Kind of Lost

This post has 5 Replies | 1 Follower
Not Ranked
Posts 2
jclymer88 wrote
on Jun 15, 2010 3:28 PM

I started crocheting when I was 5 years old (no joke, I saw my grandma doing it and bugged her until she taught me).  I only know a few different kinds of stitches that my grandma taught me.  I've lost count of how many afgans I've made and quite honestly I'm getting bored.  I love it, don't get me wrong, but I gotta do something else for awhile.  I thought about trying knitting but I"m a little lost.  What size needles do I use?  What type yarn works best?  How not to screw it up considering I know no stiches?  Where would be a good place to start with knitting and without killing my beloved crochet off completely?  Maybe taking turns between the two.

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,589
Zoe wrote
on Jun 15, 2010 5:20 PM

Hi jclymer,

Many crocheters and knitters start when very young so I am counting you in!  I remember my brother at the age of 5 learning to crochet too.  He made a bookworm bookmarker.  Since he was the youngest and I had already been knitting and crocheting for some years, he wanted to learn too.  I remember what he said, "If a girl can do it, so can I"  Funny, but I don't remember him making anything else with yarn!

A good place to start learning is to find someone in your community who knits and can help you with this.  Their knowledge is very valuable.  See if your local library knows of a knitting club or group.  I can give you the web address of a knitting site that can also help you out.  If you have a local yarn store (LYS) then please ask there about such things.  Learning to knit will not kill off the crocheter in you.  In fact the two can compliment each other.  A lot of knitting projects get finishing touches with the crochet hook!

Welcome to the wonderful world of knitting!  And all knitting is good.  Come back to Knitting Daily often cause that is where knitters hang out!  Zoe

http://www.knittinghelp.com/

  I don't know if you are familiar with the  www.LionBrand.com  site.  It gives lessons on knitting  and crocheting.  You must join up for it.  It costs nothing to join.  Patterns are free to download.  You can order the yarns and needles from Lion Brand or you can download the pattern and take it to the LYS and ask for their help with yarn and needles.  Many LYS have Lion Brand yarn and if they don't carry it, they know which yarns are interchangeable.  Vanna White is a well known supporter and knitter of Lion Brand.  Fill out the form for their free catalogue which is full of yarns and other things.

Check out these things and let me know how you get on.  There are a few of us knitters who have learned to knit as very young children and can point you in the right direction.  I personally knit both continental style and English style.  The continental style of knitting is more fluid, is faster, and uses less hand/arm movement.  I would encourage you to learn this style first.  You already know how to hold your yarn in your left hand to crochet, and knitting continental style is no different for holding your yarn in your left hand.  Ultimately, you should learn both continental style and English style of knitting so you can use them when doing Fair Isle knitting.  But for now don't sweat this detail.  When  you watch the videos from Knitting Help, watch the continental ones only.  I hope you enjoy this journey as once you are on it, you never leave it!  It is so enjoyable and relaxing!.

PS.  The continental knitting is the pink bar on the videos.  Watch the video of the cast on first and then actually sit down with your needle and yarn in front of the video.  Knit along with the video and you can stop/start it when you need to as you go along.  Start with the cast on video and proceed to the knit stitch, then the purl stitch, etc.

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,589
Zoe wrote
on Jun 15, 2010 6:02 PM

Hi jclymer,

I nearly forgot to tell you that the last time I was in Walmart, in the knitting section where they had their needles and hooks, they had a learn to knit DVD and one complete with needles and a book.  You just needed to buy some yarn.  The person who works in that department should be able to help you out.

Good luck, Zoe

Not Ranked
Posts 2
jclymer88 wrote
on Jun 15, 2010 6:46 PM

Thanks.  I did not know Lion Brand did that.  I have used some of their yarns before.  I will be watching it.  Unfortunately I honestly don't have time to find anyone in the community and work with them.  Right now I'm doing an internship and in the fall I'll be back to 18 credit hours again before graduation...then I'll be moving from IN to TX.  =^^=  I will go check out LionBrand.com now though.  I'm pretty good with figuring out stitches if you give me a picture.  I'm really excited to go take a look!

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,589
Zoe wrote
on Jun 15, 2010 9:39 PM

Hi jclymer,

I am glad I could help out a little bit.  The video sites I posted will really help you too.  I would encourage you to check out the yarns you used for your afghans.  If you have any left overs (and all ppl who knit or crochet have some left over yarns), see if they would be suitable for you to knit. Check your size of crochet hook, and match a similar size set of knitting needles.  (I tend to use metric sizing as it is common here and is more accurate for me.)  On the ball of yarn wrapping, there will be a suggested needle size as well as a crochet hook size.  If you buy a pair of needles that are suggested for that yarn weight, you should make out okay for learning to knit.  I am sorry that I forgot to mention that to you.

Our lives are always so busy with things and often we forget to take time to smell the roses and relax.  The knitting is my time to smell the roses.  It helps me to destress and refocus on what is important to me.  It gives me my Zoe-time.  It sounds like through your studies that your jclymer-time is really crowded too and you need an outlet for the stresses.  I hope that knitting can provide that for you.

When you find your method of casting on and knitting, can I make a suggestion?  Do make yourself some swatches and use them as coffee coasters.  A swatch is simply a 4 inch square piece of knitting. These are labled as gauge on the yarn labels.  It will tell you how many stitches to cast on and how many rows to knit in order for this yarn to meet its gauge. ( Don't fret over this if your gauge doesn't match up to what the label says.  A lot of knitters never get this gauge because they all have their own tensions as they knit.)   I have made many to practise various stitches.  I have made some placemats as practice pieces for different stitch patterns and colors.  (The grandkids love these and like to chose which ones they want under their plates!)

Good luck, and let me know how you make out!  Zoe

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,589
Zoe wrote
on Jun 15, 2010 10:13 PM

Hi jclymer,

The lion brand teaches the knitting by using the English method.  This may be uncomfortable for you since you already are a crocheter.  Check out the knitting help site for the continental method.  The yarn is held the same as you do when you crochet and the needle manipulation is similar to the crochet hook manipulation.  You may find this method more comfortable.  Once you learn the continental method of holding the yarn and needles, the English method will be easy for you to follow and transfer over to the continental.

Zoe

Page 1 of 1 (6 items) | RSS