can several stitches at the side of a sweater be removed, totally?

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moonquilter wrote
on May 21, 2012 11:02 PM

I knit the back as directed...and put it away.  Then on the front I didn't keep checking the pattern, and forgot to do the five stitch decrease for about four inches.  It was a difficult pattern for me, so I thought I could figure out a way to remove those stitches, or just include them in the seam..but that would put a "flap" inside the sweater.

I thought worse case that I'd sew a line of stitches with my sewing machine, then cut those stitches off.

I'm hoping that there might be some other way to remove them???  Has anyone any ideas?

Thank you,  Vickie aka moonquilter

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ZassZ wrote
on May 22, 2012 9:55 PM

Hi Vickie,

I understand your dilemna and suggest what you are describing that you may decide to do is called "steeking"  Type in the word steek in the search box at top right of page and you will get alot of posts that relate to this subject.  I think it wouldn't hurt. 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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on Jun 14, 2012 7:02 AM

While steeking would not hurt, have you considered the following -

Are the "forgotten stitches" too far down in the work to just pull it out and redo the section?

Maybe doing it the hard way will remind you to check the pattern in future. Don't misunderstand - I'm definitely not trying to be cheeky. I'm just speaking from experience, having ripped and re-knit sections myself after making a mistake too big to ignore. After agonising then just doing it, I have become a much better planner and a more meticulous knitter because I simply can not be bothered to have to do that amount of mistake-clean-up ever again! (Just thinking about ripping and redoing large sections motivates me to make gauge swatches, double check my maths, reread the pattern, etc!)

So, I hope I haven't sounded like a matron - just sharing my experience in the hope that it helps. Stick out tongue

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ZassZ wrote
on Jun 26, 2012 7:43 PM

Askhouse, 

I agree and that is also why I can always take the time to read and understand a pattern.  However, I have no patience or respect for publishing houses that sell patterns that need correcting after the customer purchases.  I do not have the time, nor am I inclined to want to hunt around, search for corrections after the fact.  If I am following the directions correctly and the pattern is wrong, then I also have to rip and am not going to be happy about time wasted. 

There I have said my "piece" ha ha.  Wink   

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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salmonmac wrote
on Jun 27, 2012 5:12 PM

You know, we've all been there. You can think of all possibel ways around it but basically it comes down to frog it and do it right. I find that otherwise, I'll always see the mistake. My system is to rip it out and get it over with (this is like pulling off a Ban-Aid) and then leave it for the next day to start afresh. Yes, it's compulsive, but it makes me happy in the end.

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ZassZ wrote
on Jun 27, 2012 5:38 PM

So agreeing with:

askhouse01:
having ripped and re-knit sections myself after making a mistake too big to ignore. After agonising then just doing it, I have become a much better planner and a more meticulous knitter because I simply can not be bothered to have to do that amount of mistake-clean-up ever again! (Just thinking about ripping and redoing large sections motivates me to make gauge swatches, double check my maths, reread the pattern, etc!)

Right you are - and I hate to riip but admit that while i'm riiiping it does feel good to know I am getting rid of the mistake that I too, know I will not be able to ignore in future.  So I just DO IT.  Crying 

And agreeing with: 

salmonmac:
You know, we've all been there. You can think of all possibel ways around it but basically it comes down to frog it and do it right. I find that otherwise, I'll always see the mistake.
 

I find I don't mind riiiping it nearly as much; if it is MY mistake, rather than the author's mistake in the pattern.  Then I go nuts!  And I don't need to be any nuttier  ha ha  Confused

Well let's all hope we won't have to be doing any riiiping in near future.  So I guess we beat this topic to death,so what's next?

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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ZassZ wrote
on Jul 29, 2012 11:13 PM

hi Vickie (moonquilter),

so what did you do to remedy the situation?  Just curious if it turned out well for you. 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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