How to uncurl circular knitting needles

This post has 8 Replies | 4 Followers
Not Ranked
Posts 3
Waldine wrote
on Jan 27, 2011 3:49 PM

I have never seen this question on any blog before so I must be the only knitter that doesn't know the answer to it.  I have a problem with the plastic line between the needle points curling on me and getting in the way of my knitting.  They come curled in the package when I buy them and they stay curled until my knitting is heavy enough to weigh it down. Has anyone else had this problem ?  Is there a way to straighten the curl? I have about 16 circular needles that are curled and I have to store them curled because I don't know how to uncurl them !  Someone, anyone. help,please.

Not Ranked
Posts 1
cpaeper wrote
on Jan 27, 2011 7:31 PM

I boil a cup of water in the microwave and then soak only the plastic line in the hot water for a few minutes.  Then remove and slightly tug the line.  I also store mine over a hook or hanger rather then winding them back up into the package.  Hope this helps.

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,589
Zoe wrote
on Jan 28, 2011 4:49 AM

Waldine:
I have never seen this question on any blog before so I must be the only knitter that doesn't know the answer to it

 

HI Waldine,

You are not the only knitter who comes across this problem and so it has been answered and addressed many times on knitting daily.  What I do is to run the hot water in my kitchen sink and as it is running, pass the plastic back and forth through the hot water.  Keep the plastic lline straight and put a little tension on it.  Don't put the connecting points through the water. Hold the line straight for a minute afterwards.  See if it has uncurled enough for you and if not, repeat this.  I am a little timid to using boiling water but some also do that.

Happy knitting, ZoeSmile

Not Ranked
Posts 3
pegnmil wrote
on Jan 28, 2011 7:22 AM

agree with all the others to hold it over steam or dip in very hot water.   A tip so they don't get curly again and a handy storage piece - make yourself a circular knitting needle holder.  You can hang it on the wall of your craft room or on the back of a door using one of those over the door hangars. 

Buy some flexible plastic tubing at the hardware or building supply store.  You'll need at least a 1/4 inch opening.  I took my largest needles with me and ended up getting tubing with 1/2 inch opening to fit the largest needle in the group.   Cut the tubing into 2 - 3 inch length pieces, one for each circular needle you have.  Lay them out side by side (not end to end) so you have a verticle row of 2 inch plastic tubing pieces.  I tied mine together using yarn and a slipknot - then reinforced the connection with a big ol' patch of hot glue.  You could thread yours together like a bead necklace or just use plain super glue.  On one end string through a loop of yarn and knot it (that's your hangar).  With a sharpie pen write on your tubing the circular needle sizes you have.  Hang your line of tubing on the wall and start threading your cirular needles through.  The knitting needles hang down looking like a modern art sculpture.  You always know the size of needle you are grabbing, and those cirular needles don't get all tangled up with the rest of the knitting items anymore.

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,806
ZassZ wrote
on Jan 28, 2011 11:45 AM

Hi all

This was addressed back in November, 2010 under general knitting discussions, How Do I? re Kinks in Circular Needles.  I copied it below for you. 

ZassZ:

ZassZ:

The needles don't stay curled or kinked up because there's a little trick to keeping them uncurled.  Do you want to know what that is? 

Hi - the secret is to put a small pot of water on.  Bring to boil.  Turn off heat.  Hold needles in a u shape over the pot.  Dip your plastic cord portion only into the water for approx. 1 min.  Take out of water and then hold needle straight from one tip end and let hang straight down.  Then run your fingertips down the length of cord.  As the plastic cools it will be straight.  Do not put the portion in water where it joins, only up to about an inch away on each side from where they join.  Once you do this they will stay straightened out and you won't have to bother with it again.  Yes  I got this tip a long time ago and have used it ever since.  Have never had a pair of circulars give me any problem after that nor have they come apart.   It really works well.   

 

If you want you can also go back and read the other posts with suggestions for this as well.  Hope you try it it really works and you only have to do it one time when you boil the water first as directed above.  Wink

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

Not Ranked
Posts 3
Waldine wrote
on Jan 28, 2011 2:03 PM

My thanks to Pegnmil, Zoe and Cpaeper also for taking the time to reply to my post. I'm 78 and have been knitting and crocheting forever it seems, but just started using the long circulars about 3 years ago when I started making top down sweaters.  Thats about the only thing I make with the them. I may try other things now with the uncurled products. You women have been very kind to help me out.  Thanks again to all.

                            Waldine

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 1,806
ZassZ wrote
on Jan 28, 2011 6:24 PM

Hi pegnmil & Waldine, 

What a beautiful cat you have there. and  Waldine, hope you'll try your circular needles out on maybe a nice shawl or a vest or a hat!

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

Not Ranked
Posts 1
dstraveler wrote
on Jul 29, 2014 11:50 AM

I'm having a similar problem, except that my needles are starting to bend at the join. All the advice here says to NOT put the join over/in boiling water/steam. But that's exactly where my problem is. Does anyone have a solution?

Not Ranked
Posts 4
on Aug 23, 2014 6:41 PM

I do pretty much the same thing making sure to keep slight tension on each end of the plastic and not where the join to the needle is (don't ask, yes - learned the hard way!).

Page 1 of 1 (9 items) | RSS