Interweave Knits Fall 2010 Galleries

We now have two options for viewing the fall gallery. You can scroll down to find the sweaters grouped by model, or go here to find the sweaters grouped by pattern. To start, we're going to do this one by person so you can see what all of the sweaters look like on each gallery gal.

Here are the sweaters as shown in the magazine.


   The Breacan Swing Coat
by Gwen Bortner
Sample sweater measures 40"

Yarn: Zitron Nimbus (held doubled)
Needles: Size 13 US
Gauge: 12 sts and 18 rows = 4" in Stockinette stitch

      The Chiral Cardigan
by Coralie Meslin
Sample sweater measures 36"

Yarn: Rowan Lima
Needles: Size 10 US
Gauge: 16 sts and 22 rows = 4" in Stockinette stitch

The Cloisonne Jacket
by Deborah Helmke
Sample sweater measures 38"

Yarn: Berocco Ultra Alpaca
Needles: Sizes 6 and 7 US
Gauge: 18 sts and 18 rows = 4" in stranded st on larger needles; 18 sts and 22 rows = 4" in Stockinette st on smaller needles

The Leyfi Pullover
by Rosemary (Romi) Hill
Sample sweater measures 36"

Yarn: S. Charles Collezione Tinka;
Filatura di Crosa Superior (held together)
Needles: Size 10 US
Gauge: 14 sts and 22 rows = 4" in Stockinette stitch

And here's the gallery!
Sucia usually wears a size 8 top. She's 5' 9" tall.
Bust: 36"
Waist: 30"
Hips: 38"
      
As usual, Sucia looks great in everything! The Leyfi is especially great on her with it's long sleeves that are exactly the right length for her. The Chiral Cardigan also fits Sucia well, though I think it could be slightly longer on her. The Cloisonne Jacket could be a size larger for Sucia. It's really not her style, though, so she thought she'd take a pass on it, even though she really liked the stitch pattern and the color combo. The swing coat on Sucia was nice and swingy, accentuating her height.
Audrey usually wears a size 12-14 top; she's 5' 2" tall.
Bust: 40½"
Waist: 38¾"
Hips: 45"
      
I love the swing coat on Audrey; she should make it right away! The Leyfi is a little too small though, and the sleeves are obviously too long. I don't think the neck is as flattering as it should be, either; maybe this just isn't the sweater for Audrey! (The color is great, though.) The Chiral cardi is wonderful on her, but I'm not sure about the color. Maybe in a green like the Leyfi. I think the Cloisonne just has too much going on at the bottom for Audrey. I'd like to see her in something that draws the eye up to her face. But in that same brown and blue combo, which is a wonderful color for Audrey's complexion.
Mellissa usually wears a size 10 top.
She's 5' 6" tall.
Bust: 41"
Waist: 35"
Hips: 38"
       That swing coat looks great on Melissa! It accentuates her busty yet slim frame perfectly! The Leyfi Pullover is great on her, too and I know she loved it when she saw it in the magazine. It's her color, and I think the size 36 is good on her. She could make the sleeves a bit shorter, but not much. I like Melissa in the simple stockinette Chiral, but I think the ruffle and ruching is too much for her bustiness. The color washes her out a bit, too—maybe this one is a pass for Melissa!
Jaime usually wears a size 4 top.
She's 5''6" tall.
Bust: 35"
Waist: 28"
Hips: 37"
      
Jaime is teeny tiny, and the 40-inch swing coat is just too big on her. The bold plaid overwhelms her little frame, too. The Chiral, however, is fantastic, and I love the whimsy that the ruffle adds to Jamie's outdoorsy style. The Cloisonne is pretty on Jaime, but I think it's too fussy for her style. The brown is beautiful on her, though. The Leyfi is a great sweater on Jaime, aside from the arms being too long. I think she could leave out a lace repeat on the sleeves to make them the right length. Love that green on her!
Dinah usually wears a size 10 top; she's
5' 11¾" tall.
Bust: 35½"
Waist: 32"
Hips: 41½" 
      
