Simply Sockupied Knit-along: Ann's Go-To Socks

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cekoons wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 8:38 AM

Well personally I've never been one to change the size of my DPN's when knitting socks, therefore I wouldn't bother when using Magic Loop, I prefer to knit the sock top in ribbing or pattern (I like baby cables) all the way down to the ankle, this seems to keep things snug fitting and comfy rather than only an inch of ribbing at the top. Hope this helps!!! The magic loop deal eliminates twisting of stitches and dropping or losing things going from needle to needle on DPN's.

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cekoons wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 8:46 AM

OK npaprocki, been THERE, done THAT...here's the scoop:   however many stitches you cast on at the top (must be an amount divisible by 4) when you get to the ankle you DIVIDE THAT NUMBER IN HALF and knit the heel flap (let's say 60 stitches cast on, then 30 stitches separated for the heel flap) you knit the heel flap either on single pointed needles, or if it works you can continue on DPN's or even magic loops, you knit these 30 stitches for the heel flap to about 2.5 inches for an average adult sock. You can knit it in either plain stockinette (knit up, purl back) or bird's eye (slip first stitch of every row, on the knit row k1, sl1; on the purl row, sl1, purl to end).  THEN when it comes time to TURN THE HEEL, you start on a purl row, slip1, then purls across HALF THE STITCHES (in this case 15) purl one more stitch and TURN work, yes the row is NOT FINISHED, you sl1 and k1 sl1 back to the space created...I'm missing something here, but read your instructions and you p2tog making a hole, but the deal is this...follow your instructions, maybe speaking them outloud or have somebody read them, IT WILL WORK...trust me!!! It's great fun learning to knit sox and then wearing them after. Good luck! Also, YOUTUBE is a terrific resource for learning to knit, they will tell you over and over again without getting annoyed!

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Shaggylinus wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 11:45 AM

Could you please answer a question for me?  I just tried starting some socks using the magic loop method and my circle is just huge.  It looks like I am making a hat rather than socks.  Can you tell me what I am doing wrong?  I am using worsted weight yarn to practice with size 5 32" circle needle. (the yarn and needle size was suggested on a you tube video i watched to get the idea before i try it on the sock for this KAL)

 

Thanks,

 

Renée

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Anne Merrow wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 3:59 PM

loanrho:
I would really like to learn and use the Magic Loop method, but may just stick with dpn's since that's how the pattern is written.

If you are interested in learning, you might want to check out this post from Knitting Daily's Kathleen Cubley: The Magical Magic Loop. It can be tough to envision, but it's easy once you get the hang of it.

 

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Anne Merrow wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 4:11 PM

npaprocki:

What does "Set-up Row 1" and "2" mean? 

I've cast on 56 stitches.  Now the directions for the heel say it is worked on 28 stitches over back of leg.

To work Set up Row 1 I'm working 14 stitches 3 times (that's 42 stitches... already exceeding the 28 st).  Do I work the pattern 3 times and then do the k2 when I'm finished.  That's how I'm reading the pattern.  Or (this makes more sense to me) I knit the pattern for 14 st and then k2, and repeat that 3 times?  Which comes to 48 st. total.

I can see why that would be confusing! The note before "Set-up Row 1" explains what the directions that follow it will accomplish. Basically you've been beginning the round at the side of the sock; Set-up Row 1 moves the beginning of the round to the back of the sock.

Set-up Row 1 says, "Work 14 sts in established rib patt as follows," which means that for the next 14 stitches you'll work the stitches as they appear, knitting the knits and purling the purls. After the colon, it spells out exactly how to do that: by working [k3, p1] 3 times (which makes 12 stitches), then knitting 2 more stitches (total of 14 stitches). The part you work 3 times is just the [k3, p1] part, then you k2, then you turn.

On Set-up Row 2, you turn, slip 1, and purl 27. Some people find it confusing that you've worked 14 stitches in one direction but when you turn you go 28 stitches in the other direction; basically you're moving the center of the round to the back of the heel by borrowing stitches from the previous round. 

I hope that makes it clearer. The notes are supposed to tell you where you're headed, then the row directions tell you how to get there.

 

 

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Anne Merrow wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 4:15 PM

Shaggylinus:
When you use that method are you still supposed to use 2 sizes of needs. For example,  on the dpn I use size 2 for the ribbing then switch off to size 1 dpn.  If you do switch, how do you go about transferring the stitches over? 

You would only use one circular needle at a time. For instance, you'd use the larger needle for the top of the sock; both "ends" of the circular needle are the same size, and you always knit off the left needle onto the right.

To change needle sizes at the ankle, you'd follow the same method as for changing needle sizes on dpns: When it comes time to change, drop the needle in your right hand and pick up the smaller circular needle. Use one tip of the new circular needle in your right hand and knit from the left (larger) needle onto the right (smaller) needle. Eventually all the stitches will have been worked off the larger needle; then you can drop it and just use the smaller needle with one end in each hand.

