Mittens on two circular needles

This post has 13 Replies | 2 Followers
Not Ranked
Posts 2
Judy@9 wrote
on Oct 12, 2008 1:50 PM

 I would like some suggestions from knitters who have successfully knit one mitten or two mittens at a time on two circular needles.  I will be experimenting with this problem myself.  Thanks, Judy in Alaska

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 17
Lora Clare wrote
on Oct 13, 2008 10:48 PM

What do you want suggestions about? 
I am all for knitting two at a time! It creates two matching mittens, unless you use variegated yarn. Then they don't quite match, everything but the color matches. I just made a pair of mittens on one really really long circular needle. It's the same technique as with two circular needles pretty much. 

Hope this helps!
~Lora in Washington (lol) 


Not Ranked
Posts 7
knitngrammy wrote
on Oct 14, 2008 12:13 AM

 Hi Judy,   I have done two mittens on a long circular needle as in magic loop knitting socks. I do the thumbs facing each other in the center, as if looking at the back of hands wearing the mittens. I use stitch markers for the increases for the thumbs--one for each side of the thumb, and put the thumb stitches on waste yarn as a holder when you get to that point. the yarn is flexible and doesn't get in the way until the rest of the mitten is finished. then go back to the thumbs with DPN's--haven't found any other way to do the thumb. There isn't enought room to work with even a shorter circ needle. hope this helps--good luck--

I started doing this to keep the grand sons happy so one didn't have a pair of mittens that were finished before the other one. I do one for each of the two boy's at the same time.

 

Carol J

Top 500 Contributor
Posts 14
LaurieB wrote
on Nov 7, 2008 8:28 AM

 I've found that if I get very short (around 5") dpns it makes the thumbs very easy.  This also works on fingers for gloves.

 

Not Ranked
Posts 5
lkmknits wrote
on Jan 31, 2009 7:29 AM

I did a search on google and found this article.  Can't remember what the site was--if I do, I will send it to you.  Anyway, I copied the article, because I wanted to do the same thing.  I love knitting mittens, and this seemed the best way to do two at a time.  (Just checked--the site is knitlikeapirate.com)  Hope this helps, although you may have gotten lots of info by now.

Good luck--Linda from CT       lkmknits

 

Two Circular Items at Once on Two Circular Needles

Ye need two circulars of the same size, and two balls of yarn (or a center-pull ball, and work from the outside and the inside at once).

Cast on:

Using two circular needles of the same size, cast on to each needle and join in the round as if you were starting two projects at the same time.  Note red is one round object, blue is the other round object. Grey is needle number one. Black is needle number two.  (Picture is missing.  If you find the site, you will see it.)

Dividing:

Now decide how many stitches is half the cast-on circle, and starting in the middle of the circle, put the tip of the left needle through half the stitches on your right needle.

The left needle now has its own cast-on, plus it is sharing half the stitches of the right cast-on.

Withdraw the old needle from the shared stitches. The right needle now only has half of the cast-on stitches.

Using the free end of the right needle and starting at the join, put half the left stitches on the former right needle. Now the needles are more like a top and bottom needle.

Withdraw the old needle from the shared stitches. Each needle should now have either the top or bottom half of the cast-on stitches.

The working yarn should come out the same place on both cast-on circles.

Knitting:

The thing to remember is that you switch your needle, or switch your working yarn, but never both at once.

Start at the right-most circle. Find the working yarn for that circle and move the stitches onto the hard part of the bottom needle.

Take the left point of the bottom needle, and bring it over to the working yarn.

Knit as usual.

When you get to the place where you run out of stitches, DROP THE YARN.

Pick up the next working yarn, and shift the stitches onto the point.

Knit as usual.

Huzzah! Ye've completed half a round.

Now turn the whole octopussy mess around clockwise, and do it again. You have now completed a round. Sure, it took ye twice as long, but you have twice as much knittin' to show for it, and no lonely orphaned socks.*

*Obviously, pirates with alternate limb-choices may not need such.

 

Not Ranked
Posts 2
kimtoyna wrote
on Oct 26, 2011 8:40 AM

found the site and it is great  http://www.knitlikeapirate.com/index.shtml  now i can start the  christmas gifts

Not Ranked
Posts 14
Lori1551 wrote
on Nov 7, 2011 8:37 AM

Knitting Two-at-a-Time is all I ever do now for mittens and socks. My video might just help you out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75KFz2gmmSM

If you have any questions please feel free to ask... and if you like my video, click on Subscribe and you will get all my future video's... and check out the other 9 videos I have... might be helpful to you.

Lorraine

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 407
Merlich wrote
on Nov 7, 2011 9:39 PM

Hi Lorraine,

I am about to start knitting socks. My first pair of socks. I found a spool of a very thin elastic thread at the supermarket. I want to know if you use it along the whole leg or just a few rows.

Thank you.

Patience, persistence and love are the main ingredients for wonderful knittings.

Not Ranked
Posts 14
Lori1551 wrote
on Nov 9, 2011 6:27 AM

I tried knitting with elastic only once and I honestly did not see a difference in the finished object.  From what I can see and this is my opinion only, I have found that if the cuff/leg is too tight, it tends to roll down.  You want it to fit comfortably, not too tight and not too loose.  

