Your best tips needed for k2tog and k3tog please!

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memoryln wrote
on Mar 28, 2011 12:35 PM

Hi Everyone!

I was wondering if you could share a tip for k2tog other than just "knitting 2 stitches together".  I am having some trouble doing it that way.  I tried looking online, but most tutorials only show tips for how to k3tog in a different way and the more I look the more confused I get because they are explaining it with more detail about right/left slants or one loop over the other...

Anyway my question is:  Is there a simple trick or alternative way to k2tog (and k3tog) by getting exactly the same result/look as if you were to literally "knit 2(or 3) stitches together"?

I would really appreciate some help!  Thanks!

 

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Posts 312
on Mar 28, 2011 2:03 PM

Nothing will look exactly like a K2tog.  That is the whole point of doing decreases different ways, to get those left and right slants, and sometimes to twist the stitch or not.

Usually if a pattern calls for k2tog it is paired with a decrease on the other end of the row/round that slants the opposite direction, so as to give shape to the garment.

I suspect what you are having trouble with is sliding you right needle under BOTH stitches.  It likely seems too tight which means your tension is tight.  Try knitting a little losser and then when it comes time to do a k2tog you will be able to slide your needle under those 2 stitches easier.

And, when you pull that new loop through, make it a little loose, as well, while you slide off the two old stitches.  Then you can tighten it up if needed once the new stitch is on your right needle.

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Posts 1,589
Zoe wrote
on Mar 28, 2011 3:25 PM

memoryln:
Is there a simple trick or alternative way to k2tog (and k3tog) by getting exactly the same result/look as if you were to literally "knit 2(or 3) stitches together"?

 

Hi Memoryln,

It all depends on which way you want the decrease to slant.

If you want the decrease to slant to the right, then you will knit 2 (or 3) together.  You must insert the right hand needle as if to knit the stitches.

If you want the decrease to slant to the left, then you will ssk.  This means take your right hand needle and inserting it as if to knit, slip the next stitch off the left needle and onto the right, do this with the next stitch on the left hand needle.  Put these two slipped stitches back onto the left needle and going through the back loops of these two stitches, knit them together.

This is knitting and yes it gets a little tricky -- your fingers and needles must become flexible pretzels to do this.  Especially the knit 2 (3) together.

Happy knitting, Zoe Smile

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Posts 4
on Apr 19, 2011 3:23 PM

Hi

As rochesterknitter has said, if you're finding this difficult your tension is probably tight.  I'd suggest slipping your 2 or 3 stitches onto a thin cable needle or even a darning needle, and then knitting them together off that - this should give you a bit of room to get your right-hand needle in the stitches.   It may take some practice at first but keep at it and it will come!

Best of luck

Bridget

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