THE OFFICIAL PAN-AM JACKET KNIT-ALONG POST

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Posts 55
AdeleDS wrote
on Jul 16, 2012 10:53 AM

marhar:

I do not think I have mastered the pattern yet!!  I am fine with rows 2-4 of each increment, but for the 1st row, it is very hard.  I know the pattern is 16 rows, but how many stitches?

This might help or it might muddy the waters for you - but I look on the pattern as having two different rows, 9 stitches per repeat, and 5 fairly easy-to-follow rules.

There are just two types of RS row:

Row A: ONE, two, two, two, two (repeat to end of row)

Row B: THREE, two, two, two (repeat to end of row)

There are five rules:

Rule 1: With each new number you switch from knitting to purling or vice versa. So Row B can be K3, p2, k2, p2  or  P3, k2, p2, k2. With Row A, since it has an odd number of elements you will wind up alternating between K1 and P1 when you do your ONE stitch. So Row A, if it starts with a Knit stitch, will go K1, p2, k2, p2, k2, P1, k2, p2, k2, p2 (repeat the whole thing down the row)

Rule 2: The WS rows always just follow what you did on the RS. Changes of any kind (including increases) only happen on the RS row.

Rule 3: You repeat each row four times before switching from Row A to Row B or vice versa.

Rule 4: After four rows the place where you change from knit to purl budges over one stitch, and you switch from either Row A to Row B or vice versa. The THREEs will sit overtop of your ONEs from the previous section, with one stitch on either side of the ONE. (or else the ONES will sit in the middle of the THREEs)

Rule 5: A knit stitch or a purl stitch in any location is repeated 8 times before it changes. So you can tell where you are in the pattern by looking down the stitch column.

All you really have to do is to figure out which row you're knitting and where the pattern repeat starts. After that you can just knit along chanting One, two, two, two, two, or THREE, two, two, two in your head.

Hope this helps.

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Posts 18
on Jul 16, 2012 4:41 PM

AdeleDS:

marhar:

I do not think I have mastered the pattern yet!!  I am fine with rows 2-4 of each increment, but for the 1st row, it is very hard.  I know the pattern is 16 rows, but how many stitches?

This might help or it might muddy the waters for you - but I look on the pattern as having two different rows, 9 stitches per repeat, and 5 fairly easy-to-follow rules.

There are just two types of RS row:

Row A: ONE, two, two, two, two (repeat to end of row)

Row B: THREE, two, two, two (repeat to end of row)

There are five rules:

Rule 1: With each new number you switch from knitting to purling or vice versa. So Row B can be K3, p2, k2, p2  or  P3, k2, p2, k2. With Row A, since it has an odd number of elements you will wind up alternating between K1 and P1 when you do your ONE stitch. So Row A, if it starts with a Knit stitch, will go K1, p2, k2, p2, k2, P1, k2, p2, k2, p2 (repeat the whole thing down the row)

Rule 2: The WS rows always just follow what you did on the RS. Changes of any kind (including increases) only happen on the RS row.

Rule 3: You repeat each row four times before switching from Row A to Row B or vice versa.

Rule 4: After four rows the place where you change from knit to purl budges over one stitch, and you switch from either Row A to Row B or vice versa. The THREEs will sit overtop of your ONEs from the previous section, with one stitch on either side of the ONE. (or else the ONES will sit in the middle of the THREEs)

Rule 5: A knit stitch or a purl stitch in any location is repeated 8 times before it changes. So you can tell where you are in the pattern by looking down the stitch column.

All you really have to do is to figure out which row you're knitting and where the pattern repeat starts. After that you can just knit along chanting One, two, two, two, two, or THREE, two, two, two in your head.

Hope this helps.

 

So true. It does sound like a lot of rules to wrap the head around at first glance, and it took me a while to figure it out. But that is really it in a nutshell, and I do exactly the same. The continuous roll over of the pattern keeps me on my toes (and awake, I might say). No room for boredom to set in. It also helps to have the pattern set out in front of you while knitting (like many here are doing).

Mine (the size I am knitting) is glued onto A4 cardboard pieces -  Right Front, Sleeve, Right Back, Left Back, Sleeve, Left Front - working from right to left on odd rows, and back from left to right on even rows. When not working on the sleeves (for example), I can take those patterns out, and make the working space smaller.

Each time I complete a whole row, I take a ruler and rule a line through it on all charts. Additionally I have notebook at my knitting desk with the row numbers, and cross them of when they are done (as a double check). Sounds like a lot of organization, but since I am doing that , I haven't been confused where the heck I am in the pattern, even when I had to put down the knitting quickly, and couldn't get back to it until very much later, at one stage days later. 

