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Sock Knitting Contest

Apr 14, 2014

Editor's note: Last weekend we announced a Spring Cleaning contest, but we had some technical difficulties that prevented comments during the official contest period. So we're running a new contest with the same prize!


Win Sock Knitting Treasures

Spring fever has struck in the office. It snowed last night, but we can feel those May flowers on their way! And with spring comes the beloved spring cleaning.

What, you don't love spring cleaning? Well, you may love it when we clean for spring, because some of the treasures we've reviewed in past issues of Sockupied could come your way. In 20 words or less, tell us your best sock-knitting tip. We'll choose our favorite answer from the comments posted on this blog and send some spring treasures to the winner.

 

Here's what our Spring Cleaning Contest includes:

Tom Bihn Clear Quarter Packing Cube plus Yarn Stuff Sack

Chicken Boots DPN protector

The Sock Doctor keychain and tapestry needle

A Soakbox in Lace Kelly

A skein of Twisted Fiber Art self-striping yarn Striping in colorway Cuddy

A skein of Holiday Yarns Silver Sock in colorway Melonhead

To enter the contest, leave a comment below and share your best sock advice. On April 22, 2014, our panel of judges will pick one winner for best tip from the entered comments.  Check back on April 23 to see if you’ve won.  The Contest begins on April 14, 2014, 8:00 p.m.  and ends April 21, 2014, 10:59 a.m. Eastern Time ("ET"). Due to the variety of rules regulating contests worldwide, we can only select winners from entrants that are U.S. residents (excluding Puerto Rico), 18 years old or older at the time of entry; and Canadian residents (excluding Quebec). Read the official contest rules here. 

 

Get Ready for a New Face

It has been a great joy to edit Sockupied. It began as a crazy idea for a kind of knitting magazine we'd never seen before, and before I knew it we'd released ten issues in five years. It's time for me to move on to new challenges as the editor of Spin-Off magazine, but I'm thrilled to leave Sockupied in the hands of Amy Palmer. You may know Amy as the editor of Knitscene magazine, but before that she was part of the team that created the first issue of Sockupied. She is a passionate sock knitter and skilled editor, and she will take the eMag to places I never even dreamed of. (I almost resisted making a comment about taking the next step, but I couldn't quite help myself.) Amy is hard at work on the next issue, but for now you can see what she's been up to over on the Inside Knitscene blog.

I can't wait to read your sock tips, and please welcome Amy!

Happy knitting,


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HollyH@16 wrote
on Jun 12, 2014 5:48 PM

My sock knitting advice is to cast on that second sock IMMEDIATELY after you finish sock #1 -- I always find that I won't avoid that second sock this way.

on Apr 28, 2014 3:34 PM

It's no surprise that Sockupied readers are terrific sock knitters, but the genius behind some of

jennyeileen wrote
on Apr 28, 2014 9:20 AM

Who won? I haven't seen a winner posted.

Linda_in_WI wrote
on Apr 26, 2014 1:38 AM

Before you finish your socks, duplicate stitch over the areas where you know your socks will wear out.  Having the double thickness of yarn will help prevent holes from forming.

Linda_in_WI wrote
on Apr 26, 2014 1:29 AM

If you know where you typically wear holes in your socks, reserve some yarn and duplicate stitch over those areas - not when they get old, but right after you bind off.  The double thickness will help prevent holes from forming.

on Apr 25, 2014 10:05 AM

My best sock tip would be to learn 2-at-a-time. No need to make notes on pattern placement for gussets, etc. No need to count cables. You're doing it all at the same time so they come out even EVERY time!

ljbs wrote
on Apr 24, 2014 12:12 AM

I love making tube socks .they are fun

ljbs wrote
on Apr 24, 2014 12:12 AM

I love making tube socks .they are fun

momterra wrote
on Apr 23, 2014 4:58 PM

I have recently figured out how to double the thickness of the bottom of socks.  My size 16 footed son wears through his sock faster than I can knit, so I double it.  

Start at the back of the heel, casting on half the stitches on two needles and double yarn.  Short row the heel, continue for the length of the foot, and short row the toe.  Now with a single strand continue (in rib or fancy pattern) to do the top of the foot, picking up the last stitch from the bottom every row.  Add extra stitches if required as you approach the heel turn.  Now pick up the stitches you started the heel with and continue in a round for the cuff.  If you want, several rows can be knit before starting to turn the heel to reinforce the back of the sock and for a invisible pickup before the cuff - use scrap yarn for the cast on and pickup the stitches directly.  These socks don't seem to take any longer to knit, there is still no seaming, and last a lot longer, though they do take longer to dry after washing.

Happy Stitching

Sandra T

on Apr 23, 2014 1:17 PM

The best way to avoid the second sock syndrome is to knit the second sock first.

works for me every time.

please understand if you are trying to understand what I am saying it is a joke. it is all a mind game, say you have knit #2 and now you only have #1 to knit. all good.

I love socks, am on #88 and don't mind the second one in the least. I usually make it match perfectly which takes some figuring but has become "my thing" and people know to inspect for matches and laugh at how accurate I am.

Carrie Kramer

JayneT@2 wrote
on Apr 23, 2014 9:12 AM

My best sock knitting tip is to knit through the back loop of the first round of all gusset stitches. This will eliminate holes that can result from picking up the initial gusset stitches. It works every time and is fool-proof. I teach this technique in all of my beginner sock classes.

JayneT@2 wrote
on Apr 23, 2014 9:12 AM

My best sock knitting tip is to knit through the back loop of the first round of all gusset stitches. This will eliminate holes that can result from picking up the initial gusset stitches. It works every time and is fool-proof. I teach this technique in all of my beginner sock classes.

alcbrooks wrote
on Apr 22, 2014 4:53 PM

Best sock tip is to knit them both at the same time - that way they will match. I use two 9" circulars

Bstrommer wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 9:19 PM

Fear is the biggest obstacle in sock knitting. Take your time and read through the pattern carefully, you'll be surprised at what you can accomplish.

ritchij wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 8:00 PM

Socks aren't scary! They're also one of the best ways to learn all sorts of techniques in a fairly low stress way - from picking up stitches to knitting with tiny needles.

cwalden wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 2:48 PM

I love knitting socks and they are a practical project in my muggy neck of the woods.  The things that I have learned knitting socks are to be patient, read ahead and don't let your pattern and yarn fight (work a pattern that is best for your yarn).  

2ndKnitter wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 2:09 PM

Always read the pattern carefully, do not assume that you know what you are doing.

2ndKnitter wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 2:09 PM

Always read the pattern carefully, do not assume that you know what you are doing.

Dorapie wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 1:03 PM

I love knitting short socks.

MsLaurieLane wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 12:38 PM

Why do people often have problems downloading the emag?

MsLaurieLane wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 12:38 PM

Why do people often have problems downloading the emag?

CathyB@14 wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 12:33 PM

I knit socks two at a time but not on the same needle.  I have enough circs to keep both socks going knitting a few inches on one then on the other.  This prevents the dreaded second sock syndrome but you don't have to contend with keeping two balls of yarn untangled.

allysinnia wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 9:52 AM

I was at a spinner's guild meeting when a lady told me about something Clover has recently released; point protectors to hold all of your DPNs while making a sock.  It will hold all 5 needles when you need to store your work.  I had to have a set.  It's great - no more hunting that last needle, and worrying about it breaking in your knitting bag.  The one I have holds needles 0-5(US), and I think they have another one for larger needles, 6-10(US).

KaetheP wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 6:53 AM

If you knit socks one at a time, the very best way to avoid the dreaded Second Sock Syndrome is to start the second sock IMMEDIATELY after finishing off the first one. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) currently has no cure for the SSS, so all sock knitters everywhere need to be very cautious about catching it. Prevention is everything: start that second sock now!

KaetheP wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 6:53 AM

If you knit socks one at a time, the very best way to avoid the dreaded Second Sock Syndrome is to start the second sock IMMEDIATELY after finishing off the first one. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) currently has no cure for the SSS, so all sock knitters everywhere need to be very cautious about catching it. Prevention is everything: start that second sock now!

