TAGS: Knitting + Lace Knitting

  • PieceWork May/June 2014

    In this issue, you’ll discover lace traditions from England, Ireland, Italy, Russia, India, America, and Japan. Articles and projects cover knitted, tatted (both needle and shuttle), crocheted, and bobbin lace.

    Isabella Campagnol’s “Invisible Lacemakers” takes you to Venetian monasteries in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, where nuns (and even some repenting prostitutes) produced exquisite lace. Isabella notes, “Monastic authorities encouraged the practice of needlework for the acclaim that it bestowed on the monastery, because it offered purpose to the nuns’ otherwise dull existence, and, not least, for the profits derived from the sale of its lace, which were essential in maintaining the monasteries.” Just one more illustration of the powers of lace.

    Lace as a means of survival is the focus of Christopher Phillips’s “Victoria’s Passion,” as he relates how the queen’s commissions for lace from localities that had fallen on hard time “often provided income that was much welcomed.” These royal commissions extended throughout the United Kingdom even as far as Malta, an island nation in the Mediterranean that was part of the British Empire from 1800 to 1964. Whatever the form of lace—bobbin, needle, knitted, or crocheted— Victoria championed them all.

    Enjoy. I do hope this special issue will make you want to wrap yourself up in lace!

     

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  • Knitting Traditions Spring 2014

    In PieceWork’s eighth edition of Knitting Traditions, we pay tribute to determined individuals and an array of cottage industries and cooperatives that have turned to knitting for income.

    In this issue, you will meet Ceceila, a Cowichan knitter in western Canada who recalls knitting into the early hours of the morning by candlelight, knowing the sweater she finishes for sale will keep her children from going hungry; and James Moar, an invalid in 1880s Shetland, who learned to knit from his sisters, so he could contribute to the family income. You will discover the powerhouse stocking knitting trade that flourished in Wales for over two hundred years and the knitting cottage industries of Macedonia that have thrived from the nineteenth century to the bustling markets of today. You also will meet the Swedish social reformer, Berta Borgström, who formed a knitting cooperative to help women in need and to preserve her country’s traditions. Enjoy their amazing stories and over 20 companion projects to knit!

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  • PieceWork March/April 2014

    From time immemorial, red has played a role in the lives of people across the globe. Those roles and the lengths people have gone to produce the color red are fascinating.

    In “Red: The Universal Color,” Mary B. Kelly discusses the significance of red for the Estonian Setu. The women embroidered ritual cloths and clothing with red thread and “referred to their embroideries as ‘red scripts’ in reference to the symbols that covered them.” Irina Stepanova presents a traditional Russian towel stitched by her maternal grandmother, Tatiana D. Romanenkova, in 1929, when she was eight years old. Worked on handwoven linen, the towel has bands of red-and-gray cross-stitch. We owe a debt of gratitude to all needleworkers, past and present, who have chosen the color red, whether for its symbolic meanings or out of personal preference. Needlework, worked in red or not, is certainly a “tradition not to be forgotten.”

     

     

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  • Knitting Traditions Fall 2013

    The seventh edition of PieceWork’s Knitting Traditions is all about lace—its magic and mystery and its ethereal quality—as expressed in knitting." —Jeane Hutchins, editor

    Enjoy 148 pages filled with knitted lace perfect to knit in the summer and fall months. Find stunning stoles, scarves, shawls, an entire section with lace patterns from Victorian England, and lacy edgings, doilies, socks, and more. In addition to new patterns designed for this edition, our archives yielded a selection of older lace patterns that are no longer widely available. Plus, indulge in the inspiring and informative companion stories that frame the knitted lace projects in historical context.

     

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  • Knitting Traditions, Fall 2012: A PieceWork Magazine Special Issue

    Here's a glimpse of what's in Knitting Traditions Fall 2012.  This is the 5th edition of this special issue from the editors of PieceWork.

    Jeremina Robertson Colvin left her home in the Shetland Islands in 1885 for Cowichan Station in British Columbia, Canada. When Jeremina met Mary Edwards, a Cowichan, the two women formed a bond that remained steadfast throughout their lives: knitting played a major role in their friendship.
    Jeremina and Mary's story is just one of many compelling accounts in this fifth edition of PieceWork's Knitting Traditions. Other passionate knitters whom you'll meet include Cornelia Mee, a nineteenth-century English author of knitting books and certainly one of the first knitting entrepreneurs, and the American poet and knitter Virginia Woods Bellamy, who received a patent for her "Number Knitting" in 1948.
    You'll also learn how the surprise discovery in an antiquarian bookshop of a color illustration from a nineteenth-century French book led a designer to develop her Bavarian Leg Warmers project. Our nine vintage patterns (six sweaters, a hat and scarf set, and pair of mittens) were knitted using the original instructions from vintage magazines. They are reproduced here exactly as they originally appeared.

    It seems that knitting traditions and connections are everywhere, sometimes in the most unlikely places.

     

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