Neatening the back of yarn embroidery

This post has 10 Replies | 3 Followers
Top 75 Contributor
Posts 74
on Nov 11, 2012 7:31 AM

Hello fellow yarn addicts.

I've recently been embroidering with yarn, and something has been bothering me. I've just completed a baby jacket with some embroidery on the front, and the back of the embroidery is totally out of control. The garment is knitted in double knit yarn, and the embroidery is also done in dk yarn, and consists of vines (chain),  flowers (lazy daisy) and french knots in three different colours.

The embroidery tails did not respond well to being woven into the back of the fabric, as the contrasting colours showed through the front. So I knotted them very tightly, which worked rather well on some parts, but in other parts there were so many threads that I ended up creating a mousenest on quite a visible part of the garment (the inner front).

SO, in anticipation of future encounters with this problem, does anyone have any tips for me please?

Also, would it be worth lining that section with a small bit of cotton, just to hide the hideousness; If so, how would I go about this?

Thanks for any suggestions.

(I've also posted this question in the Sew Daily forums - I need all the help I can get on this.)

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 729
salmonmac wrote
on Nov 11, 2012 1:37 PM

The only trick I know for neatening the ends is to embroider over the initial one as you work your stitches. Then you only have to weave in the final end. I'm also interested in some tips here.

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,806
ZassZ wrote
on Nov 11, 2012 7:51 PM

Hi Askhouse,

I use a bit of light weight facing - the kind used in sewing garment construction.  You can either cut the facing to fit the small space and place it on the back where you want to embroider either basting in place, pinning it temporarily - when you start your embroidery stitches it will be secured as you go along with your stitches and stay in place.  then you can trim it down more if you like or evern cover the messy stitches with an iron on piece the same size being careful to heat it only over the space where you have your embroidery stitches.  (That is ONLY if you can you a little heat on your garment)  Normally when embroidering you do not KNOT your threads on the back, but instead weave the thread tails in as you proceed with your embroidering then you won't have the bumps and knots and frayed ends sticking out which bother you to look at.  If you leave a longer tail you can work those threads in as you go along as I said above, and then trim all the losse ends off without worrying about the stitches coming loose because you already weaved them in quite securely. 

I hope this suggestion helps.

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

Top 75 Contributor
Posts 74
on Nov 12, 2012 2:21 PM

Hi ZassZ,

Thank you for your suggestion - I'll try this if/when I do a more complex piece of embroidery

With the recently completed piece, I could not really do this, as the embroidery was quite sparse - a few flowers placed quite far apart. The vine tails were easy to weave, as they just went back into the vines, but with the flowers and knots, there was really nothing to weave them into. As I said, the knots did not cause a problem in some places, but in other places I had a lot of threads and literally nowhere to hide them.

Thanks very much for your tips on lining too. I'll probably put in a patch of printed cotton (I've got a very cute scrap in my stash), which will hopefully look as though it was all part of the design.

I think in retrospect I can see the mistakes that i have made in this piece, which is a good thing, because my next piece will be 100% perfect (this one was only 99% Crying ).

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,806
ZassZ wrote
on Nov 16, 2012 11:27 AM

Hi Askhouse,

I follow what you are explaining re the vines, flowers & knots. Not a whole lot to hide threads . In this case, I sometimes just let the thread travel to where I am starting the next stitch, catch the tail of that thread with the new thread (different or same color doesn‘t matter) and then keep stitching while weaving the old thread tail into the new. At least the tails are secured in this way. Then the patch of lining covers the exposed side.

I like your little cotton patch idea. I did a pocket I embroidered and beaded and threads will be on inside of pocket. Even though I don’t want the threads to be seen on the inside so I will put a patch over it before I sew it down on the garment.

So do hate the messy sewing but love the neat sewing. Sure you will be 100% satisfied with it.  Glad you are enjoying your project and maybe you could share your pic of it over on Fabulous Projects Completed Lately topic under the Knitting Chat Forum page. Looking forward to it if you can!

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

Not Ranked
Posts 1
on Nov 16, 2012 12:51 PM

I am a knitter, and take issue with weaving in ends.  I "split" the yarn tail then weave these two strands back over a few finished stitches in 2 parallel lines and tie a knot.  This knot is half the size it would be if I did not "split" the yarn and is much more aesthetically palatable.  I know it's cheating, but "Any port in a storm."

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,806
ZassZ wrote
on Nov 16, 2012 2:52 PM

Hi Judith,

That's fine.  I personally don't like knots anwhere except if they are French knots.  I love those!  I was speaking of embroidery with thread which can also be split or as I was mentioning, using the "catch" method.  Which ever way works best for you is the best way, I say. 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

Top 75 Contributor
Posts 74
on Nov 27, 2012 4:02 AM

So much great advice on this thread. (It's true - knitters are caring, lol!)

Your splitting method is particularly useful if you've been knitting with any yarn thicker that double knit - it definitely prevents the bulk that can result from going over the same place twice.

When weaving ends after knitting, I do not knot the woven tails, because if you weave a long enough tail and follow the stitching, that is normally secure enough. For a more slippery yarn, doubling back into the last few stitches should keep it in place. Also, once an item has been washed a few times, the ends pretty much become "set" and you don't have to worry about anything unravelling.

In this case, I am forced to knot, but I'm being as neat as I can, and I'll definitely be taking all of your advice into account.

Top 75 Contributor
Posts 74
on Nov 27, 2012 11:48 AM

Update

Here are the knots:  and the front:  .

I have not snipped the tails yet - I'm a bit paranoid, even though they are double knotted. See how the two flowers are miles apart?

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,806
ZassZ wrote
on Nov 28, 2012 5:11 PM

Hi askhouse,

Looks pretty good!  Nice and neat.  As I am sitting here, I just had a thought you may want to put in your tip box for next time.  What about a little bit of fabric glue on the tips of your thread ends?  It might work out fine for those far apart ends.  Just a a little double insurance instead of knotting. 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

Top 75 Contributor
Posts 74
on Dec 6, 2012 4:56 AM

BRILLIANT.

I shall definitely keep your fabric glue tip in mind for future reference - so simple but so usable!

Thanks so much also for taking an interest in helping me out with this challenge (and everyone else who posted comments) - I really appreciate it.

___

(For those who might just have found this thread: the project is successfully done now, and it's been given to the little birthday girl, whom I hope will enjoy wearing it.)

Page 1 of 1 (11 items) | RSS