To Kit or not to Kit

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Jaden Shadow wrote
on Jul 13, 2012 2:51 PM

I've been knitting for almost 10 years now, mostly using the same set of mismatch needles I got handed down from my grandma. Now that I'm in a position to buy my own I'm finding all these kits and I have to wonder if I should kit or just buy each size pair by pair? Should I get metal like I've been using FOREVER or should i try the wooden ones? (I know I can't use the plasic they just feel weird).

Should I Kit? If so, whitch one should i get? Help please?

Knitting is Theropy

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dbaines wrote
on Jul 14, 2012 3:03 PM

Have you ever tried wooden needles?  Maybe get one pair for your next project and see if you even like them.  I, personally, have a set of Aero metal straights and circulars that were bought a pair at a time when i was younger and they are still great (although maybe a little warped).  I have recently bought some Brittany Birch straights in the sizes I use most often and I love them.  Because I've already sunk so much money into needles, I can't really justify buying a kit as well.  But if I were to start at the beginning again, I probably  would by the kit.  Decide if you want metal or wood and then check some reviews.  For what it's worth I would likely have gotten a Harmony wood kit because it has the sizes I use most often, they're really pretty, and the price is good.  There are lots of other kits out there (metal, wood, or plastic) in a wide range of prices.  I will say that before buying an entire kit, I would get one pair of straights from the company to make sure I liked them.

Good Luck!!

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salmonmac wrote
on Jul 15, 2012 7:47 AM

I agree with dbaines' advice. Try different kinds to see which you like before investing in a set. You may also find that you  like metal needles for some yarn and prefer a 'grabbier' needle like bamboo for other kinds. Some companies offer starter sets with metal, acrylic and wood so you can test drive all three at a reasonable price.

http://www.knitpicks.com/needles/TRY_IT_Needle_Set__D90589.html?intmedid=NeedleHome-SubAd-TINS

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ZassZ wrote
on Jul 17, 2012 12:08 AM

When I started collecting I began with some metal needles, crochet hooks, etc.  When a few plastic ones were given to me, I tried them out.  Eventually I tried the bamboo and other woods.  I love them all for way they are suited to different types of yarns.   Personally, I am speaking for just myself, but I would have to say that I wouldn't want a kit with just "one" type of material for the needles.  Reason being that I use lots of different types of yarn (wool, cotton, bamboo, silk, mohair, to name a few) and take to metal needles some to wooden, some to plastic, etc.  I choose my needles to use for a project by the yarn I am knitting with.  If the yarn slides too easily, I will switch to a bamboo or other wood, or some type that will grab and I am not loosing stitches.  The idea is to be relaxed with the knitting process, not all tensed up.  Which is what happens when your fighting with your stitches, or loosing them off your needles.  Hope you find the best choices for type of knitting you do most often.   

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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ZassZ wrote
on Jul 23, 2012 4:41 PM

hi dbaines, 

Over the past week I picked up another pair of wooden needles in a different brand from the usual.  I found it very interesting that they behave differently than the other wood needles I have usually purchased.  I actually like them alot and see from trying them that they have their attributes for using them with the type of yarn and project I am doing.  I still love the other brand of woods as well, but see they are suited to different yarn type.  So I said all that to say that I am glad I tried a different brand, which I was hesitant to do. 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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ZassZ wrote
on Jul 23, 2012 4:46 PM

HI dbaines,

I picked up a set of wooden needles this past week.  Different brand from my usual and I find that I really love them alot.  I sort of took it for granted that wooden needles behaved the same but see that they are more suited for the type of yarn and project I am working on now.  Although I still like the other brands of woods I have and will still use them, I do like the way these work especially well for the project.  I hesitated to purchase them at first but am glad I tried them.     

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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dbaines wrote
on Jul 23, 2012 7:04 PM

Good to hear that the experiment was a success!!

Danielle

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marywoods wrote
on Jul 30, 2012 1:19 PM

Dear Jaden,

When I teach a knitting class, I get the same question.  First of all, you need to find the ones that feel comfortable to you.  I also recommend that you spend the money to get a good set of needles.  My straights, I have collected over the years as I needed them for different projects.  I use the Clover, Takumi Bamboo.  They are lightweight and fairly flexible.  I like the feel of them in my hands. 

If you do a lot of knitting in the round, I would recommend a set of interchangeable needles.  I have the full set of Harmony Interchangeables from Knit Picks.  The Harmony set is laminated Birch and have a smooth surface.  I also have their try-it set that I keep handy when I am making sweaters.  With the stops that screw onto the cable you can make jumper needles in a variety of lengths.  Since I got my set several years ago, I seldom use my straights anymore except for small projects. 

They also make a set of sock needles that I use constantly.  They are a set of 6 sizes (0 to 3) and come 6 needles to a set in a plastic pouch.  One word of caution, keep them away from puppies!  I lost one set of tips and one set of the sock needles due to my overly enthusiastic and affectionate year old mutt who decide to jump up and say hi before I had a chance to set my knitting down.  If he were a little lap dog I doubt that it would have been a problem, however at a year old he weighs around 100 pounds.

 

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