Fair Isle: in the Round Joining Help!

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Merlich wrote
on Apr 13, 2011 4:11 PM

Hi Dearose,

I'm glad you've seen the video.

Now, please, before you keep on with your knitting take your work, go to the nearest mirror you have and wear it on or the one you are knitting it for. Your skulls should look flat. Do they? I am worried about that.

Patience, persistence and love are the main ingredients for wonderful knittings.

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Merlich wrote
on Apr 13, 2011 4:19 PM

Hi Zoe and Zassz,

Zoe, I'm glad I could help you.

ZassZ, O.K. I got it.

Bye.

 

 

Patience, persistence and love are the main ingredients for wonderful knittings.

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dearose wrote
on Apr 14, 2011 2:43 PM

Merlich-

They aren't flat. I think i may have pulled my long floats too tight. But that's quite alright. I feel quite accomplished for my very first Fair Isle attempt! I'm going to be downloading the Intro to Intarsia video from the big sale going on, and hopefully that will give me some pointers. I also read that working your project (when in the round) with the RS facing inward and the WS facing out towards you, will help to give those floats a little extra stretch. I'm going to make another one of these hats, and this time I'll have a whole arsenal of tips at the ready!

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Zoe wrote
on Apr 14, 2011 4:05 PM

dearose:
I think i may have pulled my long floats too tight.

 

Hi dearose,

There is a way to sort of guard against getting those floats pulled to tight.  Once you have knitted color A and color B is the float, evenly space out your color A stitches on your right hand needle before you start to knit with color B.  In this manner, your float will be as long as the length of your stitches that it has to float across.  Trust me on this one and you will see.  Of course when you space out your stitches, you have to guard against spacing them too far apart or too close together.  You will get the hang of it!!  And congratulations on getting your first fair isle project on the go and done!!  Keep this one for your ownself as a sampler of what you did and learned doing it.  Of course you should keep all your notes you made on it.

The Intarsia video -- I am not sure it would help you out here or not.  Intarsia and fair isle knitting are two separate things.  I know that for myself, when I do fair isle knitting, I use both hands to hold the yarns in.  I am a continental knitter and I hold the main color in my left hand.  For the secondary colors, I hold the yarns in my right hand and knit them English style.  I have found that the yarns automatically cross and twist themselves on the back of the work.  These are just little things that you will pick up and learn as you go along.

There really is no truth to having the inside of the work being the RS and the outside of the work being the WS in order to get the floats a little more stretch.  It does work better to have the outside of the work being the right side.  As with everything, with practice you will get the right amount of tension you need for your fair isle knitting.  Try the spacing out on the right needle before switching yarn colors and that should work out great for you.

Happy knitting, Zoe Smile

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ZassZ wrote
on Apr 14, 2011 4:36 PM

ZassZ:

  

Hi Zoe, I agree with your comments and I also work from the outside=right side of work.  Dearose, As you pick up this method your tension will even out and your floats will be neither too tight or too loose.  Patience and practice before you know it you will be breezing along.  I tend to be a perfectionist as well, but don't be too down on yourself.  I put this pic here of a cowl down in grey, pink & wine.  It helped alot to use the method Zoe described above.  She is good at describing that method and saved me from typing it all up here.   Smile

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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Merlich wrote
on Apr 14, 2011 7:32 PM

Hi Dearose,

Besides all the tips Zoe and ZassZ gave you there is already missing you have to take into consideration that when you are knitting a garment that is ment to be flat your tension is not as loose as it is in a garment knitted in the round because, in this case, your hat, is going to be stretched and all the stitches will be tightened. In your next Fair Isle hat you will have to knit loosen stitches despite they look too loose, it's O.K.

I also have a ring made by Clover that helps me with the tangle thing.

Go on, I am happy too about your goal.

If you can, let us see a picture when you are done.

Bye, bye.

Patience, persistence and love are the main ingredients for wonderful knittings.

