Tufting & Fraying for Added Warmth?

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Segune wrote
on Oct 4, 2010 3:52 AM

I'm always trying to find methods for increasing warmth in knitted hats, mittens, etc. I found a technique mentioned on Wikipedia called "tufting", where short loops of yarn are pulled through the finished item so that the ends are on the inside, after which the ends are frayed. I can't find any other information on this on the internet. Has anyone ever used this technique? How do you fray the yarn: by using some sort of comb or pulling apart the ends? Thanks for any help.

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Zoe wrote
on Oct 4, 2010 9:05 AM

Segune:

I'm always trying to find methods for increasing warmth in knitted hats, mittens, etc. I found a technique mentioned on Wikipedia called "tufting", where short loops of yarn are pulled through the finished item so that the ends are on the inside, after which the ends are frayed. I can't find any other information on this on the internet. Has anyone ever used this technique? How do you fray the yarn: by using some sort of comb or pulling apart the ends? Thanks for any help.

 

Hi Sequne,

From the researching that I have done on the tufting process, (its mostly used in carpeting) you can either tie the ends on the inside, or you leave the ends long enough so that they will felt into the mittens.  When you wash and dry the mittens, the yarn will fray and felt into the knitted stitches on its own.  The yarn used for tufting clothing items is mostly made from wool (not superwashed wool).

A lot of added warmth to mits, socks, sweaters, hats, etc.  is done by doing stranded or fair isle knitting.  That way there is always at least two "layers" of yarn in the item.  When washed, these layers felt together and are nice and warm!

Hope it helps you out, Zoe

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Segune wrote
on Oct 5, 2010 9:33 AM

Zoe,

Thanks for the tips. Have you tried this method yourself? I hadn't imagined that the ends would felt into the item, but that they would act like a fleece. Does the item lose its elasticity through tufting? And the same question for stranded knitting.

Segune

 

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Zoe wrote
on Oct 5, 2010 10:39 AM

Hi Segune,

I haven't done this tufting but did do some internet research.  Since I do the stranded/fair isle knitting, I know how this would behave.  Yes, once things are "felted" together, a lot of the stretch is lost.  So when doing mittens, socks etc. with the stranding/fair isle, you need to go a little bit bigger.  This allows for the "smaller" inside of the sock/mittens because of the extra loops of yarn that are carried around the inside of the item.

Have a happy knit time today!  Zoe Smile

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ZassZ wrote
on Oct 5, 2010 12:33 PM

Hi Segune, 

I read this article on Thrums some time ago and I thought I would mention it to you in case you had not seen it.  I think you would enjoy reading about thrums since ;you enjoyed the Wikipedia article on tufting.  It's under "How Insert Thrums in Your Knitting" under date of Feb. 13, 2009 in the Blogs tab here at top of page.  Quickly get to it by typing title in search box here.  It makes your mittens really nice & warm as well. 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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Zoe wrote
on Oct 5, 2010 4:28 PM

ZassZ:
Thrums

 

Hi ZassZ,

I am so glad you jumped in here because I have been trying for days now to remember the word "thrums".  (My poor brain goes on vacation sometimes! heha).  Thrums are so like the tufting.

How have you been?  We been busy with doc visits and stuff.  I feel completely worn out.  Everything aches!  But the fall weather is beautiful.  I moved my rocking chair in front of the big picture window in the living room.  The window faces south and so I am getting a lot of the nice warmth from the sun on my arthritis!  I love reading all about the stuff happening on the forums although I am not always up to answering them.  I must be getting near 50 now (it is such an old number for me!).

Got the grandkids and kids (from hubby's side) coming down on Sat. for Thanksgiving.  Up here in Canada, this coming weekend is our Thanksgiving.  Got the turkey and bought the pumpkin pies today!  What do you do for Thanksgiving?  I know in the US it is not celebrated until the end of November sometime.