:)Henny

 

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Posts 89
dianajoknits wrote
on Jul 16, 2012 7:59 PM

ArtfulSoul:

Docdixon:
Could I impose on either of you to provide a paragraph explaining the border? I am having problems finding the information I need because there is a little bit here and there in the posts.

 

There are different issues that each of us will find on the border, so my paragraph is just to explain the general concept. And I'm not done yet, so hey, I'm just working this along with everyone else!

Pan-Am Continous Border concept. The only live stitches you have at that point are the hemline, which are on one needle.  You break the yarn at that point.  Start a new ball of yarn, and start as per pattern at top of left front edge to pick up stitches with your longest needle.  When you get to hemline stitches, just knit them off the other needle, and proceed in the round to make the Continuous Border.  Every odd number round, you will do miter increases on each of the 4 corners. After 8 rounds, you will put the neckline stitches on another needle (called Needle #2), and the rest of body stay on Needle #1.  Work Needle #1 fronts/hemline first back-and-forth for 6 rows, do not break the yarn, set aside.  Then work Needle #2 neckline for 6 rows back-and-forth, break yarn.  Go back to your Needle #1 and proceed as instructed to rejoin all in the round, with a K2tog joining the end stitches from your 2 needles. (I opted to move everything back onto one needle). YOU WILL NOW HAVE BUTTONHOLES on both ends (one buttons on the outside, one hidden on the inside)  Continuous Continuous Border, still mitering corners, until you get to a final round of all Purl, which is where this becomes Border Facing.

Border Facing, all stockinette, reverse-mitering the corners on every odd# round. After 5 rounds, again the neckline is worked seperately from the fronts/hemline in back-and-forth (to keep buttonhole openings).  The instructions disappear after this point, so the rest is my own plan.  The fronts/hemline facing is worked the same as the neckline.  At 2-1/2" or when it looks like your facing matches the width of your Continous Border width, you are done, and ready to sew down the ends on the inside.  This is where I have a plan not yet executed, that I will write about later...Huh? 

If you have a question that you know was addressed in an earlier posting, use the handy SEARCH box in upper right corner of page.  Type

Pan-Am, searchword  (that's Pan-Am, comma, the key word to search postings)

For instance, you could search Pan-Am, Continuous Border concept. to find this posting again (not sure how often indexed for newer postings, or try just "Pan-Am, continuous border", Pan-Am, border, etc)

Of course, even better, opt to receive new postings to this forum via email, and save ones you think you might need on your computer!

Okay, well, more than a paragraph, sorry.

This is a great explaination although it was too late for me - I wandered off on my own.  I will let you know in a day or two if it worked or if I am ripping.  I emailed the designer about this problem and this is what she replied:

re: Pan Am Jacket

Hi!

I’m thrilled that you’re knitting the Pam Am Jacket -- and so sorry that the pattern instructions are making you crazy!

I have the published instructions open here in front of me… To give a quick summary, there are two buttonholes, one worked in the upper corner of each front (right and left). These buttonholes are worked within the mitered increases seam st, so you are basically working them as two vertical slits, with the added complication of continuing the mitered increases that you’ve already established in the continuous border.

The first sentence under BUTTONHOLES gives instructions to divide the continuous border sts into two groups -- Needle 1 (which includes all the sts that run along the left and right front edges as well as the bottom edge), and Needle 2 (which has all the sts for the collar edge).

The first row of Needle 2 uses RLI/LLI increases to create an extra st at each edge of the buttonhole. These will disappear in the k2togs of the last buttonhole rnd (labeled “Next Rnd” in the pattern).

Let me know if this helps, or if I’ve only further muddied the waters…

Thanks!
Ashley Rao

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Posts 11
CarlineNM wrote
on Jul 16, 2012 8:06 PM

I have finished row 32, a huge accomplishment for me, since all I have ever knit before was a scarf.  In the directions for shaping the neck, it says:  "Cont shaping raglans and center back as described in Shaping Chart, with a 2-st selvedge at each front edge (1 sl st, 1 st in St st) through Row 51...."  What does this mean?  I got the sl 1 st purlwise at the beginning of each row, but this is the first I'm reading about a 2-st selvedge.   I have done rows 29 - 32 in keeping with what went on before, but am I missing something that I will regret later? 

