Sweater Knitting Patterns: Favorites from 20 Years of Knits

Sweater Knitting Patterns: The Dickinson Sweater is a favorite for anyone who loves cables.
The Dickinson Sweater by Kathy Zimmerman, from Knits Fall 2007

Interweave Knits is 20 years old! Can you believe it? Knits was the first knitting magazine I discovered, and I fell in love with it. I got a subscription immediately, and I’ve thoroughly enjoyed every issue. When I got my first issue, Pam Allen was the editor, and I loved her classic style. Eunny Jang followed Pam, and her approach was wonderful, too, bringing technical knitting know-how and high-fashion looks to the magazine. Lisa Shroyer added her touch after Eunny, with her fantastic colorwork and a lifetime of knitting knowledge to the magazine.

Now Meghan Babin is at the helm, and she’s steering Knits in a wonderful direction, full of cozy cables and classic silhouettes, always with a nod towards style.

I asked our team of editors to choose a project from Knits that really stood out to them. Here they are to share some of their favorite sweater knitting patterns.

Meghan’s Choice: Dickinson Pullover

My favorite design from Interweave Knits is the Dickinson Pullover by Kathy Zimmerman from Interweave Knits Fall 2007. This issue premiere at the dawn of my knitting life and pushed me to become a better knitter. I instantly fell in love with many patterns in the issue, including the Cobblestone Sweater by Jared Flood, the Tangled Yoke Cardigan by Eunny Jang, the Tyrolean Stockings by Ann Budd, but most of all, the gorgeous cables of the Dickinson Pullover.

Very soon after receiving the Fall 2007 issue, I went to my LYS and purchased yarn far out of my price range. I swatched carefully, cast-on gleefully, and began knitting my first real sweater. It was magical, and what made it so magical was that I was doing something I had never done before and doing it without fear.

Interweave Knits has made me the knitter I am today and I owe much to this publication that has fostered me from a fledgling knitter all the way to editor of Interweave Knits.

—Meghan Babin

The Spoked Cardigan is one of our favorite sweater knitting patterns from 20 years of Interweave Knits.
The Spoked Cardigan by Carol Feller, from Knits Weekend 2011

Spoked Cardigan by Carol Feller

Kathleen asked for one favorite pattern, which was a tall order for me. I’ve read Interweave Knits since its earliest days, and many designs stand out in my memory. I literally remember where I was when I saw the first issue—in a yarn shop in Santa Barbara, California, pretending I didn’t have a dissertation to write.

One project does stand out, however, because I’ve made it before and I’m about to make it again. Carol Feller’s Spoked Cardigan (from Weekend Knits, 2011) marked my first adventure with self-striping yarns. Since I wanted the color sequence to be consistent, this sweater gave me the chance to experience balls wound backwards, starting and stopping at the underarms and shoulders to keep the stripes lined up, and so on.

My first version turned out well—I still get compliments on it, five years later. But it’s pilled badly and the neckline has stretched out of shape. I plan to reknit it in a new colorway as a pullover. This endeavor will challenge me to match row gauge (which I usually fudge or skip completely) and to devise a new engineering plan. I expect to get even more compliments if I can pull this off.

—Deb Gerish, Editor, Love of Knitting

The Harding Cardigan is one of our favorite sweater knitting patterns from 20 years of Interweave Knits!.
The Harding Cardigan from Knits Summer 2016

The Harding Cardigan by Linda Marveng

Picking only one favorite from 20 years of Interweave Knits sweater knitting patterns is no easy task.  I took my first knitting class at a local yarn shop with my mom when I was about eight or nine—right about when Knits got its start! I’ve admired the magazine and the beautiful clothing you can make from it for most of my life; every issue gets better and better.

My favorite Knits pattern right now has to be the Harding Cardigan designed by Linda Marveng from Interweave Knits Summer 2016. I haven’t had the chance to make it yet, but come fall, it will be the first thing I cast on!  It is perfect for wearing around the Interweave offices and it reminds me of the Colorado mountains.

I love the Harding Cardigan—cooler temperatures can’t come soon enough!

—Sara Dudek, Assistant Editor, knitscene

Sweater Knitting Patterns: The Verchères Pullover is a sweater you'll wear constantly!
Verchères Pullover by Heather Zoppetti, from Knits Winter 2014

Verchères Pullover by Heather Zoppetti

It’s a tough question to answer, but one of my favorite Interweave Knits sweater knitting patterns HAS to be the Verchères Pullover by Heather Zoppetti, the cover project from Knits Winter 2014. It’s a henley-style sweater with a short column of buttons at the base of the neck, and it’s knit in a beautiful allover textured pattern.

