THE OFFICIAL CENTRAL PARK HOODIE KAL POST!

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IamNadine wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 5:16 PM

I have not been good about doing a gauge, but recently have swatched until I get the right gauge. This link has good information about gauges.

http://www.vogueknitting.com/pattern_help/how-to/pattern_reading/gauge.aspx

 

Nadine

Nadine

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ArtfulSoul wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 5:44 PM

Re: Short Rows

Someone mentioned looking into short rows for shoulder shaping, which I already did.  I like doing the short rows, because then I can use a graft or 3-needle bind-off to join shoulders, it is so much smoother. HOWEVER, I did find that because the cables join at top front-to-back, then by my joining method, the seam gets a little stretched out.  Doesn't really bother me in the end, and probably better than a bulky sewing of cables together...but just a note to those who know what I mean.

 I use short rows frequently to get bust shaping, though not on this looser hoodie (I decided instead to make fronts slightly longer than back to get the ease (picked up in side seams). 

I used short rows to do hood shaping, again so I could join the top hood seam with 3-needle bind off method.  Really made a smooth seam, I will post pics soon, it is going to be a "current favorite" piece I think!

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JanieW@4 wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 6:09 PM

Thanks LamNadine,

I think I am ok. My gauge is right on but maybe a little off but for the good.  I went to the web site you suggested and I have that in my Vogue Knitting.  Plus I called a friend and that always helps. 

Again thanks for responding to my question about gauge.  Now I can get started. Yea!Smile

JJ

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Kelleigh wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 6:10 PM

Barbara,

Thank you sooo much for taking the time to assist me.  Right Hug  I was doing it wrong and have frogged the whole thing to start over.  I was doing the first two rows (1 and 2) at the beginning and then starting from the charts on the third row up to the 5th row and then going back to rows 1 and 2 of the written instructions. 

I think that I may have to write out the first part of the pattern, at least the first 10 rows, in long hand so I can get the hang of it.  I am so sad  Broken Heart that I don't know what to do.  I think it is for the best since I didn't like the regular cast-on and may now do a long tail cast-on.  What cast-on did you use? 

 

I knew that you would reach out to lend a hand and I do so appreciate you being in the world.  Thank you Barbara.  Guess I'll go brood a bit and then cast-on again. 

Carolyn

KELLEIGH~~

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Kelleigh wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 6:15 PM

Hi lorrainegd,

I have heard everyone say how easy it is but if you have never done anything like this, it is hard for a beginner.  I will do my best to pick up this new skill.  Thanks for responding to my post!  I appreciate your thoughts and time.

 

Carolyn

KELLEIGH~~

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wavelength wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 7:52 PM

After getting clarification on my printed pattern, I have begun!!  I am knitting Elann Sierra Aran (80% Highland Wool / 20% Alpaca) in Jasper - a dark teal.

Half-way up the back - here is a picture.  I do have an idea to rework the pattern to allow me to knit the sleeves from the cuff up.  I'll just have to think backwards and write it down - LOL, Right!  Sure!  I'll let you know when I get to that point.

The distance between the outside cables is 12". 

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.

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wavelength wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 7:56 PM

Kelleigh~

I ended up doing a chart of the charts so that I could see the entire structure graphically.  I just left out the stitches (on the chart only!!!!) before and after the first and last set of cables.  Graph paper works well for this.  I never thought I'd do a pattern that included charts, but now that I have, they are no longer as daunting.

Sue

Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.

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IamNadine wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 8:19 PM

more accurate color than pic above

Nadine

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Peggan wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 9:36 PM

  Loving seeing all the photos!   I do think there is a big issue about how close colors are in person to what they appear online.  Some colors seem to photograph darker and others lighter and some tones seem not to show up.   I guess it might be a good idea to order a sample color card or something from a yarn company you like to use--is that possible?     My green yarn, which I thought would be about as light as Nadine's green shows up here in the second photo, is quite a bit darker in real life and has more yellow in it.   I still like it fortunately but I do wish I could be more sure of how online colors would compare. 