KaetheP wrote
on Apr 21, 2014 6:53 AM

If you knit socks one at a time, the very best way to avoid the dreaded Second Sock Syndrome is to start the second sock IMMEDIATELY after finishing off the first one. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) currently has no cure for the SSS, so all sock knitters everywhere need to be very cautious about catching it. Prevention is everything: start that second sock now!

chalimar16 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 9:21 PM

1. Cast on the second sock the moment you finish the first sock.  Helps prevent second sock syndrome.

2. Just because other knitters complain about X technique being difficult doesn't mean you'll find it so.  Try it with an open mind.  One reason it took me a while to knit my first sock was that I'd heard how terrible Kitchner stitch was.  Once I finally gave it a go, I found it made sense to me and I didn't struggle.  

3. Stranded knitting on socks makes them extra-warm because of the double layer of fabric.  Perfect for a northeast winter!

mdflowers wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 6:48 PM

Hi folks,

Here is my sock knitting tip that I am submitting to enter the Spring Cleaning contest.  I submitted this same tip a while back and didn't win anything - maybe that was when things weren't working?

When I am knitting socks, I usually do two at a time on 2 circular needles.  Once I get going, I pin a small sandwich baggie around each sock so that the completed knitting doesn't get "roughed up" as I continue working.  I move the baggies up each time I complete about and inch or two of work.  When the socks get too long to fit inside the baggies easily, I roll the socks up and pin the edges so they won't unroll and they continue to fit just fine.  When I'm done, the knitted work is all fresh and pill-less, ready to be blocked.

Thanks for considering my tip.

Mary

kat5tx wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 6:33 PM

I've been trying to actually LIKE knitting socks for a couple years, but until I tried the Fish Lips Kiss heel and measuring method, it just wasn't working.  Now I know I can enjoy making the socks and also be sure they will fit!

sallyryan261 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 5:40 PM

Sock Sanity Saver Suggestions: Cast on a longer SPN, knit/purl your first row and then change to your DPNs. Less twisting and easily joined. Make two socks at once on two sets of DPNS - cuffs of each then move to legs, on to heels then finish up with feet and toes. Measuring, count and tensions is more accurate with no Second Sock Syndrome.

Sally in Gettysburg, PA

mgquilts wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 5:20 PM

I wanted to learn how to make socks but was concerned about conquering the heel so I started with a pair of baby socks. They were not a great deal of effort and still taught me what I needed to know before I invested time and $$ in a pair of socks for myself. The socks went to my church's Baby World for needy families and I know they kept a child's feet warm that winter.

mgquilts wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 5:20 PM

I wanted to learn how to make socks but was concerned about conquering the heel so I started with a pair of baby socks. They were not a great deal of effort and still taught me what I needed to know before I invested time and $$ in a pair of socks for myself. The socks went to my church's Baby World for needy families and I know they kept a child's feet warm that winter.

MicheleC@8 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 5:04 PM

My tip for knitting socks from the toe up is to use the magic loop method with 40 inch circular needles so you do not get "ladders" on the sides of your sock while knitting.  MC

laurenkusa wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 4:52 PM

I'm a big fan of sock knitting.  I enjoy the patterns and they go relatively quickly.

laurenkusa wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 4:52 PM

I'm a big fan of sock knitting.  I enjoy the patterns and they go relatively quickly.

laurenkusa wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 4:52 PM

I'm a big fan of sock knitting.  I enjoy the patterns and they go relatively quickly.

NathanneV wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 3:58 PM

I always have yarn left over from an adult pair of socks I've just knit.  I save it, and then use it to make a pair of baby socks for my grandson.  If I make the leg longer, about 3-4 inches long, and using k2p2 ribbing,  it stays up better on the baby's legs.  

mherman wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 3:31 PM

Try a pair of tube socks. Especially if knitting for a toddler. When kid's foot grows, the sock still fits!

millswis wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 2:14 PM

Always have a friend, who loves your knitted socks. Why, you ask? Because, that way, if there is a new sock design, skill set or sock pattern that you really want to try, but don't want the actual socks. Well, that's where your sock loving knit friend comes in. Your friend, does not knit, but when you a message with the intended sock pattern, you can always count on your sock loving friend to say yes.

I learn new designs and skills and my friend, well a new pair of interesting socks. For me that is what sock knitting is all about.

littleredhot wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 2:12 PM

Try new patterns and techniques in socks - play with color and start small if you're nervous.  Kids always need socks!

on Apr 20, 2014 2:06 PM

If you find that you're socks form ridges at the top of your ankle, you probably have a high instep, add a few rows to your heel flap, and pick up an extra stitch on each side for the gusset. Work the decreases as specified in the pattern until you reach the stitch count specified in the pattern. No more lumpy socks at the ankles.

SpringSplndr wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 1:27 PM

I'm a new sock knitter.  My best advice is to jump in and just try it.  You might find you like it.

SuSangSews wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 1:12 PM

I use wooly nylon to reinforce the heels and toes of my socks.  It's thin enough to not add bulk, slightly stretchy, and comes in a wide array of colors to match your sock or add a bit of a punch if you use a contrasting color.  If you don't have a serger and don't want to invest in multiple colors, just buy a neutral color that will blend with most of your sock yarn.

awalker55 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 1:00 PM

When knitting two at a time socks, divide your skein of sock yarn into two equal parts by using a kitchen scale.  Weigh the unused skein of yarn using grams (i.e. 100 grams).  Then wind your second ball of yarn from the skein until the skein weighs half the original weight (i.e. 50 grams).  There you have it: two balls of yarn exactly the same amount!

on Apr 20, 2014 11:58 AM

My best sock knitting advice is keep going - trust the pattern the first time.

If you're confused, have someone read the directions aloud to you while you are following the instructions. Sometimes that's all it takes is to hear it while you're doing it.

If that doesn't help find help at your LYS or a local knitting group. They should be willing to help you. If not, there are great tutorial videos a available online through Knitting Daily or other sources.

Good luck to all in the contest.

Jeannie

on Apr 20, 2014 11:58 AM

My best sock knitting advice is keep going - trust the pattern the first time.

If you're confused, have someone read the directions aloud to you while you are following the instructions. Sometimes that's all it takes is to hear it while you're doing it.

If that doesn't help find help at your LYS or a local knitting group. They should be willing to help you. If not, there are great tutorial videos a available online through Knitting Daily or other sources.

Good luck to all in the contest.

Jeannie

on Apr 20, 2014 11:52 AM

I would love to see patterns/ tips for knitting 2 or more pairs of socks at once on one circular needle toe up (or even cuff down).

good luck to everyone!    :0)

Jeannie

MarjorieD@4 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 11:33 AM

Knit two-at-a-time using the Magic Loop and keep track of the pattern row with Post-it

Notes.

on Apr 20, 2014 11:04 AM

If you want to know the size of your, or someone else's foot, it is the same as the distance from your wrist to the inside of your elbow. Easier to measure and can be done in public!

djbseb wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 10:33 AM

To keep track of the washing requirements on hand knit socks, I put in a row or two of color coded yarn in the toes - red = hand wash, line dry, yellow= machine wash, line dry, and green = machine wash and dry. This is easy to remember. I include the instructions when I knit gift socks.

yvgbk wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 9:43 AM

When knitting socks from the top down, in order to prevent holes at the top of the gusset, I pick up two extra stitches and then when knitting the gusset, those stitches are decreased (through ssk or k2tog).  Viola, no holes!

yvgbk wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 9:43 AM

When knitting socks from the top down, in order to prevent holes at the top of the gusset, I pick up two extra stitches and then when knitting the gusset, those stitches are decreased (through ssk or k2tog).  Viola, no holes!

LauraT@4 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 9:27 AM

Be brave and try a pattern.  It is a good opportunity to try something new on a small scale.

MCortada wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 9:25 AM

I keep a baggie with a simple sock on a small (8") circular needle in the car.  I call these my "red light" or "waiting" socks.  I knit while waiting at a doctor's office or some other appointment.  If I get to an appointment a little early, I'll knit a few rows before leaving the car.  Sometimes I even knit while stopped at red lights.  

mwaybrant wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 7:31 AM

My best advice is don't be scared, just throw caution to the wind and cast on!!!! They are so much easier to knit then you could imagine.  You will be shocked you were able to complete the pattern on your own!

