Vintage double knitting help

This post has 6 Replies | 1 Follower
Not Ranked
Posts 7
MinaC wrote
on Dec 27, 2008 11:43 AM

  I'm in a quandry and hope someone here can help.

I came across a vintage knitting book online, The Lady's Book of Knitting, found in the Antique Pattern Library online.  It's dated from 1886, and describes knitting as if it's done with one color, and one yarn instead of two.  Here is the exact wording:

'Cast on any number of stitches.
Knit a plain row.
2d row.--Slip the first stitch, knit the second in a usual manner, but put the thread twice round the needle.  Then bring the thread forward as if you were going to pearl, only do not pearl, but take the stitch off, and put the wool in front of the stitch back to its place.  Then begin again and knit a stitch with wool twice round the needle.'

I've tried following it, but I've only been knitting for two months, so it's a little confusing.  The online help and vids show two color reversible knitting, which doesn't sound like this at all.  Is there another name for the above and does it make sense to anyone who might be able to help make it make sense to me?

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 260
Tephra wrote
on Dec 28, 2008 10:05 AM

Well "k1, slip 1 with yarn in front" is a one strand, one color double knitting method, but I don't know why they are wrapping the knits twice. Do they do something interesting in row 3?

Not Ranked
Posts 7
MinaC wrote
on Dec 28, 2008 10:41 AM

   There is a row 3, but because it reads 'then begin again,' I assumed the 3d row might be a separate step done after you've gone across the 2d row.

The 3d row reads exactly:

'3d row.--Knit the first stitch.  Bring the wool forward, and take off the long stitch, putting the thread down in front.  Knit the short stitch, putting the thread twice round the needle.'

 I'm wondering if your k1, sl 1 wyif isn't the same thing, only theirs isn't written very well.  I tried experimenting, thinking it might make more sense if I was doing the knit stitch while reading it, and I only wound up with something that was increasing stitches without including any of the other stitches in the row.  If I'd continued it would have gone off into left field without ever finishing the row.

I'm really stumped, and the book goes into four pin (or needle I'm assuming) double knit.  Maybe looking at the original might help.  The page is 24, and the book is found here:

http://www.antiquepatterns.dreamhosters.com/0LadysBookKnitting.pdf

I do apreciate your trying to help.

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 260
Tephra wrote
on Dec 28, 2008 11:07 AM

Well the "on four pins" is definitely double knitting in the round but I have no idea what they are doing with those double wraps. All I can see happening is having double length stitches and my tension loosens up enough doing double knitting that I can't imagine why you'd have to double wrap.

Not Ranked
Posts 7
MinaC wrote
on Dec 28, 2008 2:04 PM

  Neither could I.  I'm familiar with crochet and only just started teaching myself to knit a couple months ago.  I figured it was something similar to a double yo that crochet has to make two loops, and knit them in a certain way.

  You don't suppose they meant to make two yo's, working them the same way you work the two yarns in normal modern double knitting do you?

Hope that made sense, but I'm wondering if that's what they meant.  I saw a vid showing two color double knitting, where one color was knit the other color was purled, which gave it a knit look on the opposite side.  If they're doing a double wrap yo, and working it the same way,...I don't know, I'm just guessing at this point.

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 260
Tephra wrote
on Dec 28, 2008 2:25 PM

I'm pretty sure they're just dropping the extra wrap to make longer stitches, since if you ignore the double wrap it's standard double knitting (though not very clearly written).

There are a lot of ways to double knit, the ones I use for one color and one strand seem to be the modern versions of these vintage ones. For flat double knit I k1, s1wyif across and then on the next row (which is really the second half of the previous row) knit the slipped stitches and slip the knit stitches. It makes a tube because the sides don't interlock. For in the round one color, one strand double knitting I k1, s1wyif for the first round and then s1wyib, p1 for the second.

I generally double knit with two colors so I don't slip anything, just knit in one color and purl in the other.

 

Not Ranked
Posts 7
MinaC wrote
on Dec 28, 2008 3:17 PM

  You're probably right.  I just couldn't find anything on double knitting that didn't use two colors, so I was lost on double knitting with one color, even in modern knitting.  The vintage pattern was referring to the double knit for making socks or stockings.  I assumed it made them extra thick for winter wear.

  Thank you so much! 

If it's just a badly written form of the modern version, it at least clears up how I can at least do a version of it :)

 

Page 1 of 1 (7 items) | RSS