Does that make sense?

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Anne Merrow wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 4:18 PM

cekoons:
Well personally I've never been one to change the size of my DPN's when knitting socks, therefore I wouldn't bother when using Magic Loop, I prefer to knit the sock top in ribbing or pattern (I like baby cables) all the way down to the ankle, this seems to keep things snug fitting and comfy rather than only an inch of ribbing at the top.

I wasn't used to this technique either; it's something Ann Budd learned from Priscilla Gibson-Roberts. The ribbing would make the socks hug youir legs more, but Ann points out that making the sock a little wider on the wider part of your leg keeps your calf from pushing your socks down to your ankles.

It's certainly not required! As long as you're getting fabric that you're comfortable with, use whatever needles you like.

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Anne Merrow wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 4:25 PM

Renée--Good for you for trying something new! Basically Magic Loop works by pinching out a length of cable on each side of your knitting. (I think it looks like ears.) But if you have enough stitches to go all the way around the circular needle, then you might not have any extra cable to pinch out.

Magic Loop seems like such a good idea that I wonder why it wasn't invented years ago! On the other hand, until manufacturers developed really flexible cords, it wouldn't have worked. 

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cekoons wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 5:48 PM

When you are doing Magic Loop on a circular needle, you have your stitches split in half on one side of the needle with the other half on the wirey part between points....hard to describe, you do NOT have the stitches spread ALL the way around the circular needle like when knitting a sweater or afghan or something with lots and lots of stitches. If you're doing, say....60 stitches in fingering yarn on a small needle, then 30 stitches will be on the front side of the needle with the other 30 on the wirey part held behind, then you pull the correct needle out to knit which ever half of the stitches it's time to knit....you alternately pull the needles out, right then left then right then left. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVXLOG1L8LM

Try this youtube and see if it's any clearer????

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Shaggylinus wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 8:20 PM

Thanks everyone for your help and suggestions!  I have ordered the correct circular needle in the longer size so when I get that in the mail I will hopefully catch up with all of you.   Magic Loop, here I come! :)

 

Renée

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djahorne wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 11:48 PM

Hi Everyone!

I have given up on knitting on DPN! I have tried about 8 times today on getting started on my socks usng DPN. It just does not work for me. I fight with all the needles. Also I have never worked with such small needles and such small yarn. So, I have decided NOT to give up knitting socks, but try a different way. In the morning I am going back to the only and very small knit shop in town and see if they have any size 1 circular needles. My only problem is that I don't know how to rewrite the pattern for the magic loop method. Can anyone that is really knowledgeable in knit patterns be able to help, or recommend any books or websites that teach sock knitting for beginners using the magic loop method?

Thanks for all your help.

Janice from Ridgecrest,Ca.

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djahorne wrote
on Mar 2, 2012 11:52 PM

cekoons:

When you are doing Magic Loop on a circular needle, you have your stitches split in half on one side of the needle with the other half on the wirey part between points....hard to describe, you do NOT have the stitches spread ALL the way around the circular needle like when knitting a sweater or afghan or something with lots and lots of stitches. If you're doing, say....60 stitches in fingering yarn on a small needle, then 30 stitches will be on the front side of the needle with the other 30 on the wirey part held behind, then you pull the correct needle out to knit which ever half of the stitches it's time to knit....you alternately pull the needles out, right then left then right then left. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVXLOG1L8LM

Try this youtube and see if it's any clearer????

 

Cekoons, thank you very much for your help here. I understand what you are saying and I can do that until we get to the heal flap and the heal, then I am lost on how you would work this pattern using the magic loop method. The foot seams easy and the same way you would work the leg, then I am stuck again on the toe. Would you be able to help on these two areas of the pattern using the magic loop method?

Thanks

Janice from Ridgecrest, Ca.

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npaprocki wrote
on Mar 3, 2012 7:36 AM

Thanks for helping me out with the heel instructions!  I didn't get as far as I wanted last night, but I printed them out and I think I understand

Nancy

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cekoons wrote
on Mar 3, 2012 9:02 AM

I can only imagine what a steep learning curve it would be to learn DPN's as an adult...I learned as a child and had any number of disasters and outright failures before learning to "get it right"...I think it's far easier to learn Magic Loop, it seems almost intuitive...and the youtube videos should clinch it. My only problem w/ Magic Loop is the Shipwreck Shawl I'm trying to make, it starts with 9 stitches, worked in rounds to over 600 stitches, keeping track of those ROUNDS!!!! Hahahaahah...it's all an adventure...relax and enjoy the ride!

 

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cekoons wrote
on Mar 3, 2012 9:11 AM

You are most welcome, it's really *** the first time you read them and they want you to turn back and forth without completing the row, it really blows your mind the first couple of times, until you just DO IT and see what happens, it's really kewl!!!! Also, the slipped stitches at the beginning of the rows are to make it easier to see and pick up (or knit up) your gusset stitches when you're ready to finish the sock after making the heel flap.

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