DebbieS@4 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 7:30 AM

To keep track of what row I'm on when knitting socks (or anything) in the round with a pattern that says "every other row", I have a two inch piece of waste yarn with a large knot in one end at the beginning of the round.  If the 'P'lain end is out, that's a 'P'attern row, if the "knot' end is out, I do 'not' do the pattern on that round.  It's easy to flip the waste yarn every time I pass it, and saves trying to analyze where I was when I pick up the knitting again.

KathyC@94 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 1:30 AM

My best tip for socks; when you do the plain round after the decrease round on toe and gusset, knit the stitch that results from the ssk through the back loop and then the line will be nice and straight instead of kind of wiggly. It mirrors the neat and tidy k2 tog side. This is, of course, if you knit  with the western mounted stitches.

 Kathy the knitter

Lindy15 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 12:29 AM

I knit my first pair of socks,toe up, two at a time, on two circular needles, in worsted weight yarn. I used US 7 needles, so I could see the stitches and learn the techniques. That resulted in a nice pair of slipper socks. Fun!

MarthaD@6 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 12:13 AM

I like knitting socks toe up, two at a time using magic loop.  I drop down  size for the ribbing so the socks stay up, and I use a sewn bind off to keep them stretchy.

MarthaD@6 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 12:11 AM

I love knitting socks two up to at a time on magic loop.  I drop down a needle size for the ribbing to make the sock stay up, and use a sewn bind off to keep it stretchy.

kimmer1 wrote
on Apr 20, 2014 12:08 AM

Just don't be afraid to try a sock if you never have before, it's simpler than it seems. I say start with a simple design and use worsted and knit a sample so you can understand how the sock is constructed. After that you will be either hooked on making socks to wear or never want to knit another in your life..

Cindy in AK wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:47 PM

I love to make a memorable day of yarn shopping/selection with the person I'm gifting a pair of socks.

h king wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:32 PM

My tip is when binding off to use "My favorite bindoff". Knit two together then return stitch to left needle, continue to k2tog and return to left needle all the way across. Very easy and neat bindoff.

marychance wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:33 PM

If you have problems with the bind-off ending up too tight on toe up socks, do the last row of the cuff and bind-off on needles one or two sizes larger.  I have large calves (from dancing as a child) and need that extra bit of stretch.

TobieL wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 7:50 PM

Socks are great to make because the public is so impressed that you know how to do that!  Also, they make wonderful gifts--your friends and relatives will be so happy to own a pair of hand knit socks.  Make sure you use a very tight gauge for long lasting socks.

cashgorad wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 7:41 PM

I love making socks to match all the sweaters I make.  I use the pattern stitch from the sweater for the leg & top of foot & make the bottom of foot, heel & toes in stockinette.   I heartily recommend using 2 circular needles to prevent ladders on the sides of the socks.

cathat wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 7:21 PM

My most recently learned favorite sock knitting tip is Jeny's Amazingly Stretchy Bind-off for toe-up socks. No more tight cuffs!

on Apr 19, 2014 7:03 PM

Have fun and just knit socks.  If they aren't perfect, relax and remember they can be worn in shoes and under your slacks.

on Apr 19, 2014 7:03 PM

Have fun and just knit socks.  If they aren't perfect, relax and remember they can be worn in shoes and under your slacks.

on Apr 19, 2014 7:02 PM

I use the magic loop method and to get rid of the 'ladder' effect I tighten the first and last stitches on each needle quite a bit while it's on the cord,  the tight stitches pick up the ladder looseness and it all disappears.

karenjsp wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 7:00 PM

Just finishing my first pair of socks. Next time I will try to knit two at a time since one of the reasons I have procrastinated  on trying to knit socks is that they might not end up to be the same size. Knitting both at the same time will give the same number of rows and allow for less opportunity for variations in tension - I hope ;-)

fourcats1dog wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 6:16 PM

Take a class on knitting socks before making the first pair.  

HelenF@12 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 6:01 PM

If you haven't already, learn to knit socks from the toe up. You'll never run out of yarn on your second sock - just use a kitchen scale to track how much yarn you use in your first sock. Plan to cast off a few grams shy of the halfway point in your ball and you'll be sure to have enough for sock #2!!

Cathy4G wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 5:58 PM

Great contest!  Keep your spare yarn for finshed socks in your sock drawer, then you can find it for repairs every time!

DebbieS@4 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 5:58 PM

I always knit socks toe-up, so I can just knit the cuffs till I run out of yarn and because I hate grafting anything (like sock toes). I've learned to use Jeni's Super Stretchy Bind Off, too, which has made my socks fit much better.

on Apr 19, 2014 5:58 PM

Be open to new techniques

ChrisH-H wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 5:44 PM

When knitting socks in two (or more) coloured pattern, be sure to choose (or create) a pattern that has only one colour in a row through the instep. This way the sock will stretch in the right place when you're trying to put it on even if your knitting is a little snug.

tribblesnz wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 5:26 PM

My method for casting on and distributing the stitches for cuff-down socks on DPNs:

I long-tail cast on half the number of stitches on two DPNs held together, then the other half on the other two DPNS. Slip half the stitches out of the first needle and leave the second half on the second, slip half out of the third, voilà: all stitches evenly on 4 needles and cast on evenly and loosely. Double-check they're not twisted, and knit the first 3 stitches with both the running yarn and the long tail. Then drop the long tail. No ugly "step" or stretched stitch at the beginning.

on Apr 19, 2014 5:20 PM

Always always always take good notes!

on Apr 19, 2014 5:20 PM

Always always always take good notes!

on Apr 19, 2014 5:17 PM

It is VERY important to take good notes!  No matter what method you use to knit, or what type of needles you knit with, without good notes you can't make good socks,

Note detailed measurements for each personal you knit for.

Note what size needles gave the correct guage for each type of yarn used.

Note any changes you make to the pattern as you knit.

For self-striping yarn, start your knitting at the beginning of a color change and write down what you did.  This helps the socks turn out the same.

After the socks are finished, note how they wear.  Do they stretch out?  Are they super soft and cozy after washing?

Armed with this information, you will succeed in knitting future pairs.

Have fun!

S. Heglie

soozieq wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 5:11 PM

My best tip is, "Don't be intimidated!"  Even children can knit socks, so why not you? Focus on each part of the sock at a time and keep going.  Pretty soon, voila, you have a sock.  Then, you have two.

Treys Mom wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 5:11 PM

Start with a basic pattern for your first pair but don't be afraid to go straight for the magic loop method and knit them two at a time!

namoscher wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 5:04 PM

My favourite heel flap is " eye of partridge "; so sturdy and pretty!

dog.dorm wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 4:27 PM

My best sock making tip is "Two At A time"  Then when you are done you have a pair.  It is well worth learning how to do them that way.

katielou92 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 4:13 PM

I love to knit socks.  I haven't knit any fancy ones, but I love it.  :o)  One very important tip is to make sure that your first row--cast on row is straight and doesn't get twisted when you join and start knitting.  :o)

katielou92 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 4:12 PM

I love to knit socks.  I haven't knit any fancy ones, but I love it.  :o)  One very important tip is to make sure that your first row--cast on row is straight and doesn't get twisted when you join and start knitting.  :o)

MargieK@3 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:34 PM

I knit about 14 pairs of socks every year for Christmas presents. Believe it or not that's what they want. But, 6 pairs are white. One family gets 4 pairs, 4 family members. To stop theft, I now color code the socks. Each one gets a couple of rows of ribbing in their color (chosen by them). The row before color change is done in st st. Next row in color is done in rib. This prevents blips in ribbing. I am the fussy knitter.

GTiger wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:31 PM

Use self striping yarn to knit plain socks with wow appeal.

Don't give up if the Kitchener stitch doesn't work the first couple of times - Keep trying it does get easier.

DilysW wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:30 PM

My advice for learners making socks is to buy two sets of needles. Work on the pair at the same time. Do the cuff for one, then the other. Then do the one leg and then the other. It improves your memory on how to make the sock and avoids the second sock syndrome. Also it inspires you to finish it quicker.

DilysW wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:30 PM

My advice for learners making socks is to buy two sets of needles. Work on the pair at the same time. Do the cuff for one, then the other. Then do the one leg and then the other. It improves your memory on how to make the sock and avoids the second sock syndrome. Also it inspires you to finish it quicker.