This was my very first Interweave photo shoot, and I had so much fun watching the whole process come together. I love the sweater because it’s knit with Lorna’s Laces Sportmate, which is made with wool and Outlast, a viscose material with thermal properties that regulates temperature.

I also love the rust color of the sample in the issue. When the sample was still in the office, I tried it on and it fit so well and was so comfortable and soft. Naturally, I want to knit one for myself in green!

—Hannah Baker, Editor, knitscene

The Caftan Pullover is one of our all-time favorite sweater knitting patterns.
The Caftan Pullover by Norah Gaughan

The Caftan Pullover by Norah Gaughan

I knit the Caftan Pullover several years ago, as part of a Knitting Daily knit-along, and the pattern remains one of my favorites. We all had so much fun making this gorgeous top together. It was really helpful to have others to bounce ideas off of, because a few of us made some modifications to the pattern.

I didn’t always want to have to wear a tee under my Caftan, so I sewed up the front almost all the way. I also left off the buttons on the points of the cables, and added an I-cord edging to the neckline.

I admire Norah Gaughan so much. She has such a knack for combining cables, stitch patterns, and construction methods to come up with gorgeous and unique garments.

I wear my Caftan Pullover all the time, and I get so many compliments on it. I’m so looking forward to taking it out of the cupboard this fall, steaming it to freshen it up, and then wearing it all season.

—Kathleen Cubley, Editor, Knitting Daily

Sweater Knitting Patterns: The Hirst Pullover from Knits Fall 2016 is a stunner.
The Hirst Pullover by Ruth Garcia-Alcantud

Hirst Pullover by Ruth Garcia-Alcantud

My very first issue I worked on at Interweave was the 20th anniversary edition, which was an awe-inspiring start.

My favorite pattern from this issue is the Hirst Pullover by Ruth Garcia-Alcantud. Though I’ll never have the courage to don those leather pants, I just adore this sweater. It’s perfect for any season (depending on the yarn you use) and it’s so stunning; it will turn any pair of jeans you thrown on into what I call the ever-elusive concept of an “outfit.”

I know when my knitting skills (and confidence) improve to the point of colorwork and full garments, this will be the very first thing I make.I hope you enjoy the Hirst Pullover as much as I do.

—Sarah Rothberg, Assistant Editor, Interweave Knits

As you can see, there are so many beautiful patterns that have graced the pages of Interweave Knits.

As we kick off the 20th anniversary of Knits with the Fall 2016 issue, you’ll see more new and classic patterns featured here, and lots of how-to articles and skills for you to add to your knitter’s toolkit.

I hope you’ll download one of these great patterns today, and don’t forget to put the the 20th Anniversary Issue in your shopping cart! See below to get a peek at the patterns in this issue.

Cheers,

1KCsig

P.S. What’s your favorite sweater knitting pattern from the last 20 years of Knits? Leave a comment below and share it with us!

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Kathleen Cubley

About Kathleen Cubley

Hello daily knitters! I'm the editor of Knitting Daily. I've been obsessed with knitting for about ten years now and my favorite projects are sweaters. I like the occasional smaller project, but there's nothing like yards of stockinette with a well-placed cable or a subtle stitch pattern here and there. I crochet a bit now and then—especially when I need to produce a baby blanket in time for the baby shower. I've been in publishing for 20 years and I'm finally exactly where I want to be: at the crossroads of knitting and communication. I live in Spokane, Washington and when I'm not knitting I enjoy gardening, snuggling with my dogs, swimming, reading, and playing in the snow in the winter. But, really, I'm pretty much always knitting!

3 thoughts on “Sweater Knitting Patterns: Favorites from 20 Years of Knits

  1. This is, so far, the best newsletter article!! I have so many favorite sweater patterns from Knits, so it’s hard to pick one. However, my favorite ‘project’ is the Plein Air Tote (Fall 2010)! My daughter saw it, I suppose in Pinterest, and asked me if I could make it for her. She was in need of a tote that could be large enough to carry her laptop and papers. The knitting was the easy part but I decided to take it to another level. I designed the lining with several different size pouches, some with zippers, to hold her accessories. Not only was this a fun project for me, but she enjoyed going to the store and picking out her color scheme (bright yellow yarn with a navy, paisley, cotton lining). She has worn it out!! When she goes to presentations, it’s a hit with the audience!

  2. I don’t often leave comments but this is a great blog post. I love most of Kathy Zimmerman’s patterns. I’ve wanted to knit almost everyone I’ve ever seen. My favorite is Welcome Back, Old Friend from Fall 2000. I knit it in alpaca and the finished product is definitely like having “a comfortable old friend.”

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