My favorites on Dinah are the Breacan Swing and the Cloissone Jacket. The Cloisonne is beautiful on her, and I think it fits her sense of style perfectly: classy. I love the colors on Dinah! The swing coat is fab, working well with her height, and the plaid is good—doesn't the swing coat look nice with black pants? I like the Chiral on Dinah, too, but I think it needs to be longer. She's got it pulled down to be the right length, but it loses some of the rouching; a little more length would restore just the right amount. The Leyfi has the same problem, it's too short for Dinah. The sleeves are the correct length, and the neck is good, but the body could use a good two or three more inches
Kathy usually wears a size 12 top. She's 5' 4" tall.
Bust: 38¾"
Waist: 33"
Hips: 40"
    

      
Kathy loved these two pieces and they loved her! My favorite on Kathy is the Leyfi. It fits her well and the neck is flattering. Those sleeves are too long, but that's an easy fix, right? The Cloisonne is beautiful on Kathy—those colors really look great. The sleeves could be a tad shorter, though, and I think a 42-inch bust would fit just right. The 38-inch sample cardi doesn't quite hang right in the front.
Patty usually wears a size 8 or 10 top.
She's 5' 4½" tall.
Bust: 36½"
Waist: 33"
Hips: 43½"
    
Patty rocked the cardigan look, didn't she?I especially love her in the Chiral cardi. The color, the fit, the length, everything works for Patty. The Cloisonne is great on her too; she liked the collar up, as did a couple of the other gallery gals. I really like it both ways—the more versatility the better, right? The sleeve length is perfect on Patty; I think she would need just one size up (to the 42") to get the front to close and hang properly. I do like the Breacan Swing on Patty, but I think it would be better in a more monochrome look like Eunny suggested in her sweater workshop on this piece. Maybe blues for Patty. And maybe a little shorter, too.

We now have two options for viewing the fall gallery. You can go here to find the sweaters grouped by model, or scroll down to find the sweaters grouped by pattern.

Here are the sweaters and how they looked on each of our gallery gals.

The Breacan Swing Coat
by Gwen Bortner
Sample sweater measures 40"

Yarn: Zitron Nimbus (held doubled)
Needles: Size 13 US
Gauge: 12 sts and 18 rows = 4" in Stockinette stitch

Sucia usually wears a size 8 top. She's 5' 9" tall.
Bust: 36"
Waist: 30"
Hips: 38"

The swing coat on Sucia was nice and swingy, accentuating her height.
Audrey usually wears a size 12-14 top; she's 5' 2" tall.
Bust: 40½"
Waist: 38¾"
Hips: 45"

I love the swing coat on Audrey; she should make it right away!

Mellissa usually wears a size 10 top.
She's 5' 6" tall.
Bust: 41"
Waist: 35"
Hips: 38"

That swing coat looks great on Melissa! It accentuates her busty yet slim frame perfectly!

Jaime usually wears a size 4 top.
She's 5''6" tall.
Bust: 35"
Waist: 28"
Hips: 37"


Jaime is teeny tiny, and the 40-inch swing coat is just too big on her. The bold plaid overwhelms her little frame, too.

Dinah usually wears a size 10 top; she's
5' 11¾" tall.
Bust: 35½"
Waist: 32"
Hips: 41½" 

The swing coat is fab, working well with her height, and the plaid is good—doesn't the swing coat look nice with black pants?

