THE OFFICIAL CENTRAL PARK HOODIE KAL POST!

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Ladymark wrote
on Oct 16, 2009 3:07 PM

Peggy-

I agree: it's been a good opportunity to make yourself try new stuff in knitting. Mine was the needle-less cabling, and today I see a variation posted on the Knitting Daily page. I usually have no problems teaching myself something from books, tutorials, instructions, etc., but I know I have to see steeking done in person before I'll feel comfortable. I may pay for a private lesson at my LYS,  because I'm about to cast on a gift sweater for my brother that's a straight tube if knit in the round, and armhole steeks would really let the knitting fly.

I'm nearly done with one side of the ribbing, then buttons, then the other side & buttonholes. Sleeves, side seams, done. Can't wait! Keep posting, everyone- the finished producvts are terrific.

 

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Eileen wrote
on Oct 16, 2009 5:26 PM

One trick I use when things are not fitting as I like is to either use smaller needles to make the garment smaller in size or pick a different yarn that is either thinner or thicker in denier (circumference). :)

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Eileen wrote
on Oct 16, 2009 5:29 PM

The Central Park Hoodie is cute but I can't imagine not making it with buttons. I wonder if instructions are included for the buttonholes. Donegal Tweed yarns would be wonderful with this pattern. I am use a celery Donegal Tweed on a vest pattern with zip front right now and it is turning out great.

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Eileen wrote
on Oct 16, 2009 5:32 PM

Is there a KAL for October or November?

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Kelleigh wrote
on Oct 16, 2009 8:27 PM

Eileen:

I wonder if instructions are included for the buttonholes. Donegal Tweed yarns would be wonderful with this pattern.

Eileen,

The pattern does include instructions for buttons and the yarn called for in the pattern in Tahki Donegal Tweed.  I think celery would look great.  Give it a whirl.

Knit on,

~Kelleigh~

KELLEIGH~~

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Posts 122
Kelleigh wrote
on Oct 16, 2009 8:31 PM

Eileen:

Is there a KAL for October or November?

Sorry, I forgot to answer this in my last post....so far there is not a KAL for October/November that I have seen but there is talk about an easy fair isle project for the next KAL when it comes up.

~Kelleigh~

KELLEIGH~~

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cdn wrote
on Oct 17, 2009 2:11 AM

wow! everyone is coming along great! Love the zipper. Read through the tutorials and now that I know about the cure for that awful zipper bulge, I just may try another sweater with a zip. In the meantime, I've done a bit of tinkering with the hood, since my daughter agrees with me that the elfin point is just not that cool. I started the decreasing a couple of inches early and split the middle and did some short row shaping. I may not have completely perfected the picking up of the wrapped stitches because I'm not completely enamoured with the look of the edge it created but it is still better than the point in my opinion. I noticed when I did the three needle bind off on the shoulders, that it still creates a bit of a welt so, like Peggy, I finished the top seam by grafting (aka Kitchner stitch),  I like the look of that much better. Now I just need to study that mattress stitch a bit more and tackle those pesky side seems.

knit well all- no chance for me today. Have to make a bunch if curry for a big party tonight. Happy Diwali everyone!

Catherine

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Peggan wrote
on Oct 17, 2009 5:13 PM

Catherine I like your more rounded hood. I guess i don't mind the more pointy look since I don't imagine I will wear it with the hood up that much.  Also Catherine, I noted you put your photo up there by your name and decided to try to figure this out again and Voila--there i am last summer at my cousin's birthday lunch.

Anyway I am so excited. I am finished except for buttons which I am still thinking about. Maybe one of those jewelry type pin closings would look good.  I will try to get the photos on after I post this. I was pleased with both the seamings -- the kitchner and the mattress that I tried. I was pleased to learn something new.  I wish I had done the kitchner somehow on the shoulders--oh well.  I did not like how the very top of the sleeve caps looked but they improved with steaming.

Because I was concerned about the back neckline stretching out so much I crocheted a single row across the back neck attaching it every other crochet stitch.  It doesn't show on the outside and I think will hold the neck line. So now to get my photos downloaded and posted!

Knit on and I will check back for more photos.

Oh and thanks for the botton link.

Peggy, S Calif

 

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IamNadine wrote
on Oct 17, 2009 5:38 PM

Peggan:
Having decided with this project that I wanted to learn some new things even though I am a long-time knitter, I looked up seaming (under finishing) on KnittingHelp.com to look for actual "official" ways to do seams.  Having sewed for a long time I always just kind of whipped the seams together before. However, I found the mattress stitch for the side seams and even most of the seams putting in the sleeves and WOW what a difference and such nice flat even seams!  And yes nearly invisible on the right side.

 

Peggy! Thanks so much for the info on KnittingHelp.com for seaming. I, too, am a long time knitter, but have not know about the proper way to do mattress stitch. I love the result.