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dearose wrote
on Apr 15, 2011 5:34 PM

Here's my Teddy wearing the hat. It's a small hat for a little boy, so I couldn't try it on for you guys.

Zoe, ZassZ, and Merlich: thanks a whole bunch. I figured Intarsia was different from fair isle, but it did give me some really good tips for managing floats and tacking them down, and also gave me a new approach to working with color in knitting :] so it's all good! Also gave me some nice tips on weaving in ends (which i had a TON of when i finished this hat). I guess I'll have to give Fair Isle in the flat a try as well, that way I'll have more practice.

-Dea

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ZassZ wrote
on Apr 15, 2011 5:42 PM

Hi Dea,

You did some very good knitting on this hat.  I especially love the color combinations in each segment.  You really did very well and congratulations.  What are you going to knit next?

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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Zoe wrote
on Apr 15, 2011 7:16 PM

dearose:
I guess I'll have to give Fair Isle in the flat a try as well, that way I'll have more practice.

 

Hi Dea,

Knitting a flat piece back and forth in a fair isle pattern is quite difficult.  Here is why:  when you are knitting fair isle in the round you are making only one knit stitch repeatedly, as you did for this hat.  When you knit back and forth, on the right side, you will be knitting the stitches and the floats will be at the back.  Then you turn your work and have to keep up the pattern and purl all these on the way back and the floats are in the front of your work.  This really throws off your tension.  There is quite a difference in how you will maintain your tensions, floats, and twisting the floats.  I would suggest you make lots more fair isle projects in the round before tackling the flat pieces.  This way you get your tension and floats down perfectly before you try out purling fair isle on the wrong side.

When you get to the point where you will do a flat fair isle knitting piece, I would suggest you will want to make a Norwegian snowflake on a square of 6 inches.  It can be a large coffee cup coaster or a place mat under a flower pot.  The small piece will allow you to manipulate the knitting item with ease.  The pattern is simple and only two colors are needed.  Also, you wont feel badly if you need to frog it and start over.

Your skull hat looks great on Mr Teddy and he doesnt seem to mind wearing it!  lol

Happy knitting, Zoë Smile

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ZassZ wrote
on Apr 16, 2011 9:29 PM

Hi Dea, 

Today I was browsing again through my magazine issue.  In the Vogue Knitting International, Fall 2010 issue, I cam across a hat done in fair isle in the round.  What caught my attention was that in the description it said that "this is a terrific first Fair Isle project for an otherwise experienced knitter."  So I thought about you.  To try another fair isle in the round if you care to take a look at it. 

It is the London Calling hat on page 77 by Sheila Joynes.  It is described as "English roses and ivy meander around the crown of Sheila Joynes's chic topper, in Knit One Crochet Too's USDK.  Stitched in the round from the corrugated rib up, this is a terrific first Fair Isle project for an otherwise experienced knitter."  It really is a very pretty design.   

I am going to post this info also over in Hats Crazy. 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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Merlich wrote
on Apr 16, 2011 10:01 PM

Hi Dearose,

Your hat is fabulous. Congratulations!

Don't try intarsia untill you can handle fair isle at all. You have to be more than patient with multiple colors and the carrying yarns back when you are knitting the right side and carrying in the front when you are in the wrong side, weaving in ends thing that makes me get mad. But, as we can see maybe you could make it as this hat is your first multicolor and the result is fantastic.

If you try flat intarsia or fair isle don't forget to carry both yarns at the same time, so they don't become tight.

Very good, Dea!!!

Patience, persistence and love are the main ingredients for wonderful knittings.

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,770
ZassZ wrote
on Apr 20, 2011 9:50 AM

Hi dearose, 

I wasn't looking for this but came across it by accident.  As I remembered your mentioning something about working from the WS.  http://www.knittingdaily.com/blogs/daily/archive/2010/04/16/knitting-tips-and-tricks-from-you.aspx

It's the tip from Martha Puccio, on Fair Isle tension.  Hers is about the 5th one down on Kathleen's page.  See what you think of it.   

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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