DilysW wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:29 PM

My advice for learners making socks is to buy two sets of needles. Work on the pair at the same time. Do the cuff for one, then the other. Then do the one leg and then the other. It improves your memory on how to make the sock and avoids the second sock syndrome. Also it inspires you to finish it quicker.

NancyG@4 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:23 PM

Start with "footies" - you'll finish quicker while still learning the important steps.  

NancyG@4 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:22 PM

Start with "footies" - you'll finish quicker while still learning the important steps.  

marywoods wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:20 PM

Quick tip for washing the superwash wool socks.  Put liquid fabric softener in the rinse cycle.  It helps take some of the stiffness out of the sock yarn and makes them a little softer.  Also, instead of laying them flat to dry, I have a toy chain with clips hanging over my washer and dryer so as soon as the socks come out of the washer, they go on the clips.

martje wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:19 PM

For better fitting socks, try knitting the whole leg and top of the foot in ribbing. I do this  as I have a narrow foot and the socks have a nicer fit.

gmauhls wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:14 PM

My best sock advice really comes from my aunt, who inspired me to begin knitting socks about 10 years ago,  The advice is this, knit what you love and if it doesn't fit find someone who loves it as much as you and bless them with it.  

I love to knit socks and I love to try something new. However I hate to check gauge.  If I knit a sick in color work that is too big, and I did, someone will love it as a Christmas stocking.  If I knit a sock in lace and it is too small, I have a Bible Study friend who has size 5 feet, much smaller than my size 81/2 feet.  She loves the socks.   Trying new things is good for your brain and good for knitting!

gmauhls wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:13 PM

My best sock advice really comes from my aunt, who inspired me to begin knitting socks about 10 years ago,  The advice is this, knit what you love and if it doesn't fit find someone who loves it as much as you and bless them with it.  

I love to knit socks and I love to try something new. However I hate to check gauge.  If I knit a sick in color work that is too big, and I did, someone will love it as a Christmas stocking.  If I knit a sock in lace and it is too small, I have a Bible Study friend who has size 5 feet, much smaller than my size 81/2 feet.  She loves the socks.   Trying new things is good for your brain and good for knitting!

gmauhls wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:13 PM

My best sock advice really comes from my aunt, who inspired me to begin knitting socks about 10 years ago,  The advice is this, knit what you love and if it doesn't fit find someone who loves it as much as you and bless them with it.  

I love to knit socks and I love to try something new. However I hate to check gauge.  If I knit a sick in color work that is too big, and I did, someone will love it as a Christmas stocking.  If I knit a sock in lace and it is too small, I have a Bible Study friend who has size 5 feet, much smaller than my size 81/2 feet.  She loves the socks.   Trying new things is good for your brain and good for knitting!

gmauhls wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:13 PM

My best sock advice really comes from my aunt, who inspired me to begin knitting socks about 10 years ago,  The advice is this, knit what you love and if it doesn't fit find someone who loves it as much as you and bless them with it.  

I love to knit socks and I love to try something new. However I hate to check gauge.  If I knit a sick in color work that is too big, and I did, someone will love it as a Christmas stocking.  If I knit a sock in lace and it is too small, I have a Bible Study friend who has size 5 feet, much smaller than my size 81/2 feet.  She loves the socks.   Trying new things is good for your brain and good for knitting!

hanco wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:03 PM

I have just started knitting socks, so I'm not an expert to be giving advice.  I would suggest if you are starting out, not to give up if you try one way to knit socks and it seems hard to you.  There are lots of methods out there to try.

on Apr 19, 2014 3:01 PM

If you want to knit socks just go for it.Enjoy the process.It is creative after all.

najo-osh wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 3:00 PM

If you are intimidated by the fineness of sock yarn, try making a pair of socks using worsted first. Once you get the feel of sock knitting, then the type of yarn will never intimidate you.

HeatherK@23 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:49 PM

My best advice re socks is to also learn how to darn them properly. This can really extend the life of your socks.  Wind a bit of your sock yarn on a bobbin and identify it. Then you will have just what you need when the socks need darning. Don't wait for a hole - check the socks whan laundering, darn when they get thin , before the yarn breaks - if possible.  Your socks will thank you.

AndreaW wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:44 PM

Teach others to knit socks too!!!  You can't possibly knit enough pairs to keep everyone happy by yourself, can you?

begarcia wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:33 PM

When knitting sock I cast on the appropriate number of stitches then I purl one row then join in the round and proceed with the pattern or ribbing. It makes a rwally nice edge and helps hold up the sock on the calf.

MrsZimm1313 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:33 PM

If you can knit and count, you can make socks.  Don't psych yourself out too much thinking that knitting socks is overly hard.  Just cast on, follow the instructions, and be amazed at how skilled you really are!  

I wanted to knit socks for over a year and hesitated to cast on.  I wish I had just dove in and started.  It was a real confidence booster to make a pair of socks when I had thought they would be difficult.

sritchie171 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:31 PM

Just do it!  And check out the videos!

SusanE@43 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:29 PM

When picking up stitches along the heel flap, use a crochet hook or another needle to pick up the stitches and place them on the gusset needle. Wiggling the gusset needle to pick up the gusset stitches along the heel flap pulls on the yarn and stretches out the gusset stitches. Before doing the Kitchener stitch on the remaining toe stitches, lift the last stitch over the next-to-last stitch at the ends of all 4 DPN or 2 circular needles. This will prevent "mouse ears" on the bound-off toe.

on Apr 19, 2014 2:20 PM

I have been hesitant about knitting socks until I took Lucy Neatby's double knit course on Craftsy.  After knitting a pair of socks with scalloped top and double knit sole I now think I am ready to knit any kind of socks.  I would recommend Lucy Neatby's free pattern for socks.  Her explanations are clear and allow for the perfect fit for any foot.

sdobro wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:05 PM

There's a style of knitting socks that will encourage success for everyone.  Sometimes it requires trying more than one style to find your fit.

RMBC wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:05 PM

When knitting socks top down, the row AFTER you pick up stitches along the side (gusset), knit through the back loop for those gusset stitches, putting a twist into the stitch.  This makes a tidier and tighter "seam" along the gusset.

Doreen MacL wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 2:03 PM

My favourite way to knit socks is two at a time. Defeats second sock syndrome!

on Apr 19, 2014 1:57 PM

My best sock advice is to convert from 4 double point needles to magic loop, one circular knitting needle. I have made 87 pair of socks, the first 40 before I learned the technique.  I loved every minute of it but now I LOVE EVERY MINUTE OF IT.  It is so great to put your knitting down and nothing falls off the needle, the speed you can get is amazing,  you finish faster while enjoying it more and then on to the next pair, all good.

Carrie Kramer

Grammy Susie wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 1:51 PM

My Tip is just do it! I use to look at hand knit socks and think I'd love to knit that but was afraid to try, It's too complicated , it will take too long, I culd never knit on 4 needles. Till one day I just said I'll do it! I can knit on 4 needles I can follow a pattern, I CAN hand knit socks, And I Love It!  So if your afraid of Socks don't be just DO It!

Susie P

mmk7237 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 1:38 PM

For sock knitters using dpns, do the following.  After completing the cuff, heel, turn, and pick-up stitches, you will have your stitches on 3 needles.  Place small safety pins or split ring markers on your work just below each needle.  Use 1 pin on needle #1, 2 pins on needle #2, and 3 pins on needle #3.  You will always know exactly where you are.

mmk7237 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 1:38 PM

For sock knitters using dpns, do the following.  After completing the cuff, heel, turn, and pick-up stitches, you will have your stitches on 3 needles.  Place small safety pins or split ring markers on your work just below each needle.  Use 1 pin on needle #1, 2 pins on needle #2, and 3 pins on needle #3.  You will always know exactly where you are.

SuzanneL@2 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 1:26 PM

Make a mini-sock to get an idea how the colors  of a new ball of space dyed yarn will play out, besides a sense of gauge.