I am hoping to use the applied I-Cord & put in a zipper so, AporaneeS, I am also grateful for the instructions on putting in zippers.  

Nadine

Nadine

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VioletD wrote
on Oct 17, 2009 7:12 PM

I finished my CPH tonight!!!  I love it.  Can't wait to wear it tomorrow and Monday to work.  The weather her in Connecticut has really warranted wearing it...had snow on Thurs. night.   I will also take a pic tomorrow to share but I just had to post now after I sewed on the last button.  Hope everyone is enjoying wearing their finished sweaters!!

Violet

 

 

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ArtfulSoul wrote
on Oct 17, 2009 11:43 PM

I have always liked my results simply backstitching side-seams with sewing thread.  The tension always worked out fine, sometimes though the knit stitches would poke in-and-out as I could never catch a straight line through both thicknesses, so it never looked seamless.

I took courage from Peggy's (Peggan) adventure into mattress stitch. On my most recent project tonight (not CPH), I did it!  But, boy, working on a smaller gauge with some different stitch patterns (not stockinette), it was far more challenging and much less than perfect to figure out the "bar" to pick up.  Practice may help, maybe planning to finish in this method could influence my choice of stitches toward the sides?  Anyone have a technique suggestion, do you always have 2 stockinette stitches on the sides no matter what the rest of the body is?

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mamadeitz wrote
on Oct 18, 2009 8:02 AM

I am new to blocking what does everyone use. should i buy a blocking board. What is easiest to do.

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ArtfulSoul wrote
on Oct 18, 2009 9:01 AM

mamadeitz:

I am new to blocking what does everyone use. should i buy a blocking board. What is easiest to do.

 

A few members reported earlier in this forum about blocking products, so be sure and read from the beginning!  I ordered on-line, just received and used one recommended blocking board from GuardianTable-Pad, and I used rustproof pins.  There are earlier posting regarding wires that I am unfamiliar with. I liked my board the first moment I used it!  Before that, though, I have thick & flat carpeting, so was able to get on my knees and successfully block by pinning into the carpet (plastic protection under knitting of course).  This was very economical. But with the board I can stand and work on higher surface, move blocking elsewhere when done!

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cdn wrote
on Oct 18, 2009 10:02 AM

call me cheap (or frugal, or inventive, or anything you like) but I'm always on the lookout for ways to save money on projects and I find that most designated use product (like specific craft items, or scientific ware etc.) are sooo expensive and often you can substitute materials from other worlds that do the job as well at a fraction of the cost. Blocking boards being one of them. For many years I have been using a sheet of  1 inch thick polystyrene insulation board that I bought at my local building center for about $8. It is 24 inches wide (might come in wider widths?) and 8 feet long. I just cut it in half so now I have 2 boards 2x4 ft. They are very light. They hold the pins well and seem to be self healing, wipe off easily and I just stand them up and slip them behind bookshelves for storage. (they add an R5 insulation value to my basement walls when not in use).  I can get all the pieces of a sweater on the two at once, slip a couple of cans on one and stack the two together for drying if space is at a premium. They don't look like much but they do the job. And as previously mentioned be sure to use rust free pins (some places you don't want to cheap out...been there- done that!)

The hard part, I think, is forcing yourself to take the time to block at all. By that point, you just kind of want to get on with getting the project put together, but I think (as I have ranted about before) that it does give you a nicer finish to your garment if you take the time to block. I have tried the damp towel layed on the pieces trick but now am much happier with actually soaking the  pieces, rolling them in a towel to blot dry and then pinning them out. Maybe now that I have been spinning and see what a difference it makes to a finished yarn to set the twist by soaking it and drying before use, that I notice the difference in the knit fabric more now. Besides, it's kind of fun to watch the metamorphosis of a piece as it stretches out and goes from a small, crinkly, stretchy thing to the right sized, flat piece of fabric. (no accounting for some people's idea of fun is there?)

Catherine

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cdn wrote
on Oct 18, 2009 10:22 AM

Peggy, glad you posted a photo. It's kind of nice to see the person to whom one is talking. I'm new to these forum things and only just figured out how to do that. Maybe I'll even get inspired to do my bio now too. You mentioned a while back about stiffening up my lace bookmarks. I wasn't going to, but I notice that they start out nice and flat after I block them but they must absorb moisture from the air, or something, and kind of soften up and shrink a bit again. I wonder if they still make starch, or spray starch these days? I don't iron much (maybe I shouldn't admit that) so I don't know about what's out there. I remember my mom putting starch in my dad's shirts. It always seemed wierd to me. But then I also remember that amazing oxymoron of the laundry world- putting "bluing" into your whites to make them whiter!!! what was up with that??? Anyway- if some of you other crafters out there know anything about stiffening stuff (it seems like it was mostly crocheted stuff people did that to) maybe you could point me in the right direction? Thanks.

Catherine

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