  Anyway I started my sweater using the instruction for the Viking variation, which has some cable work in the ribbing. I had a difficult time working with the charts and the cabling got screwed up so I undid it all (only a few inches) and am just going with the regular k2-p2 ribbing.  I am only making it about three inches wide as I think I like that width better. have about half and inch to go.

I have not used charts before and have used written out instructions in the past for simple and more complex cables and patterns. I would like to be able to use the charts and may have to redo them on graph paper as someone suggested here.   In written out instructions, I often take the pattern instructions and greatly enlarge the size of font on my computer and separate the lines of knitting with spaces -- and have all this on one sheet of paper that I print out.  i find it much easier to follow the patterns this way.   Maybe enlarging the charts would help too.

I still plan to use the viking cables after the  ribbing--but I will put in a safety thread for unraveling in case I screw up again.  This safety thread in something I learned trying to do a lace shawl and it was a real knitting saver for me. I used a coarse thread and ran it along the needle under all the stitches at what seemed a safe point.  I am not explaining this well but it was very helpful.

Back to my knitting needles!

Peggy, Southern California

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IamNadine wrote
on Sep 3, 2009 11:03 PM

In response to finding ways to more easily follow patterns, have you seen the magnetic board that are thin enough to fit in a sheet protector. You place the pattern in a sheet protector with the magnetic board behind, then move flat rectangular magnets along as you progress through the pattern. It is wonderful for keeping track of where you are & not accidently jumping ahead. My friend gave me one; she bought it in a yarn shop in McKinley, CA. Sorry I don't have contact info, but if you are interested I'll see if I can find some info.

I have been knitting since I was a teenager & would have problems with losing my place in a complicated pattern (like the felted clog slippers or lace patterns). This has been a real Godsend. If your pattern is in a book, you can slip the board behind the page on which you are working.

Nadine, Northern California

 

Nadine

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Agnes@8 wrote
on Sep 4, 2009 2:31 AM

Nadine,

The magnetic board is a great idea!  I have trouble reading lace chart too.  I'll try to get one next time.

Thanks,

Agnes from Hong Kong

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happynifer wrote
on Sep 4, 2009 3:40 AM

i just use a post it note and place the edge under what line i am at in the chart. 

very inexpensive solution to knowing where you are in a pattern :)

jenna

 

IamNadine:

In response to finding ways to more easily follow patterns, have you seen the magnetic board that are thin enough to fit in a sheet protector. You place the pattern in a sheet protector with the magnetic board behind, then move flat rectangular magnets along as you progress through the pattern. It is wonderful for keeping track of where you are & not accidently jumping ahead. My friend gave me one; she bought it in a yarn shop in McKinley, CA. Sorry I don't have contact info, but if you are interested I'll see if I can find some info.

I have been knitting since I was a teenager & would have problems with losing my place in a complicated pattern (like the felted clog slippers or lace patterns). This has been a real Godsend. If your pattern is in a book, you can slip the board behind the page on which you are working.

Nadine, Northern California

 

 

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SarahB@108 wrote
on Sep 4, 2009 5:36 AM

To keep track, I write the number of each pattern row down the side of a sheet of paper, then use a paperclip over the edge to keep track. I tried using a post-it, but I had problems with it falling off the page.

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lorrainegd wrote
on Sep 4, 2009 5:42 AM

As for the airport issue...what about using something like Knit Picks options needles. If you were forced to hand over your needles, you could unscrew your needlles and surrender them while leaving your project on the cable. And they are not to expensive to replace. Just a thought!

I have had to set aside my CPH for the time being. I am glad that I worked  a bit ahead since I have to put it down for about 2 weeks. At least I won't feel "behind" when I pick it back up again. But I will still be here checking in!

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lorrainegd wrote
on Sep 4, 2009 9:27 AM

Carolyn - I know, there's definately a learning curve. I just learned too within the past month. But before long you will be off and running!

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