A couple of observations:  If there is one quality knitters have in common, it has to be perseverance.  That characteristic is required in abundance if this pattern is typical of knitting patterns.  And if it is, I sincerely do not understand how anybody finishes anything without input from many other people. Second, I am in awe of anyone who is an experienced knitter; the needle management alone is nearly enough to finish me off.  At what point does it become natural to NOT get the yarn tangled in the circular needle?

Regarding the use of charts, I am completely befuddled.  The last project I did was a lacy type scarf which also used charts.  That chart used symbols for the different stitches, and all rows were read from right to left.  This chart relies on different colored squares with odd rows read from right to left and even rows read from left to right.  Is there no standard for charts?  If not, wouldn't it be nice if the directions included information about how the chart was to be read?  When I printed out the charts - even the larger ones - they were still too small to manage well, and the gray was so washed out that it was hard to see.  There were many different ways of dealing with this - that perseverance kicked in - and we managed to march on.  But since everyone participating in this KAL has a computer, wouldn't it be reasonable to have a separate chart for each size that we could download?  That way, all of those "sl 1 purlwise" stitches could be marked.  Surely it wouldn't be all that hard to put each size on a separate chart.  I could see publishing the book with the charts the way they are, but it shouldn't take much to include a URL where individual charts for each size could be downloaded.

That's my rant for the day.  On to row 33!

Carline 

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 388
ArtfulSoul wrote
on Jul 16, 2012 8:51 PM

CarlineNM:
A couple of observations:  If there is one quality knitters have in common, it has to be perseverance.  That characteristic is required in abundance if this pattern is typical of knitting patterns.  And if it is, I sincerely do not understand how anybody finishes anything without input from many other people.

 

Good for you in tackling this project!  It is NOT typical of sweater patterns.  I really only knit sweaters, and this one has its challenges. Glad you're with us as a group!

CarlineNM:
Regarding the use of charts, I am completely befuddled.  The last project I did was a lacy type scarf which also used charts.  That chart used symbols for the different stitches, and all rows were read from right to left.  This chart relies on different colored squares with odd rows read from right to left and even rows read from left to right.  Is there no standard for charts?

 

I think that charts are pretty standard.  Normally the reading all rows from right-to-left is when you are working in the round.  The chart is pretty much read in the direction that you knit (so that's why left-to-right when you turn and work back on the wrong side).

Well...keep on ranting...and knitting too!

Top 50 Contributor
Posts 89
dianajoknits wrote
on Jul 16, 2012 9:32 PM

CarlineNM:

I have finished row 32, a huge accomplishment for me, since all I have ever knit before was a scarf.  In the directions for shaping the neck, it says:  "Cont shaping raglans and center back as described in Shaping Chart, with a 2-st selvedge at each front edge (1 sl st, 1 st in St st) through Row 51...."  What does this mean?  I got the sl 1 st purlwise at the beginning of each row, but this is the first I'm reading about a 2-st selvedge.   I have done rows 29 - 32 in keeping with what went on before, but am I missing something that I will regret later? 

A couple of observations:  If there is one quality knitters have in common, it has to be perseverance.  That characteristic is required in abundance if this pattern is typical of knitting patterns.  And if it is, I sincerely do not understand how anybody finishes anything without input from many other people. Second, I am in awe of anyone who is an experienced knitter; the needle management alone is nearly enough to finish me off.  At what point does it become natural to NOT get the yarn tangled in the circular needle?

Regarding the use of charts, I am completely befuddled.  The last project I did was a lacy type scarf which also used charts.  That chart used symbols for the different stitches, and all rows were read from right to left.  This chart relies on different colored squares with odd rows read from right to left and even rows read from left to right.  Is there no standard for charts?  If not, wouldn't it be nice if the directions included information about how the chart was to be read?  When I printed out the charts - even the larger ones - they were still too small to manage well, and the gray was so washed out that it was hard to see.  There were many different ways of dealing with this - that perseverance kicked in - and we managed to march on.  But since everyone participating in this KAL has a computer, wouldn't it be reasonable to have a separate chart for each size that we could download?  That way, all of those "sl 1 purlwise" stitches could be marked.  Surely it wouldn't be all that hard to put each size on a separate chart.  I could see publishing the book with the charts the way they are, but it shouldn't take much to include a URL where individual charts for each size could be downloaded.

That's my rant for the day.  On to row 33!

