TAGS: Knitting Patterns + Knitting Techniques

  • Unofficial Downton Abbey Knits

    Look through the eyes of Downton Abbey with this new special issue from PieceWork magazine. Enjoy knits inspired by the lavish sets and styling of the hugely popular television series, which tells the story of the Grantham clan and their servants at England’s Downton Abbey.

    This special issue will include:  Knitted garments and accessories—gloves, shawls, sweaters and vests, blouses, hats, purses, and more—for both those upstairs and downstairs. Learn about knitting for the troops during World War I and enjoy articles detailing aspects of the Downton eras:  fashion, history, and culture.

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  • PieceWork March/April 2013

    Until the invention by Johannes Gutenberg of automated movable type in A.D. 1452, the number of people worldwide who could read remained very small, the vast majority of them wealthy members of society or clergy. To communicate with nonreaders, pictures were used. These might be painted on canvas (the word "picture" comes from the Latin word pictus ("painted"), or, as you'll see in this March/April 2013 issue of PieceWork, executed in needlework. From among the countless possibilities, we've selected examples from seventeenth-century elaborate raised embroidery ("From Raised Embroidery to Stumpwork: Four Centuries of Dimensional Needlework"), motifs on a christening robe ("Exquisite Whitework: The Arbroath Robe"), some of the charted images used in filet crochet ("A History of Filet Crochet: Creating Pictorial Designs"), and the ubiquitous knitted eight-pointed star/flower/snowflake motif (One Knitted Motif, Many Names"). Projects include a sweet knitted cardigan for baby, a stumpwork dragon, and the knitted pincushion that received the grand-prize in PieceWork's 2012 Pincushion Contest.
    Motifs, symbols, drawings, secret messages--all are included in this March/April 2013 issue. The adage "One picture is worth a thousand words" continues to ring true. Enjoy!

     Editor of PieceWork

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  • PieceWork January/February 2013

    This is PieceWork’s seventh annual Historical Knitting issue! A few highlights: Working with Priscilla Gibson-Roberts was a dream come true. Both of us are indebted to the Martin Fellows Hatch family for lending us the stunning Armenian sock (circa 1840–1860) for study and photography. Priscilla’s colorful adaptation of the original graces our cover; complete instructions and charts are provided. I’d always wondered about polka jackets. Were they named for the dance? Who wore them? When? All these questions and more are answered in Helen Bonney’s article on the polka knitting craze. By 1849, a polka jacket, a tiny waist, and a voluminous skirt covering layers of crinolines were the pinnacle of fashion. Helen transcribed instructions for a knitted polka jacket from an 1849 pattern. Carol Rhoades rewrote the instructions for today’s knitters and knitted our sample. Galina Khmeleva once again shares her extensive knowledge of and love for Orenburg knitting, this time with traditional mittens for men and boys. And when we learned of the adventures of the English Captain Burnaby on his unauthorized trip to Russia and his encounter with Orenburg knitting in 1875, we knew we had to include it here. There’s much more. Each article and project in this issue adds to knitting’s illustrious history. Have a glorious time discovering it. I certainly did!

         Editor of PieceWork

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