PieceWork May/June 2013

 

Welcome to PieceWork’s annual look at the magical world of lace! This issue offers fascinating facts on lace—knitted, needle, bobbin, tatted, crocheted, and machine-made. You’ll discover some people who have been captivated by lace and others who spent long, grueling hours producing this ethereal fabric.

Margaret Stove explores the history behind a “Shetland Knitter in New Zealand” and provides the pattern for her stunning knitted Shetland Scarf. Delve into the life of the children who created bobbin lace in the 17th century, and the chants they recited as they worked in “Spinsters, Free Maids, Tells, and Shakespeare.” Make your own exquisite needle-lace insert, using the same traditional stitches that students and teachers used to create an altar cloth for the Sacred Heart Sanctuary in 1927. For tatters, there are instructions for making an edging and a medallion, along with the inspiring story of Lily Mae Burley Patrick, who continued to be a master tatter although she was blind. For many Russian women, receiving a gift of a traditional Orenburg warm shawl was a highlight. Galina Khmeleva shares her pattern for this lacy labor of love. And there’s so much more to discover in this special issue all about lace. There is just something about lace!

 Editor of PieceWork

 

 

PROJECTS



 



An Orenburg Warm Shawl to Knit
Galina A. Khmeleva




An Endowing Purse
to Make

Christopher John Brooke Phillips






Shell Lace to Knit




 

 
DEPARTMENTS AND FEATURES

 
      Departments/COLUMNS

  • Notions: Letter from the editor
  • By Post: Letters from the readers
  • Calendar: upcoming events
  • TRIMMINGS: A sampling of vintage patterns
  • Abbreviations, Techniques & Definitions

    ONLINE EXTRAS

    Visit pieceworkmagazine.com for free projects and articles, the PieceWork index, back issues,
    recommended books, and much more.



Features
Volume XXI Number 3

GRANNY CHEYNE: A SHETLAND KNITTER IN NEW ZEALAND by Margaret Stove

LILY MAE BURLEY PATRICK, MASTER TATTER by 
Delores Chase

OF HEROES, HOOKS, AND HEIRLOOMS by Faye Silton 

LISL SCHUHMANN’S LACE TABLECLOTH by Ellen Rothschild-Taube

SPINSTERS, FREE MAIDS, TELLS, AND SHAKESPEARE by Christopher John Brooke Phillips

LEAVERS LACE: THE ARISTOCRAT OF TEXTILE FABRICS by Susan J. Jerome  

AEMILIA ARS AND THE TWELVE PROMISES IN LACE by Jeanine Robertson

LAURA INGALLS’S KNITTED PETTICOAT LACE by Mary Lycan

SUSAN B. ANTHONY AND A LETTER ABOUT LACE by Susan Strawn


 


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