Carline 

Hi Carline.  I love a good rant. Big Smile  I have knit sweaters, coats, lace shawls - this jacket has been a challenge for me and I probably am going to have to rip out my entire continuous border but I guess (hope) it will be worth it at the end.  That being said, I can turn you on to MANY fabulous sweater patterns that look lovely, fit well, can be adapted to multiple yarns and sizes and are a true pleasure to knit.  Unfortunately, this is not one of them (IMHO).  Of course, if I were to make it again, I would understand it better and it would go more smoothly. So maybe I will end up liking it in the end.  Right now, as I do battle with the border, I am not quite sure.  But, as you said, we persevere.  Some might call it an obsession but not me Wink 

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Posts 10
cazknits wrote
on Jul 16, 2012 9:42 PM

Re: Dianajoknits' earlier post about only having 42 back panel stitches instead of the stated 43 (size M) -- I had the same thing. I'm leaving it as is too - have you had any problems from doing this?

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Posts 5
laurym wrote
on Jul 16, 2012 9:44 PM

Carline,

I too am having a lot of trouble with this one.  Its a truly beautiful pattern but difficult to deal with.  And I've been knitting since the age of 9.  However, I am viewing this as a giant mountain to climb, and I hope to be viewing a thing of beauty when I'm done!

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Posts 89
dianajoknits wrote
on Jul 16, 2012 10:15 PM

cazknits:

Re: Dianajoknits' earlier post about only having 42 back panel stitches instead of the stated 43 (size M) -- I had the same thing. I'm leaving it as is too - have you had any problems from doing this?

i guess the answer is "no" but I had to abandon all those confusing numbers and just do my own thing with the border.  My numbers were close to hers but not exact.  Of course, i may be ripping - so I'm not the best authority Smile  i would say just take that into account in your calculations if you are going with the precise numbers. 

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 17
DMAllen wrote
on Jul 17, 2012 9:59 AM

Thank you for posting the chevron pattern---it was so helpful in doing my swatch......and helped me to learn the rhythm of the pattern.

 

PS--I am sure you have chosen your yarn by now---I haven't gotten through all the posts yet---but for the record, I like the purple (lilac?) or the charcoal.  :)

 

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Posts 388
ArtfulSoul wrote
on Jul 17, 2012 11:12 AM

Very, very, happy.  I've finished the Continuous Border and its facing. Photos below, also updated my notes on Ravelry (click on my Avatar and go to link in Announcements).

I was not fastidious about following pattern in the mitering.  I did a K1-f/b, and did not try to perfectly align Roman Ribs in the miter. So while I'm happy with how it looks in a busy stitch, some of you might prefer a neater line appearing.

 

And a detail of buttonhole (one in each upper corner), after a bit of finishing. Again, I wasn't trying to make a pretty line in the mitering. This area in particular will have a button covering it.

Finally, I offer a photo of finishing in process for the Border Facing.  I opted to keep live stitches. Pulled a thread of my yarn through them, one thread for each of the 4 sections (neck, 2 fronts, hemline). Pulled stitches to line up and pinned in a few places. With more of my yarn and tapestry needle, carefully sewed each live stitch into the body (pickup ridge for fronts/neck, and selected a row of purl bumps along hem).  In the event I missed one, no worry, my initial thread of yarn is staying put and will hold them.

So...now I'm redoing my first sleeve to make it bigger, then one more to match...I can see daylight at the end!!!!

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Posts 89
dianajoknits wrote
on Jul 17, 2012 6:08 PM

ArtfulSoul:

Very, very, happy.  I've finished the Continuous Border and its facing. Photos below, also updated my notes on Ravelry (click on my Avatar and go to link in Announcements).

I was not fastidious about following pattern in the mitering.  I did a K1-f/b, and did not try to perfectly align Roman Ribs in the miter. So while I'm happy with how it looks in a busy stitch, some of you might prefer a neater line appearing.

 

And a detail of buttonhole (one in each upper corner), after a bit of finishing. Again, I wasn't trying to make a pretty line in the mitering. This area in particular will have a button covering it.

Finally, I offer a photo of finishing in process for the Border Facing.  I opted to keep live stitches. Pulled a thread of my yarn through them, one thread for each of the 4 sections (neck, 2 fronts, hemline). Pulled stitches to line up and pinned in a few places. With more of my yarn and tapestry needle, carefully sewed each live stitch into the body (pickup ridge for fronts/neck, and selected a row of purl bumps along hem).  In the event I missed one, no worry, my initial thread of yarn is staying put and will hold them.

So...now I'm redoing my first sleeve to make it bigger, then one more to match...I can see daylight at the end!!!!

