TAGS: Knitting

  • Knitting Traditions Spring 2015

    Welcome to the Amazing Adventures edition of Knitting Traditions! It’s all about explorers and adventurers—some were attempting to reach the North or the South Pole, others to circumnavigate the globe. Not all of them were men.

    In her article, “Knitwear for Polar Explorers,” Angharad Thomas examines the exploits of a number of famous explorers, including Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton. She notes, “To study accounts of polar exploits is to become overwhelmed by the descriptions of the harshness of the physical conditions the expeditions encountered.”

    Two American women who experienced those conditions firsthand were Josephine Peary and Jackie Ronne. Josephine Peary first traveled with her husband, Robert Peary, to the Arctic in 1891. Author Kathy Augustine writes, “[Josephine] forged ahead on a path of unyielding support for her husband, whether by his side in the frozen north or from the warmth of her parlor where she entertained sponsors.” In 1947, Jackie Ronne became the first American woman to reach Antarctica, with knitting needles and yarn in tow. For twelve months, she and her husband, expedition leader Finn Ronne, lived in a 12-foot (3.7-m) square hut.

    This is just the tip of the iceberg (pun intended!). Many other compelling stories and twenty-one stand-out projects—socks, sweaters, mittens and gloves, hats and balaclava, a scarf, and a shawl—await you.

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  • Knitting Traditions Fall 2014 Preview

    In PieceWork’s ninth edition of Knitting Traditions, we explore the practical and creative evolution of knitting. Beginning with a visit to the Orkney Islands, we learn how gansey and lace stitch designs evolved there both through everyday life and because of its particular geography. Then we sail to The Netherlands where, through the colorful lives of fisherfolk, ganseys and their stitch patterns developed into a rich Dutch tradition full of its own symbolism and history.

    And there are other sorts of adaptions in this issue. You will discover how one knitter used an eighteenth-century embroidery pattern as inspiration for a stunning colorwork mitten design. Another knitter translated a 1920s golf stocking pattern into a stylish, yet practical, liner for a pair of Wellington boots. And yet another knitter acquired an intriguing pair of slippers at a farmer’s market that were knitted in Iran with handspun yarn. She reverse engineered a sweet pattern perfectly connecting cultural tradition with contemporary design. Galina A. Khmeleva combined elements of Orenburg knitting with Scandinavian design to create the gorgeous shawl that graces our cover.

    In this issue, I hope that you’ll discover your own knitting connections through the people and their land, the culture, the history, and best of all, the beautiful knitwear.

    Enjoy!

     

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