have the designer's name spelled wrong (it's Hammersen, not Hammerson)

AliPegasus wrote
on Jun 5, 2014 9:26 AM

Kathleen,  normally I love the things you guys put out.  But I really don't know why you would publish such a bad picture. Either your photographer doesn't know he is doing or your photo editor doesn't.  The left sock isn't on her foot right and it takes away from the beauty of the sock.  And if that is deliberate- well,  there are other ways of showing the instep instead of like that.  And I've seen another picture of the inside cuff of that same sock that had an obvious knitting error in it (there is a small ripple). Sorry,  I'm not a professional,  but even I can take better pictures.

AliPegasus wrote
on Jun 5, 2014 9:26 AM

Kathleen,  normally I love the things you guys put out.  But I really don't know why you would publish such a bad picture. Either your photographer doesn't know he is doing or your photo editor doesn't.  The left sock isn't on her foot right and it takes away from the beauty of the sock.  And if that is deliberate- well,  there are other ways of showing the instep instead of like that.  And I've seen another picture of the inside cuff of that same sock that had an obvious knitting error in it (there is a small ripple). Sorry,  I'm not a professional,  but even I can take better pictures.

wevrldy wrote
on Jun 5, 2014 6:34 AM

The socks are beautiful!  I too think the joy (for me) is in the making!  (Truly, I am a maker!). However, I also like knowing a little secret as Samain noted.  Yes, they will not last forever.  But that's not anything unique, is it?  Neither will I!  Do what it is that  gives you joy!

samain wrote
on Jun 5, 2014 12:26 AM

To those who ask why we bother with fancy socks.  The answer is that sometimes the joy is not in the creation but in the creating.  There is a wonderful sense of achievement when you have created something that has both an  intricate motive and 3D shaping.  Also, you may not see my feet but I know what's under my hem and in my shoes. They are for me, not you.

on Jun 4, 2014 4:32 PM

OH MY GOSH!!! Hunter, I am so sorry. I was working between two blog posts, and I got my names mixed up. A thousand apologies.

Kathleen

wendygoerl wrote
on Jun 4, 2014 4:06 PM

I just can't imagine putting all that effort into something that's going to get stuffed into a shoe and worn out, especially when you're carrying a stitch pattern (or even colorwork) all the way to the toe. At least if you keep the fancy stuff in the cuff and go to plain stockinette on the foot, it isn't TOO hard to get a new foot going on an old cuff, but if you've got to figure out where in the pattern your row is at (and try to remember which pattern it is and where you put it).

raddfam4 wrote
on Jun 4, 2014 3:53 PM

Are these knitted from the toe up or top down?

raddfam4 wrote
on Jun 4, 2014 3:53 PM

Are these knitted from the toe up or top down?

on Jun 4, 2014 3:28 PM

I'm thrilled you picked my socks to talk about.  I absolutely adore these and am thrilled with how they came out.  Just as a tiny heads up though, my name is Hunter Hammersen (not Hunter Thompson)!  

SusanP@56 wrote
on Jun 4, 2014 10:37 AM

Favorite serious knitting: anything Aran!  Complex cables, twisted stitches, bobbles.  Second favorite is lace, especially Estonian!

kate@118 wrote
on Jun 4, 2014 9:44 AM

What is the point of making a "beautiful creation" that will then be covered up by shoes?  And if not covered up, but worn around the house, what is the point of a beautiful creation that will soon be rapidly worn out walking on the floor?  I honestly don't get it:  why spend all that time on socks that either can't be seen or are destined for imminent destruction?

MarciaS@19 wrote
on Jun 4, 2014 9:22 AM

The sock designer should be Hunter Hammersen, not Thompson.