Episode 107: Almost Edible

Jul 1, 2008
Did you know you could knit with corn? Crochet with tofu? On the menu at Knitting Daily TV we look at edible foods that these unique fibers. We take a close examination on their properties, how they’re made, and how to use them to make beautiful projects.

Getting Started: Deborah Knight and Kim show us some edible yarns, such as yarn from corn, bamboo, tofu, and even seaweed.
Designer Spotlight: Robin Melanson joins Eunny to show off her recent work and demonstrate the “Rusalka” gloves made from Sea Silk
How-To: Kathy Elkins and Shay demonstrate a yummy scarf project made form cotton and soy yarn.
You Asked It: Liz examinations fibers made from edible sources, their origins and properties, and how they react to spinning or other use.
Knit Along: Sela Smith and Kim begin a new progressive project – the Coffee House Sweater from designer Melissa Leapman.


107-1 Almost Edible, Getting Started

Download information from Yarn Market

Deborah Knight from Yarnmarket.com visits with Kim about yarns and fibers available on the market today made from edible, or almost edible, sources, such as tofu, bamboo, and even seaweed. All yarns shown on this segment are available online at www.yarnmarket.com. Download a complete listing of the yarns showcased.

Yarnmarket.com
c/o Yarn Market, LLC
12936 Stonecreek Drive, Unit D
Pickerington, OH 43147
(888) 996-9276
(614) 861-7223
Orders@yarnmarket.com

www.yarnmarket.com

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107-2 Almost Edible, Designer Spotlight

pdfDownload Robin's Mitts

 

Robin Melanson, coauthor of Knitting New Mittens and Gloves (Stewart, Tabori and Chang, 2008) (http://www.hnabooks.com/product/show/31024), visits with Eunny about her recent design work. She also demonstrates a pair of fingerless mitts from her book, made of soy silk yarn. Download the pattern for these mitts.

Unicorn Books & Crafts
1338 Ross Street
Petaluma, CA 94954
(800) 289-9276
(707) 762-3362
help@unicornbooks.com
www.unicornbooks.com
*Unicorn Books & Crafts is a leading distributor of needlework and textile craft books.

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107-3 Almost Edible, How-To

pdfDownload Sublime Soya Cotton DK Scarf

Kathy Elkins from Webs yarn store visits with Shay about this easy, lacey scarf knit with cotton and soy silk yarn. She also demonstrates the importance of "life lines" while knitting. Download the Sublime Soya Cotton DK Scarf pattern. All materials for this scarf can be found at www.yarn.com.

WEBS, America’s Yarn Store
75 Service Center Road
Northampton, MA 01060
(800) FOR-WEBS (367-9327)
customerservice@yarn.com
www.yarn.com

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107-4 Almost Edible, You Asked It

Carmen from Grand Forks, ND, asks “How do they really make yarns from food?” Liz examines how food becomes fiber, with a focus on hemp, flax, tencel, soy, bamboo, seaweed, and corn. All fibers and yarns shown in this segment were provided by Louet North America, www.louet.com.

Louet North America
3425 Hands Road
Prescott, ON, Canada
K0E 1T0
(613) 925-4502
Info@louet.com
for pattern support, e-mail Lynda@louet.com.
www.louet.com

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107-5 Almost Edible, Knit Along

pdfDownload the Coffee House Sweater

Sela Smith from Fiesta Yarns visits with Kim about the first steps in The Coffee House Sweater, a design by Melissa Leapman for Fiesta Yarns. Download the Coffee House Sweater pattern.

See step 2 of the Coffee House Sweater, sleeve construction (Segment 109-5)
See step 3 of the Coffee House Sweater, crocheted buttons (Segment 111-5)

Fiesta Yarns
5401 San Diego NE
Albuquerque, NM 87113
(506) 892-5008
CustomerService@fiestayarns.com
www.fiestayarns.com

Purchase this episode on DVD!


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Comments

SuzanneL wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
To all WGBH-TV viewers in the Boston market: Email the station at access@wgbh.org to request they pick up the show. I just did. If they have a lost of requests, maybe we will get what we want! Suzanne Scituate, MA
Elaan wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
Please Fiesta Yarns, include a photo of the item to be made in your PDFs! I won't make it if I don't know what it looks like!
EstherL wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
I downloaded the pattern for Robin's Mitts, but when I tried to print it out, part of it wouldn't print. It's too large for 8 1/2 X 11 inch paper. Will I have to use 11 X 14 inch paper or is there another way to copy it? I second the motion on including photos of items. Those items sponsored by WEBS also don't include photos.
RobertaS wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
I want to second or third or fourth the suggestion to include pictures of the finished pattern. I usually can imagine a scarf or square from instructions, but I cannot do this for something as complex as a sweater. I cannot view the TV program and am limited to following the show online. Therefore, I have no idea of the appearance of finished items except for the small and inadequate pictures with program summaries. The show is great as far I can tell online; I know you are tweaking the program for future show. Please make this addition. Roberta Indianapolis
Cindy@5 wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
I don't know if it would work, but have you tried to print in "landscape" instead of "portrait" under "orientation" ? It prints your page on 11 X 8 1/2 inch so you have short wide pages instead of what you are used to seeing. I haven't tried printing the Robin's Mitts pattern, but this worked on other things I tried to print that were too wide for an 8 1/2 X 11 inch piece of paper. Cindy G Carrollton OH
JudyE wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
Would you please consider leaving a picture of the garments you allow the viewers to knit. Thanks.
mgross wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
need help with the fingerless mitt pattern for the right hand. I need the reverse explained stitch by stitch, onlyfor the placement of the right palm and right thumb. I am not a very good knitter. thank you. melanagross@bellsouth.net
knittingteen wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
I've never knit lace before, and I was wondering how I would knit the scarf above narrower, the stitches are done in sets, so it is confusing for me to try to understand how to make it narrower.
VirginiaA wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
I agree I think its much better to see what you're knitting .Please a picture .
PeggyS@3 wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
Include a Picture. I don't make everything right away, it may be months before I look at a pattern again. A picture would be great.
despinne wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
The recent trend to charts for knitting may be nice for some, but my eyes cross when I try to read them--dyslexia. Pictures help because I can see what the charts mean. Please use the written instructions as well as a chart. Also, I know the Washington DC area is practically a desert wasteland when it comes to needle/fiber arts, but most of us do have cable TV we could watch--if one is not at work. Joan Griffith
Mary@13 wrote
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
Could you please tell me how to find a way to convert the mit pattern to crochet I do not knit.
on Jul 1, 2008 1:14 AM
First time to watch the show... had a bit of trouble finding the correct site on web . HOpe it works for me. I tend to forget details after a few minutes...Donna Mae
on Aug 17, 2009 1:56 PM

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on Mar 2, 2012 10:35 PM

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