Save them & have a ready lot of gift/tree ornaments...or hoard 24 for a wonderful Advent calendar!

ssdanderson wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 1:25 PM

My favorite knitting project is making socks!  There are a few items I think are essential to knitting socks.  I use bamboo needles.  Sock yarn is smaller and finer and bamboo needles really keep your work on the needles.  The other thing I always use is stitch markers.  They really help when working in the round.  One of my other go-to supplies is graph paper.  I know I will never remember where I left off so I always use graph paper to keep track of what pattern round I ended on.  Using graph paper is also a great way to measure or track pattern repeats and rounds from your first sock, as a guide when doing the second sock.

ssdanderson wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 1:25 PM

My favorite knitting project is making socks!  There are a few items I think are essential to knitting socks.  I use bamboo needles.  Sock yarn is smaller and finer and bamboo needles really keep your work on the needles.  The other thing I always use is stitch markers.  They really help when working in the round.  One of my other go-to supplies is graph paper.  I know I will never remember where I left off so I always use graph paper to keep track of what pattern round I ended on.  Using graph paper is also a great way to measure or track pattern repeats and rounds from your first sock, as a guide when doing the second sock.

on Apr 19, 2014 1:24 PM

Knit both socks at once on two circulars to get socks the same size and avoid "been there, done that!"

glonsew wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 1:00 PM

I am 70 years old, but when I was in my 30's and even in my 40's I was determined to learn to knit socks.  Through the years I would take out my necessaries to try again, then again, because I could not get the written instructions interpreted to my needles!

One year ago, I lost my job.  This allowed me time to refocus on what was not a part of my "Bucket List".  The written instructions still did not help.  BUT, guess what?  It was now the age of computers, videos of tutorials and mentors online to teach me what the written words meant.  Sock knitting is simply THE BEST of all worlds.  Good things come from loss of employment.

For those of you who are looking for  easy, portable,  rewarding and quick knits to give to friends and family, this is the creative venue to follow.  There are unbelievable ideas, patterns plus webpages like eKnittiing Mag.  Do NOT put sock knitting on your "Bucket List"!  Today's the day.  Success is at your needle-tips!

Myridian wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 1:00 PM

to prevent holes when joining the heel to the body I've started m1 on each end of the instep before starting the heel, doing a yo the row before joining and the ktog the m1, yo, end stitch from the heel & (for good measure) a picked up stitch (one that had already been knitted) from the row below.  I know it sounds weird, but it works for me!

colekrc wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 12:56 PM

 The following is really helpful to an inexperienced knitter like me.  To prevent me from making mistakes when I return to knitting - I set up my pattern on index cards - after I knit the card it goes to the bottom of the stack. Therefore when I return to knit I know just where to start.

ejflanders wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 12:39 PM

My suggestion is to take the time to measure the feet of the person you are making the socks for, each foot as they can differ!

SKornblum wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 12:17 PM

I am also new to sock knitting. My suggestion is bamboo DPN instead of another material so the stitches won't slip off.

Deenasan wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 12:15 PM

To start out knitting socks, start small! Knit a pair of socks for baby or toddler. Toe up, two at a time is the best for beginners. Kitchener stitch is the best for the toe. Generally, it helps to measure the length of the little one's foot and stop within two inches of the length and start working on the heel.

JudyD@53 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 12:15 PM

My best tip for top down socks: Cast on on a needle 2-3 sizes larger than the one that you will use for the sock. That prevents the top of the cuff from being too tight.

LoriR@10 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 12:15 PM

A great sock must have a great beginning. For top-down socks there is no other cast-on like the "Old Norwegian Cast-on"; it is sturdy and very elastic. A tight cast-on will kill a sock no matter what else you do from there. A knitting friend showed me this a few years ago; and now I use it religiously for any project that requires a strong, yet elastic starting edge.  My go-to reference for this method is the "Getting Started Knitting Socks" by Ann Budd; there are also many You-Tube videos that demonstrate  this method wonderfully.

sharonligh wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 12:07 PM

his is different from the usual Long-Tail cast on -- Did I send this to you? This is for left-handers like me, in case you have one in your family.   A very elastic cast on, especially for top of socks.  Sharon Light

www.youtube.com/watch

Here's one for Righties:  

www.youtube.com/watch

BeverlyH wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:59 AM

My tip:  After finishing your heel flap and turn, you start picking up stitches for the gusset, don't worry about picking up a certain number, just pick-up and knit right down to where you meet the saved instep stitches.  This might add an extra stitch but you'll never have that nasty hole in the corner of the gusset.  Bev the Sock Knitter.

conradk wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:58 AM

Make your socks 2 at a time - it prevents second sock syndrome  For heel reinforcement, try adding a second strand of yarn for the heel - either the same yarn as the rest of the sock or a sturdier one.

sharonligh wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:58 AM

Here is a more elastic cast one for top-down socks -- This is different from the usual Long-Tail cast on -- There are videos for left-handers like me, in case you have one in your family and for right-handers too  

Lefties:  www.youtube.com/watch

Here's one for Righties:  

www.youtube.com/watch

lynchski wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:50 AM

My advice for sock knitting is to do two at a time.(I use magic loop.) That way they are both the same size. It is important to ensure that the self striping yarns are in the same place and that the yarn is unwinding in the same direction. Wind the yarn itno two same size balls by undoing half of the ball (weigh it to be sure) and then wind up that loose yarn so the both balls start with the same colour and change in the same manner. If you just wind off into the new ball, it will be changing in reverse.

clumbermom wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:46 AM

For a newer knitter:  Always get assistance with a problem or glitch right away.  No need to add angst to the challenges.  This will keep you moving along and being happy with what you are making.

Maggie@48 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:42 AM

My tip:  get a small bag that is just big enough for your yarn & needles and small enough to fit in your purse.  Take it every where you go   Work a round here and one there and before you know it you have a new pair of socks.....then repeat!

Maggie@48 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:42 AM

My tip:  get a small bag that is just big enough for your yarn & needles and small enough to fit in your purse.  Take it every where you go   Work a round here and one there and before you know it you have a new pair of socks.....then repeat!

1shermie1 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:40 AM

My biggest tip is to learn two at a time Magic Loop - a good book with pictures helped me. I have many unfinished pairs on dpn! Definitely worth the learning curve : )

I bought a lap size plastic tray from big box store. Placing my two balls in zip sandwich bags (as another knitter suggested), or single large ball working from inside and out, on the tray, I rotate tray or balls after each round to prevent tangles. I can lay my project aside without fear of new tangles and grab it quickly for a few minutes knitting escape.

Always make myself complete a round before I put my needles down.

1shermie1 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:40 AM

My biggest tip is to learn two at a time Magic Loop - a good book with pictures helped me. I have many unfinished pairs on dpn! Definitely worth the learning curve : )

I bought a lap size plastic tray from big box store. Placing my two balls in zip sandwich bags (as another knitter suggested), or single large ball working from inside and out, on the tray, I rotate tray or balls after each round to prevent tangles. I can lay my project aside without fear of new tangles and grab it quickly for a few minutes knitting escape.

Always make myself complete a round before I put my needles down.

1shermie1 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:40 AM

My biggest tip is to learn two at a time Magic Loop - a good book with pictures helped me. I have many unfinished pairs on dpn! Definitely worth the learning curve : )

I bought a lap size plastic tray from big box store. Placing my two balls in zip sandwich bags (as another knitter suggested), or single large ball working from inside and out, on the tray, I rotate tray or balls after each round to prevent tangles. I can lay my project aside without fear of new tangles and grab it quickly for a few minutes knitting escape.

Always make myself complete a round before I put my needles down.

maknits22 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:39 AM

I am really new to sock knitting, but my advice would be to just keep trying!  Practice and patience will help too.  :-)

emilymcrae wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:36 AM

My tip is about matching your two socks with self striping yarn. First, take the time to split the yarn into two balls by weight if it's a 100g ball, or else start with two 50g balls, usually enough for two socks.  Then find the match in the pattern of the yarn on both balls and put a slip knot in each at the matching point, where you will start your cast on. I think they look so much better when they match!

MissPammy wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:34 AM

My advice is to check gauge again periodically throughout the project.  On one pair of socks I made, I did a gauge swatch at the beginning and thought, "Cool, my gauge is perfect!"  Then I just knitted the socks without ever checking the gauge again.  When I was done, I had socks that would have fit a giant.  They were a really nice yarn made out of lambswool, too.  They ended up being my socks to wear in bed when it's cold outside, because there is no way they would ever fit into a shoe.

amstf02 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:25 AM

I'm fairly new to knitting socks.  I'd like to see tips on how to reinforce heels.  My family is rough on heels, especially the bottoms, and I haven't found a solution as of yet.  But I LOVE knitted socks.  They are so comfortable and fun to make.  