Wow.  How cool is that?  Great job!  I have finished my purl row and I'm doing the inside facing.  So the pattern completely ignores half of the facing, correct?  For the sewing down, I may do a sewn bind off rather than using lives stitches.  We will see.  I also decided to use a smaller needle for the facing.  I thought it worked well for the sleeves.  Great job and thanks for all your help. I will know soon if mine is going to work - fingers crossed. 

Top 50 Contributor
Posts 89
dianajoknits wrote
on Jul 17, 2012 6:08 PM

ArtfulSoul:

Very, very, happy.  I've finished the Continuous Border and its facing. Photos below, also updated my notes on Ravelry (click on my Avatar and go to link in Announcements).

I was not fastidious about following pattern in the mitering.  I did a K1-f/b, and did not try to perfectly align Roman Ribs in the miter. So while I'm happy with how it looks in a busy stitch, some of you might prefer a neater line appearing.

 

And a detail of buttonhole (one in each upper corner), after a bit of finishing. Again, I wasn't trying to make a pretty line in the mitering. This area in particular will have a button covering it.

Finally, I offer a photo of finishing in process for the Border Facing.  I opted to keep live stitches. Pulled a thread of my yarn through them, one thread for each of the 4 sections (neck, 2 fronts, hemline). Pulled stitches to line up and pinned in a few places. With more of my yarn and tapestry needle, carefully sewed each live stitch into the body (pickup ridge for fronts/neck, and selected a row of purl bumps along hem).  In the event I missed one, no worry, my initial thread of yarn is staying put and will hold them.

So...now I'm redoing my first sleeve to make it bigger, then one more to match...I can see daylight at the end!!!!

Wow.  How cool is that?  Great job!  I have finished my purl row and I'm doing the inside facing.  So the pattern completely ignores half of the facing, correct?  For the sewing down, I may do a sewn bind off rather than using lives stitches.  We will see.  I also decided to use a smaller needle for the facing.  I thought it worked well for the sleeves.  Great job and thanks for all your help. I will know soon if mine is going to work - fingers crossed. 

Top 50 Contributor
Posts 89
dianajoknits wrote
on Jul 17, 2012 6:08 PM

ArtfulSoul:

Very, very, happy.  I've finished the Continuous Border and its facing. Photos below, also updated my notes on Ravelry (click on my Avatar and go to link in Announcements).

I was not fastidious about following pattern in the mitering.  I did a K1-f/b, and did not try to perfectly align Roman Ribs in the miter. So while I'm happy with how it looks in a busy stitch, some of you might prefer a neater line appearing.

 

And a detail of buttonhole (one in each upper corner), after a bit of finishing. Again, I wasn't trying to make a pretty line in the mitering. This area in particular will have a button covering it.

Finally, I offer a photo of finishing in process for the Border Facing.  I opted to keep live stitches. Pulled a thread of my yarn through them, one thread for each of the 4 sections (neck, 2 fronts, hemline). Pulled stitches to line up and pinned in a few places. With more of my yarn and tapestry needle, carefully sewed each live stitch into the body (pickup ridge for fronts/neck, and selected a row of purl bumps along hem).  In the event I missed one, no worry, my initial thread of yarn is staying put and will hold them.

So...now I'm redoing my first sleeve to make it bigger, then one more to match...I can see daylight at the end!!!!

Wow.  How cool is that?  Great job!  I have finished my purl row and I'm doing the inside facing.  So the pattern completely ignores half of the facing, correct?  For the sewing down, I may do a sewn bind off rather than using lives stitches.  We will see.  I also decided to use a smaller needle for the facing.  I thought it worked well for the sleeves.  Great job and thanks for all your help. I will know soon if mine is going to work - fingers crossed. 

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 388
ArtfulSoul wrote
on Jul 17, 2012 6:33 PM

dianajoknits:
Wow.  How cool is that?  Great job!  I have finished my purl row and I'm doing the inside facing.  So the pattern completely ignores half of the facing, correct?  For the sewing down, I may do a sewn bind off rather than using lives stitches.  We will see.  I also decided to use a smaller needle for the facing.  I thought it worked well for the sleeves.  Great job and thanks for all your help. I will know soon if mine is going to work - fingers crossed.

 

Thanks dianajoknits!  Yes, the pattern fails to mention that Needle 1 is worked same as Needle 2.  Binding off the facing should work out super well, maintaining a loose tension.  I also made sure I had stretchy-ease in sewing it down, so that there is no stiffness for the outside.  I'm not quite to the sleeve facings yet, so you like using the smaller needle as recommended?  I don't perceive any issue with using the same needle for border facing...but then the A-line idea is accentuated also.  Fingers crossed for you too!

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