TAGS: Knitted Shawls

  • PieceWork May/June 2014

    In this issue, you’ll discover lace traditions from England, Ireland, Italy, Russia, India, America, and Japan. Articles and projects cover knitted, tatted (both needle and shuttle), crocheted, and bobbin lace.

    Isabella Campagnol’s “Invisible Lacemakers” takes you to Venetian monasteries in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, where nuns (and even some repenting prostitutes) produced exquisite lace. Isabella notes, “Monastic authorities encouraged the practice of needlework for the acclaim that it bestowed on the monastery, because it offered purpose to the nuns’ otherwise dull existence, and, not least, for the profits derived from the sale of its lace, which were essential in maintaining the monasteries.” Just one more illustration of the powers of lace.

    Lace as a means of survival is the focus of Christopher Phillips’s “Victoria’s Passion,” as he relates how the queen’s commissions for lace from localities that had fallen on hard time “often provided income that was much welcomed.” These royal commissions extended throughout the United Kingdom even as far as Malta, an island nation in the Mediterranean that was part of the British Empire from 1800 to 1964. Whatever the form of lace—bobbin, needle, knitted, or crocheted— Victoria championed them all.

    Enjoy. I do hope this special issue will make you want to wrap yourself up in lace!

     

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  • PieceWork March/April 2014

    From time immemorial, red has played a role in the lives of people across the globe. Those roles and the lengths people have gone to produce the color red are fascinating.

    In “Red: The Universal Color,” Mary B. Kelly discusses the significance of red for the Estonian Setu. The women embroidered ritual cloths and clothing with red thread and “referred to their embroideries as ‘red scripts’ in reference to the symbols that covered them.” Irina Stepanova presents a traditional Russian towel stitched by her maternal grandmother, Tatiana D. Romanenkova, in 1929, when she was eight years old. Worked on handwoven linen, the towel has bands of red-and-gray cross-stitch. We owe a debt of gratitude to all needleworkers, past and present, who have chosen the color red, whether for its symbolic meanings or out of personal preference. Needlework, worked in red or not, is certainly a “tradition not to be forgotten.”

     

     

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  • Knitting Traditions Fall 2013

    The seventh edition of PieceWork’s Knitting Traditions is all about lace—its magic and mystery and its ethereal quality—as expressed in knitting." —Jeane Hutchins, editor

    Enjoy 148 pages filled with knitted lace perfect to knit in the summer and fall months. Find stunning stoles, scarves, shawls, an entire section with lace patterns from Victorian England, and lacy edgings, doilies, socks, and more. In addition to new patterns designed for this edition, our archives yielded a selection of older lace patterns that are no longer widely available. Plus, indulge in the inspiring and informative companion stories that frame the knitted lace projects in historical context.

     

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