Take care, Zoe Smile

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Zoe wrote
on Oct 5, 2010 4:33 PM

Hi Segune,

Do check out the site that ZassZ recommended.  Here is another site as to how to do the thrums.  It even has nice pictures!

http://www.jobodesigns.com/_sites/JoboDesigns/page/Thrums-How-to-make-Thrum-Mittens.aspx

Happy tufting and thrumming along, Zoe Smile

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ZassZ wrote
on Oct 5, 2010 8:01 PM

Hi Zoe!!!

I had to "chuckles" because I had it on the tip of my tongue but could not remember it for anything either.  I kept thinking "bobs" but I knew it wasn't it.  So I went to blogs and looked for it by the time frame that I remembered it to be around and found it that way.  But yes, thrums are so nice and warm. 

I am getting there, and thank you for asking.  I was wondering how you did as well on your last excursion.  I hope the specialist, tests and so forth were helpful to coming to a resolution for a better way.  No wonder you feel worn, will you please rest a little?  I love the rocking chair in the window idea.  Good for getting Vitamin D.  As much exposure to sun around here, I was surprised to hear my dr. tell me to take 1,000 mg. Vit D per day.  Then the next visit, I was told to increase to 2,000 mg a day.  I couldn't believe it.  Trying to build bone density.  The forums are entertaining and informative too aren't they?  You are still a "youngster", I must say. 

My favorite part of a turkey is the stuffing!  I make it whenever I get a taste for it.  It smells so good when it's cooking.  My favorite aunt helped me make my first turkey ever.  She was a fantastic cook.  So we never wait til once a year here to have it, although I realize some households do.   

I was so glad to hear from you and was thinking you were catching up from you trip.  By the way I did come across some pretty yarn with a color like maples leaves or similar to that and I thought about you.  If I can find it again, I will post it for you, ok? 

It's been cool, rainy, cloudy, thunder, lightening in sporadic places all over.  A 60 degree in temps from the Monday of last week to the Monday of this past one.  So such drastic change in climate is hard at first.  The first night my foot was twinging me very badly, as I was thinking about to give up and take a pill, next thing I woke & it was morning.  Next morning was much better.  I think it's the very first changes in temperature that make the body feel bad.  At least, it's more noticeable to me.   I love fall weather and I love the rain.     

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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ZassZ wrote
on Oct 5, 2010 8:12 PM

Zoe,

Try this at:  http://www.jimmybeanswool.com/knitting/yarn/Berroco/Campus/.asp?showLarge=true&specPCVID=21131

And if we can't remember "thrums" we can just think of "bobs" and get the link above  Wink

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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Segune wrote
on Oct 7, 2010 12:00 AM

Zoe & ZassZ,

Thank you both for providing the great keyword thrum / thrumming, along with all the links. I am thinking of trying this in the next hat I make -- at least for the ear-portion. Because I knit the continental way and left-handed at that, it's hard for me to follow the directions, so we'll see what happens.

Segune

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ZassZ wrote
on Oct 7, 2010 2:14 PM

Oh Hi Segune,

Your welcome Big Smile  I hope you have good success with your hat and that is a good idea for the ear portions.  Especially want to keep the cold out of your ears in winter.  No ear aches for me.  Now if you want to tell us more about your hats, please join us at HATS CRAZY under Knitting Chat any time you have a moment.  If you do socks, then SOCKS under Knitting Chat too.  We all have alot of fun over there.  Lightning or shine and all hours of the day or Sleep

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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ssiwoolco wrote
on Nov 20, 2012 8:18 PM

Try patterns for 'thrumming' or 'thrummed' knitting.  Thrumming is another name for tufting.  There are a lot of free patterns on 'Ravelry' or other sites.  Good luck.  Susan

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ZassZ wrote
on Nov 21, 2012 8:05 PM

Zoe:

ZassZ:
Thrums

Hi ZassZ,

I moved my rocking chair in front of the big picture window in the living room.  The window faces south and so I am getting a lot of the nice warmth from the sun on my arthritis!  I love reading all about the stuff happening on the forums although I am not always up to answering them. Zoe Smile

Hi Zoe,

Though it's been a while since we have heard how you are, I still picture you as you described above.  I hope you may read this and know you are still in my thoughts and concerns for your well being.  Take care. 

 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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