OFFICIAL POST: The Caftan Pullover Knit-Along (It's the Knit-Ball knit-along!)

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MarloesD wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 10:26 AM

Ilene201:

I love this design but I'm not sure about the wide open front. Do you think it would work with lacing or some other way to hold it sort of closed? I'm afraid it will not be flattering on my pear-shaped body the way it is. Thanks, Ilene

 

 

Hi Ilene, I'm going to wear a T-shirt under the kaftan. Then the kaftan keeps his character.

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on Sep 24, 2010 10:34 AM

I've never done a KAL nor have I knitted anything to wear requiring seams.  I did however, just for hoots vote for this Caftan Pullover, and therefor feel it right that I jump in and brave something new. Just downloaded the pattern and will catch up to the schedual. Happy knitting everyone.

Looking forward to seeing all the different results

 

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qwikwited wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 11:13 AM

I bought the pattern and was about to purchase my yarn when I realized the pattern was charted. I have never done charts before and am completely intimidated by them. I've got decent knitting skills otherwise, but I look at charts and my eyes start to cross...

I'm still on the fence as to whether to give this a go or not. Any advice on working from charts? Has anyone ever "translated" a chart into written words? I was thinking of doing that, to make it easier for me. Is it practical?

 

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itzme wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 11:51 AM

Try it.  You may find it easier to use if you can get over your fear long enough to give it a shot. I tried to make an Aran sweater from written instructions and flipping back and forth to the correct sections then trying to read the words and finally execute the stitches drove me batty!!  I knit a completely different sweater out of that yarn. When the pattern appeared charted, I was able to do not one but two Aran sweaters!  MUCH MUCH MUCH easier.  I now will only work with charts.  So much so that I will make a chart if only written instructions are given! 

I would advise you to take a chart, cast on a few stitches and try working JUST the chart as practice using junk yarn.  This way you can see for yourself before investing all your time effort and $$$ on a project which you cant' do.  You could then take the charts and make words out of them if you REALLY can't use charts BUT want the sweater no matter what!

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MarloesD wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 12:03 PM

Well, you read charts from the right to the left, starting with the lowest row. Chart A and B of this pattern have a 1 indicating the first row, a 3 indicating the 3d, ...

In chart A, the first row starts with a blank square. In the legenda at the right, you see that this means "k on RS; p on WS". So if you are at the Right (R) side (S) of your work, i.e. the side that everybody will see, you have to knit (k) this stitch. The wrong (W) side of your work is turned towards your body. Now the second is a square with a dot in it. This represents "p on RS; k on WS". So you have to purl this stitch. The third is a blank square again, meaning that you have to knit; etc.

If you translate the chart into written words, you get this for the first round of chart A: knit 1, purl 1, knit 1, purl 1, knit 1, purl 1, knit 2 (because you see two blank squares). Now for chart A and B this is possible but if you do this for all the charts, you are sick and tired of the pattern even before you start to knit... Therefore I always translate the squares into stitches in my mind, working them at the same time.

Now I just saw Itzme's advice coming in. This is such a wonderful idea of you! Maybe you can try this and make pictures of this. Then we can check if we have the same.

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on Sep 24, 2010 2:18 PM

I am also living in Italy, and I decided on Baby Night from Bollicine, which gives me the right gauge knitting with 5mm needles.

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JamieFKnits wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 2:22 PM

Knitting one for myself and one for my dau. Affordability made me choose I Love This Yarn! for both - deep red for me, deep blue for her. We'll look KEEN!

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Ilene201 wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 3:17 PM

Thank you so much! Looks like some great knitters figured this out for me.

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Ilene201 wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 3:25 PM

Here's how I do charts: first I make a copy of the chart and blow it up large enough so I can really see it. I make as many copies as I need. Then as I do each row I mark it off with a yellow highlighter. That way I can keep my place as I go. If the pattern is really complicated I first mark up the chart with different color highlighters to indicate the different stitches or different colors. Then when I move onto the next part I start with a new copy. This makes it much easier to follow charts although it makes it feel more boring. But boring is better than ripping out and redoing!

