Learn Something New: The Sea-Foam Stitch

There are lots of things in knitting that are deceptively simple, and the sea-foam stitch is one of them. It's a beautiful stitch that mimics the undulating movement sea foam makes as it lies on top of the water.

This stitch is formed by wrapping the yarn around the needle numerous times between stitches and then dropping the wraps as you knit the next row.

Knitting Daily TV episode 904 showcases the sea-foam Stitch. Here's Eunny to show you how it's done:

I learned this stitch a few years ago when I worked at a yarn shop. We worked up a scarf model using the sea-foam stitch and a skein of beautiful, shimmery, silk variegated yarn. I lost count of how many people saw that scarf and immediately bought the yarn and asked for the pattern. It was a perfect case of a stitch pattern perfectly showcasing a yarn.

The shawl featured in the video is the Ironwork Shawl by Tara Miller, from the Spring 2012 issue of Interweave Knits magazine. Beautiful, right?

Here's the stitch pattern:

Sea-Foam Stitch Pattern
(multiple of 10 sts + 6)

Rows 1 and 2: Knit.
Row 3: K6, *[yo] 2 times, k1, [yo] 3 times, k1, [yo] 4 times, k1, [yo] 3 times, k1, [yo] 2 times, k6; rep from *.
Row 4: *K6, drop 2 yo off left needle, k1, drop 3 yo, k1, drop 4 yo, k1, drop 3 yo, k1, drop 2 yo; rep from * to last 6 sts, k6.
Rows 5 and 6: Knit.
Row 7: K1, *[yo] 2 times, k1, [yo] 3 times, k1, [yo] 4 times, k1, [yo] 3 times, k1, [yo] 2 times, k6; rep from *, ending last rep k1 instead of k6.
Row 8: K1, *drop 2 yo off left needle, k1, drop 3 yo, k1, drop 4 yo, k1, drop 3 yo, k1, drop 2 yo, k6; rep from *, ending last rep k1 instead of k6.
Rep Rows 1-8 for patt.

Search your stash for a fabulous skein of silky yarn—I think this stitch looks best with a slippery yarn—and cast on a sea-foam–stitch scarf today!

And check out the rest of the fun drop-stitch ideas in KDTV episode 904: "Oops—I Dropped It!"; it's on sale!

Cheers,

P.S. Do you have a favorite drop-stitch knitting pattern? Tell us about it in the comments!

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Knitting Daily Blog
Kathleen Cubley

About Kathleen Cubley

Hello daily knitters! I'm the editor of Knitting Daily. I've been obsessed with knitting for about ten years now and my favorite projects are sweaters. I like the occasional smaller project, but there's nothing like yards of stockinette with a well-placed cable or a subtle stitch pattern here and there. I crochet a bit now and then—especially when I need to produce a baby blanket in time for the baby shower. I've been in publishing for 20 years and I'm finally exactly where I want to be: at the crossroads of knitting and communication. I live in Spokane, Washington and when I'm not knitting I enjoy gardening, snuggling with my dogs, swimming, reading, and playing in the snow in the winter. But, really, I'm pretty much always knitting!

15 thoughts on “Learn Something New: The Sea-Foam Stitch

  1. I am working on a “Morning Scarf” using that same stitch pattern. It was a bit tricky when I first started but now that the rhythm is there it is truly a great scarf pattern

  2. I love the Seafoam Stitch! When I was in Italy, I bought some gorgeous variegated yarn and when I got home, I searched for a scarf pattern to show off the rich colors. The Seafoam Stitch was the answer, and it came out stunning! I think more knitters should know about it – it’s so much fun to knit it and watch the waves take place! Thanks for showcasing it.

  3. The Pamuya Shawl by Alexandra Wiedmayer uses a variation of this stitch she
    calls Wave Pattern. You can find it on Ravelry.com.
    I did it in Findley Dappled yarn from Juniper Moon Farm in the Driftwood color

  4. I seem to remember seeing this pattern used for a scarf pattern at a local shop. I nearly succumbed to buying the yarn, and knitting up the scarf…and I’m not a scarf person. I don’t knit scarves. Really. But I was nearly cast under the spell just because the yarn was pretty and the pattern dazzling.

  5. This is a most lovely style of knitting… It makes a gorgeous curtain drape across a window. I used a fine twine and made such a cute curtain-thing across our beach house window.! The textures and the hole look wonderful with the view beyond!

  6. This is a most lovely style of knitting… It makes a gorgeous curtain drape across a window. I used a fine twine and made such a cute curtain-thing across our beach house window.! The textures and the hole look wonderful with the view beyond!

  7. On my needles now. A summer top in a Danish DK yarn, a linen,/ cotton/ acrylic mix. Quite thin and “slubby” The drop stitch pattern as follows. Row 1. Knit 2, purl 2. along required stitches.Row 2 repeat row one as in a K2 P2 Rib
    . Row 3. Knit 2,P 2,K1 M1 K1,P2,K2,P2 K1M1K1 p2, repeat.
    Row 4 Knit 2,P3, K2,P2 ,K2,P3,K2 and so on.
    Work a further5 rows, following stitch formation.
    On 10th row, drop the made stitch down 7 rows,
    Work row 1 and 2 again
    Repeat rows 3 to 10 but on the alternate columns of 2 knits. The pattern says M1 by picking up a running thread and knitting thro’ the back, but I find a backward twist unravels easier.The finished fabric is very attractive. I hope it looks as good on the knitter!

  8. I made a scarf with a seafoam pattern. You can find it on Ravelry. Drop Stitch Scarf by Christine Vogel. I used a variegated green yarn and it really turned out nice.

  9. I made a scarf using a variation of this stitch by Barbara Breiter at Knitting on the Net. It adds a row of eyelets after every 2 sections of waves (so a 12-row rep), which looks like bubbles on the water. I used a white specialty yarn with tiny loops all along it, so the end result looked really “foamy”!! It was beautiful and soft. I gave it away, but have lots of the yarn left so I think I’ll make one for myself. I like the idea below of using this stitch for curtains, especially for a cottage or beach house, or any window looking out on water.

  10. I used this pattern looong time ago to knit a baby dress, i lost the pattern but always thought about it. I think, I will use it for a baby dress again..
    thank you for it… hildebt

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