The Yggdrasil Blanket: A Study in Elegance

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on Mar 12, 2010 1:35 PM

Can anyone tell me if there is a written and not chart pattern for the Yggdrasil Blanket?  I would like to try this pattern but I am not very good at knitting with charts.

 

Carol

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Crinaeae Rai wrote
on Mar 13, 2010 6:40 AM

There is no written pattern to my knowledge, but you could try hitting up Ravelry.  Honestly, I suggest taking this opportunity to get over your fear of charts.  I used to be afraid of charts as well, but once I learned how they work and how to read them, I never want to go back to just written out patterns.

So far, I have found the charts in this piece to be really easy.  One of the great things about this pattern's chart is that the center chart doesn't repeat.  So, after you're done each row, you can cross it off with a marker.  This way, you don't find yourself getting lost in the middle of all the symbols.

If all else fails, why don't you try writing out the chart yourself?

Best of luck,
Rai

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wwsusanb wrote
on Mar 13, 2010 2:02 PM

Okay, I'm ready to take up the challenge!  I've never knitted from a chart either and frankly, I'm terrified.  Up til now, whenever I've seen a beautiful pattern with a chart, I've squeezed my eyes shut and flipped the page, pretending I didn't see it.  Confused

In your post you said you learned how they work and how to read them.  Any thoughts on where I can get an understandable explaination?  Thanks for the inspiration to pry open my mind and expand my possibilities!  Susan

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Den ise wrote
on Mar 16, 2010 2:33 AM

Rai, hello. I admire, and am so envious of your confidence in using charts.  I'm also facing the challenge of using the Yggdrasil chart and can't get past the squares marked 'no stitch'.....   Please could you tell me how to interpret this.  I'm also used to UK abbreviations, so am re-learning knitting using USA abbreviations.  Am totally sold on US patterns and yarns!  I live in Australia (Tasmania)  where knitting isn't as passionate as in the UK or States, and there's very little help here.  I'm so keen on doing the blanket twice - as a gift each for my son and daughter.  I'll feel confident about starting if I know what 'no stitch' means, otherwise will just give up before I even begin......  Thanks..... Denise

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monkeysocks wrote
on Mar 16, 2010 9:58 AM

Don't give up! 'No stitch' is just a placeholder. Go to 'Blogs' at the top of the page, then select 'How to'. Check out the 12th article down - 'Reading Charts'. It explains the 'no stitch'.

Best regards and good luck!

 

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Crinaeae Rai wrote
on Mar 24, 2010 10:47 AM

Reading a chart is basically reading a pattern in a graphic form, rather than a written one, just like the difference between reading a comic book and a novel.  Each box is one stitch, and each symbol tells you what to do.  For example, the first row of the tree chart has three boxes, each with a dot that tells me to purl three times.  The only symbol that is tricky is the "no stitch" one.  All you have to do is just ignore it.  It's really freaky sounding, but once you get to those rows, it'll make sense.

Knit Scene Fall 2009 had a really good article about understanding charts.  You can also Google something like  "reading charts + knitting" and come up with a ton of sites that had very good explanations.

I hope that helps you!

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justin121 wrote
on Mar 24, 2010 11:03 AM

i can tell you

Smile

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wwsusanb wrote
on Mar 25, 2010 6:47 AM

Smile  Thank you so much for your help.  I think I understand the part about the symbols and and 'no stitch' boxes.  Do I read the second and succeeding rows always from the right to left or are the even rows read from the left to the right?  Sorry to need such baby step instructions but this could open my knitting up to so many more possibilities!  Again, thanks for the help! 

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Crinaeae Rai wrote
on Apr 3, 2010 9:32 AM

It's not a problem!  We were all beginners once.

When knitting in the round, every row is read from left to right.  When knitting flat, the right side rows are read left to right, and the wrong side rows are read from right to left.

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