Converting patterns to knitting in the round

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MyrnaH@4 Hmm [^o)] wrote
on Nov 28, 2011 4:02 PM

I'm wondering what are the disadvantages of converting a flat pattern to one knitted in the round. I hate making seams and can really see no reason for them in the body of a sweater. Why not just knit in the round placing all the shaping a stitch or two from the virtual edges (the place where the seams would be if knitted flat).

I was a prolific knitter many years ago and am just returning to it. So, I'm looking at the whole thing with new eyes. When I scan most of the sweater patterns I don't see any reason why they won't work out after the conversion.

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ZassZ wrote
on Nov 29, 2011 11:00 AM

If I can avoid a seam I will too, Myrna.  If I don't have to waste time seaming, then i can be knitting something else.   

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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MyrnaH@4 wrote
on Nov 30, 2011 11:39 AM

Well I just saw a rerun of Knitting Daily Show 208 about 'Seamless Knitting'. I think I'll try converting a couple of patterns and see how it looks.

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ZassZ wrote
on Nov 30, 2011 12:59 PM

Hi Myrna, 

Good idea.  You can try it out and see the difference.  A good exercise and boost your confidence in your knitting skills at the same time.  I like that idea. 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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SophieRose wrote
on May 25, 2012 7:27 AM

I do this most of the time. In my experience it usually works fine, but you have to make alterations to accommodate the differences in the way round knitting behaves:

 At the sides of garments you will find that unless you use some kind of false seam the drape will be different - the garment will stretch more horizontally and can end up wider than you need, and the hem will be pulled up shorter than it should be.  This is not such an issue if you're going for a swing or trapeze type shape, but it's a problem with more tailored effects. You can compensate for it by taking out a few extra stitches (you should take out the edge stitch of each piece anyway, because those are seam allowances) and/or you can create a false seam by, for instance, slipping the 'seam' stitch on alternate rounds. That will break up the stretch and make it hang more as intended.  You can also work it to advantage - if you want just the look of a seam but actually want maximum stretch, for instance in maternity or plus size garments - try just a line of purls up the 'seam' instead. In either case you may need to add a little extra length as well, and make sure you rely more on measuring than on row count for length.

Also remember that it won't work on self striping or self patterning yarns if you divide at the armholes and knit back and forth  - you'll end up with much wider stripes in the yolk/shoulder area!

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ZassZ wrote
on May 25, 2012 3:46 PM

Hi SophieRose,

Good suggestions & i liked your explanation & tips.

Thanks Myrna too.  I really like knitting this way. 

MyrnaH@4:
Why not just knit in the round placing all the shaping a stitch or two from the virtual edges (the place where the seams would be if knitted flat).

 

 And all the women who were wise of heart spun with their hands, and they kept bringing as yarn the blue thread and the wool dyed reddish purple, the coccus scarlet material and the fine linen.   Ex. 35:25 

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