Tgene52 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:22 AM

Practice practice practice, use yarns you love so you stay interested and pick interesting patterns. A challenge is a good thing.

Tgene52 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:22 AM

Practice practice practice, use yarns you love so you stay interested and pick interesting patterns. A challenge is a good thing.

nosbahr wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:20 AM

2 circulars, great yarn, Judy's cast on, short row heel, Jenny's bind off, keep notes/measurements=fabulous socks!  

mdrgault wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 11:20 AM

My sister is the sockhound, but she has induced me to try it.  I found that using 2 circular needles gives me the best results, and the toe up version is great.  I would recommend as my tip that for anyone interested in toe up to look at Cat Borgues(?)  tutorial.  Brilliant.

on Apr 19, 2014 11:01 AM

After knitting literally hundreds of pairs of socks, and struggling with that ugly little HOLE between the heel flap and the instep, I've finally found a solution that works for me.

You know how patterns often say "make a stitch in the gap" or "pick up a strand in the gap"? My go-to method for this little extra stitch is to use the right- and left-leaning the "Lifted increase" method. After picking up your heel flap stitches on the first side, put your RH needle tip into the right hand leg of the stitch below the first stitch on the instep needle and knit it letting it move to the RH needle.

Knit the instep stitches, then make a left-leaning lifted increase by inserting your LH needle tip into the left leg of the stitch below what WAS the last instep stitch before you knit it just now. In other words, it will appear as the 3rd stitch down now. Knit this and let it be the first stitch on your needle. Now, pick up your heel flap stitches on the second side. Voila! Got No Holes!

kwiltkween wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:59 AM

My advice is to read the advice of experienced sock knitters, try out their suggestions, then use what is most comfortable for you.

Carneyes wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:58 AM

I am a fairly new sock knitter.  I have tried previously and was not pleased with results.  I decided to go to my LYS and take a class.  I am now hooked on socks and love the process.

PianoJanet wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:56 AM

To avoid ladders at join, knit 3 or 4 rows flat then join for knitting in the round.  Sew together.

bigbrown wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:56 AM

Start at the toe, then rip back if it isn't fitting the recipient just right.  This save having socks that don't fit and maybe not knitting the second one!

gailyates wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:54 AM

My advice is to makes friends with an experienced knitter who can help you if you get stuck.  It's fun to get together, have tea, visit and, of course, knit!

KarenG@50 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:52 AM

I prefer using bamboo needles, because they don't slip out and get lost as easily as metal ones.

Wedding shower present: I've been giving handmade socks to the bride & groom "To help keep you from getting cold feet!"

maryannbn wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:46 AM

I always use Jeny's Surprisingly Stretchy Bind Off on my cuffs. I have invested time and love in creating my socks and I want the bind off to be perfect.

foxtrotter wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:42 AM

When joining the cast on stitches for a cuff-down sock, cast on one additional stitch. Then, after joining in the round, knit or purl this added stitch together with the first cast on stitch. No unsightly "dip" in your cast on edge!

valtst wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:39 AM

When knitting one sock at a time I make notes on the pattern with number of rows, stitches etc.  so I can make the second sock the same.

cgeyarn wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:37 AM

Make sure you like the way the sock yarn feels against your skin!  I have made a couple of pairs because I loved the colors or self-striping pattern in the sock yarn only to discover that I can't wear them because they make me ITCH!

on Apr 19, 2014 10:32 AM

Love knitting socks from the toe up!

on Apr 19, 2014 10:32 AM

Love knitting socks from the toe up!

crlebrn wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:32 AM

I usually mark how many rows I knit at each part of the pattern that says how many inches are needed. This way I am able to make the next pair a little easier as long as the yarn is the same gauge.

crlebrn wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:31 AM

I usually mark how many rows I knit at each part of the pattern that says how many inches are needed. This way I am able to make the next pair a little easier as long as the yarn is the same gauge.

GraceT@5 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:30 AM

Knit what feels good on your feet.  If your feet are not comfortable you will not be, no matter how pretty the yarn!

gginastoria wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:25 AM

To prevent a tight cast on, I use two  needles and pull the extra one out when I join for knitting in the round.

Krum wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:24 AM

Since I am new at knitting socks the best tip I could give is to use  a 9" circular. It makes the project very portable friendly without worrying about loosing a double pointed kneedle when knitting away from home. ;)

sandra.yk wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:22 AM

My most important hint is to remember that there are videos out there for everything! I have been saved many times by finding a video to help me figure out a technique.

My suggestion is to make your first pair of socks out of worsted weight yarn. Easier to see what you are doing and goes much faster since their are significantly fewer stitches. I make 2 at a time on one circular needle.  

Since I do not like seams at my toes or I found toe up to be much better for my needs. Be careful with the bind-off since you want to be able to get them on when you're finished.

DebbieW wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:15 AM

Priscilla Wild's No Muss No Fuss No Wraps No Holes Short Row Heel was introduced to me by Charisa Martin Cairn in her YouTube video. I went on a whirlwind of baby and toddler sock-making with nary a care. There are many wonderful heel-turning patterns but, as Charisa states, Priscilla's 'great recipe' is a quick, simple method for producing a great product with a beautiful result. :)

pmprdlady wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 10:13 AM

I knit both socks concurrently. I set one up on double point needles and knit the cuff, and then knit the 2nd cuff on another set of double points. I do this with each section. That way I know that they are the same, because it is easy to compare and I just did the other part so I remember. Also, I don't have 2nd sock syndrome. I am usually at about the toe (or cuff if I am doing toe-up) on the second sock when I finish the first one.

on Apr 19, 2014 10:01 AM

I use a steno notebook to keep track of my rows.  The center line splits the page and I can note what changes or adaptations I made to the pattern at a specific point (gusset, decreases on the even rows, etc.) on the first sock and then breeze through the second sock because I have all the info on the other side of the page.

Linda Nelson wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:53 AM

When working Kitchener stitch on toes, treat first two stitches and last two stitches as one stitch, to avoid those funny ears:) This advice came from Ann Budd's sick class.

Krum wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:48 AM

As I'm very new at sock knitting the only tip I can give is that It really helped me to use the 8" circular needles for the body of the sock, It made it much more portable and I didn't have to worry about loosing a double pointed kneedle when knitting away from home :)

Polly Doodle wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:45 AM

Use 2 circular needles and keep the heel stitches on one, instep on the other.  No markers or ladders!

rblakeney wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:41 AM

My best advice is to try using a 9" or 8" circular needle. I love being able to just go 'round and 'round. It makes my sock knitting all that much more portable.

Lady A wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:40 AM

This is a great kit. It's enough to motivate me, a non-sockier, to want to learn to speak fluent sock.

Polly Doodle wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:38 AM

By using 2 circular needles, you always have the heel stitches on one, instep on the other and no ladders!

on Apr 19, 2014 9:36 AM

If you are an exclusively top down knitter, try toe up.  I just started my first toe up and I'm so in love with the toe cast on and the short row heels that I know I will be forever alternating between the two!

on Apr 19, 2014 9:34 AM

If you are an exclusively top down knitter, try toe up.  I just started my first toe up and I'm so in love with the toe cast on and the short row heels that I know I will be forever alternating between the two!

elaine730 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:27 AM

I seem to be very clumsy knitting in the round with DP needles, so switched to the Magic Loop method and love it!

sweetie41 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:26 AM

My tip for sock knitting is Norwegian purling. When I first started knitting socks, my stitches on the heel were always bigger than the rest of my sock. The remedy was Norwegian purling, because it makes a tighter stitch, making my little v's look smaller so they have the same tension as the rest of my sock.

on Apr 19, 2014 9:24 AM

If you are stepping up to a "next sock" -- something a bit more challenging for yourself -- consider taking some steps to make it easier to understand.  

For example, moving from simple 3x1 rib pattern socks to an 8 stitch pattern with ktbl, which looks just a little bit different, was hard for my fledging skills at "reading the kitting" so I constantly losing my place and had to fall back to counting.   But putting in place markers, even though the pattern didn't call for them, has helped so much!!  One at the end of each 8 stitch pattern, at least until I get more comfortable with them.