I am really not the one to ask for socks as I have only made 5-6 pairs.  I don't like making socks.

Is there anyone out there that can help here?

Lorraine

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 407
Merlich wrote
on Nov 9, 2011 6:05 PM

Hi Lorraine,

Thank you for making time to answer my question. It is just that I can see the socks I buy from the stores and they have that elastic thread along the cuff and others along the entire leg. That is why I can't imagine to knit a pair of socks without that elastic thread. I wouldn't like to have the socks all rolled over my ankles, like a pair of dougnuts.

I'll try to find out the answer. Thanks anyway.

Patience, persistence and love are the main ingredients for wonderful knittings.

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,589
Zoe wrote
on Nov 9, 2011 7:56 PM

Merlich:

Hi Lorraine,

I am about to start knitting socks. My first pair of socks. I found a spool of a very thin elastic thread at the supermarket. I want to know if you use it along the whole leg or just a few rows.

Thank you.

 

Hi Merlich,   The elastic thread is often used in knitting the cuff of socks and mittens.  You do want the cuff to hug your leg/wrist but not too tightly.  You would maybe want to knit some cuffs using different ribbing to see which cuff ribbing works best for you with the elastic thread.  You dont want to get your thread tension so tight that it really binds and wont go on over the heel/hand.

Your ribbing can be k1, p1.  or k2,p2  or k3, p3.   Personally I like the k2, p2 ribbing.  For myself, I have found that I dont need the elastic thread when I knit my socks.   What yarn are you planning to use for your socks?? and what is your pattern??   I love the Ann Budd book that I bought here titled "Getting Started Knitting Socks".   It is so easy to understand and she gives the basic sock pattern directions for whatever weight of yarn you have and what ever needle sizes you have too!  Plus she gives the directions for knitting a no holes gusset!!

Happy knitting, Zoe

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 407
Merlich wrote
on Nov 9, 2011 9:32 PM

Hi Zoe,

Thank you very much for your answer. I also have a book, it is called "Knitting the Perfect Pair, Secrets to Great Socks" by Dorothy T. Ratigan. Like yours, mine also has almost the same kind of information but, there she doesn't say anything about when you need to use elastic thread. I am going to use cotton 100% and needles size 0 . I've already made a cardigan with cotton 100% worsted weight. I used needles size 8 and, the ribbing for the cuff is k2, p2 but, unfortunately is now stretched. That is why I want to use the elastic thread. The socks are for my husband and he asked me to use cotton so, I'll have to find out what happens. I have enough yarn to make a test, one sock with elastic and the other without it. In case the elastic would be necessary I found a way to introduce the elastic in a finished garment. And in case it became a mess, I'll knit a new one. Ha ha!

Anyway, I'll buy the book you've recomended to me. I think they have it where I use to buy yarn.

Happy knitting to you too Zoe!

Patience, persistence and love are the main ingredients for wonderful knittings.

Not Ranked
Posts 1
jesasaurus wrote
on Nov 24, 2011 7:36 AM

Hello Judy, 

        I was just working on the same conundrum when I realized that starting from the fingertip end was what I needed to do because my children and my sister in law have asked for mittens. When I knit, I often make minor adjustments as I go along and when I get to the second item, I cannot remember where I made all those adjustments and the items never match. So I picked a book up: Toe-Up 2-at-a-Time Socks by Melissa Morgan-Oakes and I used that cast on (I think it is called Judy's magic cast on--I know I have seen it on Knitty.com). 

        I cast on 16 stitches for each mitten (using Caron Simply Soft) [that is 8 on the top needle and 8 on the bottom needle for each mitten] onto my circulars, and increased every other row/round until they are both as wide as I want, then I leave a space open for the thumb, decrease to a comfortable wrist measurement, and rib until I feel like casting off. Its great because I can try them on as I go, and I know my sister in law has longer fingers than me, so I just make them a little longer in the beginning. I have to pay close attention during the first couple of rounds, but they are only 16 stitches each, so it goes quickly. They get easier and easier as I go along.

Not Ranked
Posts 1
BarbaraEll wrote
on Dec 28, 2011 9:46 PM

I am in the midst of a pair of mitts using the two mittens (socks) on two circs technique for the first time. All has gone very well until I needed to put the thumb gusset stitches on waste yarn. I had set up my thumbs in the middle, facing each other, but could not for the life of me figure out how to park those stitches while knitting around; the working yarn was in the wrong place to do that on the first side of the second mitten. (If you really want to know :)  it was midway through the thumb gusset.)

This evening I hope I have solved the problem by moving one mitt to the other end of the two circular needles. Now the thumbs are at the ends of the needles, where you switch needles but keep knitting the same mitten (sock, mitt) with the same yarn.

I hope this is right -- I think it is right -- we shall see shortly!

Other than this pretty pickle I got myself into, the two at a time thing is absolutely fabulous. I'm knitting wide stripes in a contrasting variegated yarn, and everything I did with mitt A I repeated immediately on mitt B (and then the second side of mitt A). Love, love, love it.

Page 1 of 1 (14 items) | RSS