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ArtfulSoul wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 3:50 PM

Another tip to help get over the fear of charts.  The Life Line.  It will likely come up again when we all start knitting.  The Life Line is a spare length of contrast color yarn, that you thread on a needle, and carefully pull it through the stitches just worked on your needle. You leave it there, and in the unfortunate event that you need to rip out work, you at least will have "captured" the stitches at this point, and they are easy to put back onto a needle. At the end of the project, or maybe when you don't need that particular Life Line anymore, just pull out the thread.

For complicated patterns, a Life Line may be inserted at a logical point in the chart, usually after an all-purl row, and you can note which row on your pattern notes.

So, breathe and try something complicated! When you see you have successfully finished a section, do the Life Line, and knit forth with confidence.

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ArtfulSoul wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 3:52 PM

MarloesD:
Hi Ilene, I'm going to wear a T-shirt under the kaftan. Then the kaftan keeps his character

 

This is an interesting item to note for all of us.  Consider what you may or may not be wearing underneath, and then allow enough ease in selecting the size to knit.

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Zoe wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 4:47 PM

qwikwited:

I'm still on the fence as to whether to give this a go or not. Any advice on working from charts? Has anyone ever "translated" a chart into written words? I was thinking of doing that, to make it easier for me. Is it practical?

Hi quikwited,

Not everyone can work from a chart.  I am one of them.  I have dyslexia and I copy line, by line, the entire chart out.  I start at the bottom right hand corner of the chart and go across to the left side (this is the right side of your knitted work).  For the next line on the chart, I read left to right and write it out (this is the wrong side of your work).  Most charts are read right to left, left to right, and bottom to top.  When I write out my lines, I read the chart bottom to top but write it out from top to bottom (the natural progression of the written pattern).  As I have finished writing out each line, I highlight it so that I can keep tract of where I am at.  Sometimes I will then type out the pattern and save it to a disk for later use when using the pattern again.

Hope this helps you and don't be intimidated by the chart, everyone works a little differently.  And we are all here to help you along, Zoe Smile

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qwikwited wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 5:20 PM

Thanks you everyone for your tips!  I went and picked up one ball of the yarn I am considering using (Caron Spa) - I figured, while I am trying to see if I can conquer the chart, I may as well see if I like the stitch definition while I am at it.

Zoe, have you already written this one out? If you have, can I pleeeeeeeeaaaaassssseee get a copy? And if you haven't done it yet, maybe we could divide the work up and get it done twice as quickly. Just an idea.

ArtfulSoul - I've never used a Life Line before, but I will be this time!

Thanks again for all your help ladies. Big Smile

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DeborahC53 wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 5:36 PM

ArtfulSoul:
Another tip to help get over the fear of charts.  The Life Line. 

I had never used a lifeline before when someone mentioned this in the last KAL.  I found this video which shows how the lifeline is used and good tips on how to put one in.  Before I found this I basically weaved it in and it was time consuming. The ways shown in this video are easy and quick.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XS8qzSaJnZA

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Zoe wrote
on Sep 24, 2010 6:22 PM

qwikwited:
Zoe, have you already written this one out?

 

Hi Qwikwited,

No I haven't done so.  I have too many things on my plate at home so I haven't much time for any knitting.  (My husband is transitioning from home hemodialysis over to peritoneal dialysis.  All our specialists are in the city which is a 3 hour drive from here.  Many tests and procedures need to be done in the process.)  But do not worry.  Just take your chart and write out the first line.  Put the chart down and then in 1/2 hr proofread your first line and make sure that you have transcribed correctly.  It is the first line that is the hardest to do and then the rest will come easier.  Because of my dyslexia, I can not knit and translate each little square into a stitch. 

Don't worry, as there are lots of knitters who will help you translate.  Not everyone is able to follow a chart, and I do understand that some knitters are very capable of doing so.  A chart is made for knitting and crochet projects because it works the same in any language.  I know that the thought of writing it out may be a little scary.  On another KAL someone suggested color coding their chart.  Why don't you get a few different colored highlighters and "color" code your stitches.  ie. yellow for knit stitches, orange for purl, etc.   For you, it may work.  There are many ways of learning to knit a project. 

Good luck with this and let us know how you make out.  Zoe Smile

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