weave and knit

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Liz Gipson wrote
on May 20, 2008 9:43 AM

Is anyone out there combing weaving and knitting?  I wove the body of a shorty jacket on a rigid heddle loom and added knitted sleeves.  It was the best of both worlds--the great drape and speed of weaving and the fabulous shaping of knitting. I know there must be folks out there doing the same and I am eager to hear what you are up to.

 Liz Gipson

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AmyCM wrote
on May 20, 2008 10:28 AM

That's a great idea!

That goat is too cute. How do you stand it?


--Amy Clarke Moore


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MelissaM wrote
on May 23, 2008 2:31 PM

I love the combination of knit and weave.  I did a couple of sweaters where I wove the sleeves and body, then knit the cuffs, the collar and the bottom waist band (temporary brain short circuit!  I cannot think of the name for the k2p2 knit bank at the bottom of a sweater!  Arghh).  Like you I love the two different feels in the same garment.  Currently, I have a kit from Halycon for a lovely sweater with knit Greek Key like pattern on the sleeves.  It will be next up on my loom.  I am wondering about adapting some of the patterns from Knits for weaving/knitting.  Some of the structures are very weaverly.

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SaraJ wrote
on May 25, 2008 8:48 PM

I'm a very new weaver (well, still staring at the inkle loom I had my father make me last fall, and have a weave-it square I've not taken off the loom yet, lol!) but I was thinking the inkle would make perfect straps for one of those mesh market/shopping bags, or strap/top edge . . . .


Also, for Kimono-style or inspired tops (IW has that yummy Kimono based book) Inkle weavings might go fabulously just under the bust.  Depending on the type of top, but I think you know what I mean . . .I'm figuring I'd start off combining weaving and knitting though first with the handle/strap thing, I think.


Now I just need to start!  I've read alot, I just need to DO now! Oh!  Another idea occurred to me . . . do a hairband, half inkle, half knit.  My hair is long enough, just wear whichever look up front/top I'd like.  Maybe, maybe not, spur of the moment Idea . . .



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Liz Gipson wrote
on May 27, 2008 3:15 PM

Oh, good ideas.  So if you were going to adapt a Knits pattern, which one would it be?  I can see adapting the cover sweater from the Spring 2008 issue by weaving the body and then knitting the sleeves and yoke.  I'm not much of a sewer so I have to keep it pretty simple. 

To SaraJ--if you are looking for a good first inkle projects we have a cute inkle iPod bag with a warping illustrations.  http://www.interweave.com/weave/projects_articles.asp.  I adore my little inkle loom.  One of my favorite techniqes is tublar weave where you always enter the shuttle on the same side to form a woven tube. 

(I am the managing editor of Handwoven.  We are going to have our names and titles added to our avatars soon.  I just thought I should let you know who I am.  There is no way I'm going to use my ugly mug as my avatar when I could put a photo of one of my cashmere goats.  The photo is of Bella Goatarella.)

 

 

 Liz Gipson

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SaraJ wrote
on May 27, 2008 3:38 PM

I guess we've got your goat, then!  (teehee!Wink

I'll take a look at that project.   Thanks for the link!  I've read about tubular weave - it's intrugued me!  I have the book by Helene Bress, one by Eric(k)a ?(sp) somebody, and recently successfully stalked the one by, heck I'm bad w/names today, and alphabet how-to is only a small part of the book, but that probably tells you which, usually sells around $42 ebay, I stalked and got it for $8 (before shipping!).  Woohoo!  Anyway, those r my three books, I wanted to have a nice little basics library to start with, and I feel I have it now.  For the inkle loom.  Not that there isn't always more to learn, I'm not saying that at all!!  just, that third one I was stalking on ebay was a fun coup.

I've read the other two, and became glad that I started off with both purchases (after having read several others checked out from the library, one of which I thought more basic and helpful for a beginner than even these two!).  The opinions of varied weavers, and preferences, can be so different, and their perspectives, that I am glad to have both.  Also, their treatment of the subject matter, their approaches, presentation, types of projects, etc. just are different as well.

I also became really glad that I had read this one book, by, let's see, Frances . . . Smith?  NOt sure, it's kinda thin, hardback, almost reminds one of a smallish hardback child's picturebook, in size.  That one that I checked out of the library, initially, last fall, and read through, I would not let myself proceed until I could picture exactly the process and motions of what they were doing.  This from someone who had never woven before, so it did take re-reading some of the paragraphs or sections a couple times.  I have an excellent imagination though.  It was a most excellent exercise, and the closest thing to actually doing it that I could at the time! 

It was from this, and a book entitled something like Band Weaving by Harry somebody or other and some lady (sorry, really bad with the names today!), that they encouraged me to see if my dad (a woodworker) could build me an inkle loom!.  Since each book had plans for a loom, I assumed that meant they did not have a problem with a temporary working copy for using in the wood workshop, so I copied the pertinent pages and discussed the pros and cons w/my dad, and what an inkle loom was, so he'd understand the process a bit, and understand what I was asking, and the why's of needing the depth of seating the rods an inch in, in hardwood, and such, etc. 

Anyway, sorry to go on!  I do plan on subscribing to your magazine at some point this year, understanding that most of it will not involve such simple looms, but I still want to!   I even am on the cusp of understanding ONE of the aspects of the particular ways designs can appear in the face of the warp-faced weave, and how that relates to the draft, and how to design that - I can ALMOST feel my mind wrap around that - it's cool, knowing I'm possibly close intellectually on one of those.  I just need to play!

