Sweaters, Techniques, and Sandwiches: Knits Fall has it all

Sweaters

Can we all just pause for a moment and think on all of the sweaters just killing it in the anniversary issue? We have timeless, classic, and sophisticated patterns for both women and men. If I had the confidence to take on a sweater, I would be agonizingly torn over which one to start with. But for now, I am able to sticky-note the ones I will complete in the future.

I personally think mid-August is the perfect time to start your sweater as you have at least a month before pullovers are needed during the day (and not to only throw on in the brisk mornings and chilly evenings). But I have a sweater addiction, friends. I even wear cardigans in the summer because there’s just something about being surrounded by soft, knit fabric that is just so comforting. I have a feeling once I break into sweaters I will be working on them year-round. You can check out the sweaters offered in the 20th Anniversary Issue of Interweave Knits down below!

Interweave Knits Fall 2016—The Sweater Collection

Stunning right? There’s really a sweater for everyone. I am a new knitter and recently completed a lace-patterned scarf and am about to take on a hat with eyelets! Please wish me luck and let us all hope I will not have as many false starts (it took me about 6 rows to realize ‘yo’ did NOT mean to wrap the yarn and K1…). YouTube and my lovely coworkers have been endlessly helpful in my blunders. I won’t even go into detail about my panic over the accidentally dropped stitch.

I’ve found knitting to be so wondrous—especially in a world where all of our clothing is mass-produced—because you are able to make something truly unique. When you knit a pattern from our magazine your memories are infused into the work. Were you knitting while watching your athletes compete in the Olympics? Or perhaps you took your project to your new favorite movie or band in concert. Your memories are bookmarked in the stitches of your work.

When I look at what I’ve crafted, I can see that missed ‘yo’ because I was too engrossed in an episode of “Kitchen Nightmares” to follow the line. I can admire the perfect rows where I was listening to Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast, “Revisionist History” and remember the fear when I dropped two stitches at the end on purpose to make matching columns of dropped stitches and how quickly that fear turned into annoyance when the yarn I was using was too sticky to cascade down the scarf (imagine picking every stitch out all the way down your scarf… another lesson learned).

Speaking of fun but daunting lessons, we have an amazingly written article on steeking (yes, the technique where you CUT your preciously knit garment) by Mary Jane Mucklestone. She shares three methods (machine-sewn, handsewn, and crocheted) with easy to follow instructions. Seriously, it makes so much sense because she takes the time to explain the benefits of each technique and which types of yarn to use with the different methods. And this technique often comes in handy with sweaters!

Also make sure the check out “Unravelings” at the end of the magazine where Nancy Obremski narrates a harrowing tale on the dangers of knitting while being distracted by tasty sandwiches. The first three times I read this article my mouth hung agape, I cringed and laughed, and made sure everyone else in the office had experienced this story.

Get your Knits 20th Anniversary issue today, and I hope you enjoy it as much as (and hopefully more than) we did while making it.

Happy knitting,

Signature

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Other Things You May Like to Check Out:

Categories

Knitting Patterns, Sweaters

About sarahrothberg

Sarah Rothberg is the assistant editor for Interweave Knits. Graduating from the University of Missouri with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism, she has a diverse background in knitting, photography, videography, drawing, sculpting, writing, and painting. She started learning textile arts with embroidery and crochet from her great-grandmother and grandmother and started knitting in college by making scarves for her friends. She now aspires to take on more complex projects and break out of her scarf-centric comfort zone.

Comment