I can see at a glance that I haven't lost and stitches, that I'm at the end or beginning of a pattern repeat and I'm watching the pattern grow from a position of understanding it so much better.  Won't need them by the end, but it's such a help at the beginning!

EllenH@28 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:23 AM

Always keep a pair of socks-in-progress with you in your bag or backpack whenever you leave the house.

PamieSue1 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:23 AM

Save the purple flannel bag that Crown Royal Scotch comes in.  It makes a great bag to hold your sock yarn.  Sock yarn is lightweight and you can hang the bag from your arm.  You can even walk while you knit.  Multi-tasking at its best!

PamieSue1 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:22 AM

Save the purple flannel bag that Crown Royal Scotch comes in.  It makes a great bag to hold your sock yarn.  Sock yarn is lightweight and you can hang the bag from your arm.  You can even walk while you knit.  Multi-tasking at its best!

scjd wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:16 AM

Happy Easter.

st33y0tch wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:15 AM

Well, I don't know if this falls under advice or not, but here it goes. I recently took the time to make socks for my boyfriend. As I was nearing completion, I asked him to try them on. I was surprised to find that his ankle was a lot larger than I had expected on his long and lean frame. My advice: take the time to familiarize yourself with the feet you will be working for.

st33y0tch wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:14 AM

Well, I don't know if this falls under advice or not, but here it goes. I recently took the time to make socks for my boyfriend. As I was nearing completion, I asked him to try them on. I was surprised to find that his ankle was a lot larger than I had expected on his long and lean frame. My advice: take the time to familiarize yourself with the feet you will be working for.

wwmachnik wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:12 AM

Knit both socks together on two DP needles. Once I got the hang of it, I didn't have to count or keep track of my transitions. I no longer add to my collection of single unmatched socks.

pazia82 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:10 AM

I am new to sock knitting.  My advice is to stay relaxed and don't let the DPNS scare you off.  Also try knitting two at a time socks with two circulars, looks crazy out off control at first.  But once you get the hang of it.  And you complete your first pair of sock at one time.  Oh, what a great feeling!  

pazia82 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:09 AM

I am new to sock knitting.  My advice is to stay relaxed and don't let the DPNS scare you off.  Also try knitting two at a time socks with two circulars, looks crazy out off control at first.  But once you get the hang of it.  And you complete your first pair of sock at one time.  Oh, what a great feeling!  

Jsimmonsnsd wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:07 AM

When I am doing toe up two at a time socks on two round needles I have two balls of wool to look after. ( or one big one working from both outside and inside ). To keep sane and untangled I put the wool in ziplock bag (s) just leaving enough open to let the wool escape as I need it . When I get most of the foot done and using two balls , I tuck the wool into the toe of each sock. Ne'er the twane shall meet(or tangle) .

Sanity stays and less time wasted on untangling the wool.

Jsimmonsnsd wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:07 AM

When I am doing toe up two at a time socks on two round needles I have two balls of wool to look after. ( or one big one working from both outside and inside ). To keep sane and untangled I put the wool in ziplock bag (s) just leaving enough open to let the wool escape as I need it . When I get most of the foot done and using two balls , I tuck the wool into the toe of each sock. Ne'er the twane shall meet(or tangle) .

Sanity stays and less time wasted on untangling the wool.

KariF@3 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:05 AM

When making a sock that has an intricate pattern, I place a stitch marker at the start of every pattern repeat, that way if I make a mistake and am not sure where I need to be, I just go to the end of the last repeat and start over there. I also ALWAYS place a life line at the start and end of the heel and also one at the start of the toe.(Obliviously for toe up socks I place it at the end of the toe.)   For each of these things, if I make a mistake, it is easier to just take out the part with the error instead of taking the mistake out row by row. And of course, when making socks one at a time, I write how many rows it takes to make the pattern, toe, heel, etc.

psprowl wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:04 AM

Never give up, never give in. You will thank yourself later.

mejarrett wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 9:03 AM

My "Tip for the Day" is two knit both socks at the same time.  It doesn't matter what method you use (toe up or top down, magic loop, dpns, or 9" or 12" circulars) if you do them both at the same time, the second sock will be finished at almost the same time as the first.  I use 9" circulars and buy 2 of each size.  Knit each step on one needle, then switch needles.  Be sure to mark which is sock one and sock two.

on Apr 19, 2014 9:02 AM

Make socks snug, they fit better in your shoes than loose ones and stay up better.

gcarpntr wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:59 AM

Always carry an extra needle if you are using DPNs. It is nearly impossible to retrieve a dropped needle from between the seats while sitting in a moving car.

CarolL@35 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:44 AM

If you don't knit both socks back to back, make sure and check your gauge when you get back to the second sock. I have one pair that are completely different sizes. I still wear them though!

harpspun wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:44 AM

Here's my knitting tip of the day - to make your sock knitting truly "on the go", get a very small pouch bag with a long drawstring, and place your sock yarn in it. Then loop the handles over your wrist, and you can knit and walk at the same time! It's also handy as a project storage bag as well.

Bonus points if you knit your own bag to put your project in!

laureen227 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:40 AM

Try the Fish Lips Kiss heel ($1.00 on Ravelry)! Easiest heel, imo-makes knitting sox much easier & faster-so you get to wear them sooner!

nlg2 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:39 AM

My best advice (to myself) is to stop collecting sock yarn and start knitting socks, already!!

DebW@25 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:38 AM

My favorite tip is actually about the heel. When knitting the flap, knit the first 4 stitches like this: slip 1 as if to purl, knit the next 3. Then proceed with whatever stitch you choose for the flap to the last 4 stitches, knit the last 4. When you pick up the stitches for the rest of the sock, pick up only the inside loop of that slipped stitch. In other words, instead of picking up both legs of that edge stitch, pick up the leg that is the inside leg, not the one on the very edge. The result? You'll get a nice little "chain" along the garter stitch edge. Some people call this  French heel, but I have no reference on that. Try it!

on Apr 19, 2014 8:36 AM

I love knitting socks TTAAT.  To minimize tangling of the two skeins, I put each (center-pull) skein inside a sock. Yarn does not roll around as much in my project bag.

Carol Bunting

Robin@8 wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:23 AM

Start with baby or toddler socks.  You'll learn all the basics, get instant results and fit isn't crucial.

on Apr 19, 2014 8:19 AM

When teaching new knitters how to make socks, I always encourage them to do it the old-fashioned way: top-down, turned heel, grafted toe. This way they have a huge appreciation for the craft plus learn some very important skills: knitting on dpns, picking up stitches for the heel gusset, kitchener stitch. However, as soon as they have done that, it’s two-at-a-time on one circular needle, toe up, with a short-row heel. This way is really much more expedient. I recommend the Turkish cast-on as it’s easy and makes a nice-looking toe.

Sandy Lid wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:14 AM

Try to always knit the first stitch on a needle.  It stops the sock from getting "ladders", or loose stitches.  Knitters tend to automatically pull knit stitches tighter.  If need be, the knitter can get into the habit of pulling the stitch tighter.

judydunn wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:12 AM

I started out making socks from the top down, but had trouble with fitting, and with running out of yarn. Making toe up socks makes it easier for me to avoid these problems, and it is easier for me to cast of loosely, as opposed to casting on with enough stretch to make the socks easy to pull on. Judy's Magic Cast on rocks for socks!

judydunn wrote
on Apr 19, 2014 8:12 AM

I started out making socks from the top down, but had trouble with fitting, and with running out of yarn. Making toe up socks makes it easier for me to avoid these problems, and it is easier for me to cast of loosely, as opposed to casting on with enough stretch to make the socks easy to pull on. Judy's Magic Cast on rocks for socks!

nana2013 wrote
on Apr 18, 2014 10:58 PM

As a beginning sock knitter the best suggestion I can offer is practice, practice, practice.  Don't give up.  You will get it and then be thrilled once that ah ha moment comes.  Happy knitting.

nana2013 wrote
on Apr 18, 2014 10:57 PM

As a beginning sock knitter the best suggestion I can offer is practice, practice, practice.  Don't give up.  You will get it and then be thrilled once that ah ha moment comes.  Happy knitting.