It's like a thought exercise, logic puzzle and fiber play all in one!  Gee, I think I'm going to like weaving - I love color, too, and tactile (which is EXCELLENT treatment for my panic attacks), and a challenge is good too . . . .


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Liz Gipson wrote
on Jun 2, 2008 9:29 AM

Heh, heh, heh, you do have my goat and isn't she beautiful. 

I adore Helen Bress.  She is such a wonderful person and really pushed the limits of that little loom.  Sound like you have the books and the loom and now it is time to get weaving!  I was on the Schacht Spindle Company website the other day and noticed that they have a new streaming video on their site about how to warp and weave with an inkle loom: www.schachtspindle.com.

We do have one or two "off loom" projects in every issue of Handwoven, so you may be surprised to find that there is more for you in the magazine than you thought.  Starting with the September/October issue we are giving the magazine a whole new look and introducing new departments that have lots of tips and tricks for new and experienced weavers alike. Check us out!

Personally, I'm passionate about the rigid heddle loom. It's so easy to warp and travels well.

Let me know when you get you first project off the loom!

P.S. What's on my loom? I working on a shawl on my rigid heddle loom that is warped with 4-ply worsted-weight wool/microfiber /cashmere blend that runs around 900 yds per pound. Using mohair, I'm spacing bands of leno and brooks bouquet with plain weave. I can't wait to get it off the loom.

What's on my needles? A wee headband in handspun cashmere worked up in St. John's Wort lace. Lace is so much faster on the loom!

 

 Liz Gipson

Managing Editor, Handwoven

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KateC wrote
on Aug 9, 2008 5:31 PM

 I have been working on combining for a couple years with more failures than successes.

Wove a tabbard (meant to be more like a ruana but major yarn snaffu) and then knit the bottom in the round to hold it together. I forget if I knit or crocheted the neckline and armholes.

My dream is to weave double weave tubes and then knit a yoke with cap sleeves.

First I used a commercial fabric  and seamed up one side to make a tube during a class at Stitches-west. Then I knit from the top up  a wide band as a neckline and sleeves and knit another band at the bottom for a contrasting hem.

Next I had a piece of woven fabric and again sewed it as a tube. I started a top down raglan blouse and was going to sew the two together.  It looked awful so I just knit the whole blouse and still haven't decided what to do with the tube.

Kimono  next?

 

Kate

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HollyH wrote
on Aug 11, 2008 10:31 AM

 Years and years ago there was an article in Handwoven about combining knitting and weaving ,,, I think one was a cable sweater and the other was a pullover.  I'd like to see an update of that article. I can't tell you how many times I've pulled that article out and thought about doing the cable sweater. What I'd really like to do is a woven/knitting version of something like the Central Park Hoodie. 

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Liz Gipson wrote
on Aug 11, 2008 12:42 PM

Oh, now that is a good idea!  I wonder if I could talk Lisa into a collaboration......

 Liz Gipson

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MelissaM wrote
on Aug 11, 2008 4:41 PM

 I was just reading my Knitting Daily news letter and it shows a jacket that looks like it would be great for weaving or weaving and knitting.  It's called the Backstage Tweed Jacke (or something similar - mind like a sieve).  Anyway it has a wonderful tweedy yoke and stripes going down the front openings (can't think of the word).

On the subject of memory, is there anyone else out there who can't remember the words, but can visual the garment perfectly?  Obviously I am remembering only the important stuff!

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MelissaM wrote
on Aug 11, 2008 4:44 PM

 oh I would love to see that article!  what issue was it in?

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HollyH wrote
on Aug 11, 2008 5:26 PM

 I dug out the old issue of Handwoven (J/F 1995).  The ones I have been thinking about for the past 13 years :-) are the "Aran Puzzle Sweaters", page 46.  It's a really interesting article about combing weaving and Aran knitting...maybe since there aren't back issues for sale on the site, they would consider posting a PDF as a freebie...or updating the article in a future issue.

 

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dorroughmom wrote
on Oct 17, 2008 11:47 AM

 I have only been seriously weaving for a short time, I was given a rigid heddle loom many years ago as a teenager, and have toted it around ever since, pulling it out occasionally.  Last spring I decided it was time to get serious, and wove yardage for a jacket, that I was considering knitting cuffs and bands for.  The biggest problem I ran into was getting the gauges compatible.  I ended up doing sewn hems, but am still working on the compatability issue for other projects I plan.  I just got an old 4 harness table loom and want to do some diamond twill in hanspun for another jacket, time permitting.  My time is very full now - at the ripe old age of 43, I was accepted into the fiber arts program at Virginia Commonwealth University, and am now studying with Susan Iverson - dream come true but very demanding!  Maybe for some of my classes I'll learn how to combine knitting and weaving.

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on Oct 19, 2008 3:27 PM

 I've been "thinking" about combining the two but have just never gotten a "round-to-it".   Currently I've a 10th century honeycomb weave on my floor loom, my rigid heddle half-warped for a rep weave (which I've never done before) and teaching myself pickup on my inkle.

I've plans for a 11th century mantle for my brother-in-law that might lend itself nicely to a knitted edging - hmmmmm.

TS

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