AngelaAlter wrote
on Apr 18, 2014 4:05 PM

Rather like the gradeschool drill of "stop, drop and roll" I'd say, "Stop, measure and check." On the cuff - check every couple of inches that your stitch count is correct. Amazing that you can 'lose' a stitch in even a simple rib pattern. On the foot - check your row count by weaving a strand of contrast yarn every 5 rows (or pick your favorite number) to keep track... having one sock substantially longer than the other is so annoying. And... on the second sock - especially when the first one fits so well - check your needle size before beginning. (You DID write it down, right?) I couldn't believe how much smaller Sock #2 was (was I THAT tense?)... until I realized Sock #1 was on a US Size 2.... and I'd knit all of #2 with... 2mm. Sigh. It's still in my UFO box. [For you newbies, 2mm is a US Size 0. Still don't know how I managed that one!]

ElleneMc wrote
on Apr 18, 2014 1:40 PM

Rather than using the generalized sizes offered in sock patterns, knit a swatch to find your gauge, then use a formula to create sizing unique to the sock recipient. Works every time.

TianC wrote
on Apr 17, 2014 8:19 PM

My advise is to work a cuff taller than 2" to stay up better and to keep knitting socks. The first one will not be perfect, but it gets better.

on Apr 17, 2014 1:07 PM

Be patient, practice, measure often. Also, enjoy the process! If it's not fun, it's not worth your time. You can always put your socks down, & go back to them some other time.

on Apr 17, 2014 12:24 PM

I think the best advice is to knit lots of socks.  :-)

M. Edelson wrote
on Apr 17, 2014 9:53 AM

Wether you knit cuff down or toe up, try the socks on as often as possbile while knitting to ensure the best fit.

on Apr 16, 2014 3:56 PM

I make socks that totally fit my feet by making all the toe shaping on the left side for the left sock and on the right side for the right sock.  My socks are amazingly comfortable -- like a warm hug for your feet.

Titus213 wrote
on Apr 16, 2014 1:57 PM

The next time you want to knit a pair of socks, have the person you will be knitting for stand on a piece of paper and with a pen or pencil out line their foot.  You will have most of the measurements you need except for the length of the leg part of the pattern - which is their choice.  Donna Williams

on Apr 16, 2014 9:52 AM

I'm scared to try creating socks, so I've been watching 'Knitting Daily' for their how-to's...some day, I WILL overcome and defeat the process !!!

on Apr 16, 2014 9:49 AM

I'm scared to try creating socks, so I've been watching 'Knitting Daily' for their how-to's...some day, I WILL overcome and defeat the process !!!

lerounds wrote
on Apr 16, 2014 8:43 AM

Two pieces of advice.  Try the magic loop method of toe up sock knitting if you are afraid of "all those needles"!  I learned socks that way and don't think I would want to do it any other way, except maybe top down!  Also, the fuzzier your sock yarn, the pill-ier it will get; just be aware.

4bookworm wrote
on Apr 16, 2014 7:22 AM

My best sock knitting advice, hmmmmmmmm. Just relax and enjoy the process. If you can knit socks then you can knit anything else that comes your way. Also, master your Kitchener stitch, it isn't hard once you get the hang of it.

jjmouratis wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 5:49 PM

I learned on DK weight yarn with size 4 needles and it made it much easier. After doing my first pair, my second pair with the exact same pattern turned out beautifully -- except that I used self-striping yarn, which I discovered doesn't look as attractive across ribs. A lot of sock knitting is trial and error, from discovering the best yarn to fixing the little gap that forms at the gusset. Just be open to exploring and proud of every incremental improvement.

AnnB@2 wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 5:36 PM

My best advice is the next time you get together with family - measure their feet.  A ladies medium doesn't always fit a medium lady with wide feet but if you know everyone's exact measurements you can usually adjust the pattern easily to make a custom fit. Measure their calf  and instep circumference as well as the length of foot and preferred length up the ankles.  Everyone likes knowing that you cared enough to make something just for them and I've noticed that gifts tend to be worn more since I started this.  

OrchidFire81 wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 4:46 PM

My tip would be to frequently try on your sock as you are knitting it, helps you catch any fit errors before they get too bad.

texlady wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 4:12 PM

If knitting toe-up, be sure to use an extra stretchy bindoff.  Nothing is worse than a beautiful pair of sock that you can't wear because the cuff is too tight.

texlady wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 4:09 PM

I really enjoy Sockupied; so many great patterns!  The one thing I would change is for you to add written instructions in addition to the charts for your designs.  My old eyes have a problem with charts and I will often write them out myself rather than try to follow as I'm knitting.

Anonymous@2 wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 3:14 PM

The thought of turning heels may be the #1 hurdle keeping some knitters from trying socks, or give sock knitters a bit of a pause when encountering a new method. I mean, it's got to be really, really complicated, right?Well, no it isn't. And you don't have to knit a whole sock to prove it to yourself. Just cast on, knit about an inch, do the heel turning, then another inch. You've not only mastered the heel, but you've made a swatch as well. You can either unravel to use the yarn again, or even keep it and build a collection of sample heels to refer to when you start designing your own patterns.

tlwarner wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 1:49 PM

My best advice is read the yarn label carefully. When I started knitting socks I thought I could wash them like the store-bought socks. After one wash, my socks shrunk so bad they became my granddaughter's socks.

yetunde wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 12:23 PM

Gauge is important if that is not right all is lost sock either to big or to small

yetunde wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 12:21 PM

Gauge is important if that is not right all lost

KYfarmgirl wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 12:15 PM

I'd love to see more patterns, tips & tricks for using colorwork on socks without making them non-stretchy &  hard to fit.  Ways to make floats loose enough so the sock stays up and feels snug; alternative stitches to give the effect of colorwork but without the non-elasticity of fair isle; ways to add colors beyond basic stripes.  

Thanks for the great giveaway!  

on Apr 15, 2014 11:59 AM

My best advice is to have a sister that will knit socks for you.

youngec wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 10:14 AM

If I have a really complicated pattern or am making a lot of modifications, I like to knit both socks at once using either two circular needles or the magic loop.  It seems to take forever to finish (since you're doing both at once), but it absolutely ensures that both socks come out the same.

mshembree wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 8:58 AM

My two best tips are magic knot and Russian grafting.   The magic knot is an unbelievable way to join yarn and Russian grafting is so much easier then the kitchener stitch that you wonder why anyone would do a kitchener stitch when they can do Russian grafting.

Marfisa wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 8:18 AM

My best advice is to listen to the recipient and make the socks they would love, not you would love. You may not like the color or the pattern, but to the person who receives them, they'll be the best socks in the world.

Also, actually knit the socks. And keep knitting more, because someone who loves your socks will wear them out quicker than you think.

Gairns wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 6:43 AM

Sizing is key. Make sure you have the right fit or all that hard work and sock loveliness goes to waste sitting in a drawer

Gairns wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 6:43 AM

Sizing is key. Make sure you have the right fit or all that hard work and sock loveliness goes to waste sitting in a drawer

RareJewel wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 3:32 AM

Find a yarn that doesn't make you itch.

jennyeileen wrote
on Apr 15, 2014 12:01 AM

I'm trying a method new to me (I cant be the first person to think of it!) and am excited to see if it helps with Second sock syndrome. I am knitting cuff down to toes with after thought heels, six extra rows (locking stitch marker to mark beginning of both sets of toe stitches) then toe up with afterthought heels.  Kitchener both toes. I'm not sure how it will work out and may run some crochet thread when I work each toe to save which stitches to pick up.

lykkemeg wrote
on Apr 14, 2014 9:34 PM

If you have thicker legs double the number of sts at the top.  If you start at the co double the number of sts and then k2tog on the first round.  If you end at the top then on the last round k1m1, then bind off after that.  It looks a little wavey but it normalizes when you wear them.

KathyM@93 wrote
on Apr 14, 2014 7:15 PM

I tell everyone that socks are just simple arithmetic.  Figure out your cast on number, the heel flap is worked on half of those, the heel turn is based on half of the heel flap number, you decrease until you're back to the cast on number, and then stop about 2 inches short to begin the toe decreases.  Nothing could be easier!

Joan Brown wrote
on Apr 14, 2014 6:42 PM

My best sock advice is just knit socks and they are fun to make.

Joan Brown wrote
on Apr 14, 2014 6:41 PM

My best sock advice is just knit socks and they are fun to make.