Patty usually wears a size 8 or 10 top.
She's 5' 4½" tall.
Bust: 36½"
Waist: 33"
Hips: 43½"

 I do like the Breacan Swing on Patty, but I think it would be better in a more monochrome look like Eunny suggested in her sweater workshop on this piece. Maybe blues for Patty. And maybe a little shorter, too.
The Chiral Cardigan
by Coralie Meslin
Sample sweater measures 36"

Yarn: Rowan Lima
Needles: Size 10 US
Gauge: 16 sts and 22 rows = 4" in Stockinette stitch

Sucia usually wears a size 8 top. She's 5' 9" tall.
Bust: 36"
Waist: 30"
Hips: 38"

The Chiral Cardigan also fits Sucia well, though I think it could be slightly longer on her.
Audrey usually wears a size 12-14 top; she's 5' 2" tall.
Bust: 40½"
Waist: 38¾"
Hips: 45"

The Chiral cardi is wonderful on her, but I'm not sure about the color. Maybe in a green like the Leyfi.
Mellissa usually wears a size 10 top.
She's 5' 6" tall.
Bust: 41"
Waist: 35"
Hips: 38"

 I like Melissa in the simple stockinette Chiral, but I think the ruffle and ruching is too much for her bustiness. The color washes her out a bit, too—maybe this one is a pass for Melissa!
Jaime usually wears a size 4 top.
She's 5''6" tall.
Bust: 35"
Waist: 28"
Hips: 37"


The Chiral, however, is fantastic, and I love the whimsy that the ruffle adds to Jamie's outdoorsy style
Dinah usually wears a size 10 top; she's
5' 11¾" tall.
Bust: 35½"
Waist: 32"
Hips: 41½" 

I like the Chiral on Dinah, too, but I think it needs to be longer. She's got it pulled down to be the right length, but it loses some of the rouching; a little more length would restore just the right amount.
Patty usually wears a size 8 or 10 top.
She's 5' 4½" tall.
Bust: 36½"
Waist: 33"
Hips: 43½"

Patty rocked the cardigan look, didn't she?I especially love her in the Chiral cardi. The color, the fit, the length, everything works for Patty.
The Cloisonne Jacket
by Deborah Helmke
Sample sweater measures 38"

Yarn: Berocco Ultra Alpaca
Needles: Sizes 6 and 7 US
Gauge: 18 sts and 18 rows = 4" in stranded st on larger needles; 18 sts and 22 rows = 4" in Stockinette st on smaller needles

Sucia usually wears a size 8 top. She's 5' 9" tall.
Bust: 36"
Waist: 30"
Hips: 38"

The Cloisonne Jacket could be a size larger for Sucia. It's really not her style, though, so she thought she'd take a pass on it, even though she really liked the stitch pattern and the color combo.
Audrey usually wears a size 12-14 top; she's 5' 2" tall.
Bust: 40½"
Waist: 38¾"
Hips: 45"

 I think the Cloisonne just has too much going on at the bottom for Audrey. I'd like to see her in something that draws the eye up to her face. But in that same brown and blue combo, which is a wonderful color for Audrey's complexion.
Jaime usually wears a size 4 top.
She's 5''6" tall.
Bust: 35"
Waist: 28"
Hips: 37"


The Cloisonne is pretty on Jaime, but I think it's too fussy for her style. The brown is beautiful on her, though.
Dinah usually wears a size 10 top; she's
5' 11¾" tall.
Bust: 35½"
Waist: 32"
Hips: 41½" 

My favorites on Dinah are the Breacan Swing and the Cloissone Jacket. The Cloisonne is beautiful on her, and I think it fits her sense of style perfectly: classy. I love the colors on Dinah!
Kathy usually wears a size 12 top. She's 5' 4" tall.
Bust: 38¾"
Waist: 33"
Hips: 40"

The Cloisonne is beautiful on Kathy—those colors really look great. The sleeves could be a tad shorter, though, and I think a 42-inch bust would fit just right. The 38-inch sample cardi doesn't quite hang right in the front.
Patty usually wears a size 8 or 10 top.
She's 5' 4½" tall.
Bust: 36½"
Waist: 33"
Hips: 43½"

The Cloisonne is great on her too; she liked the collar up, as did a couple of the other gallery gals. I really like it both ways—the more versatility the better, right? The sleeve length is perfect on Patty; I think she would need just one size up (to the 42") to get the front to close and hang properly.
The Leyfi Pullover
by Rosemary (Romi) Hill
Sample sweater measures 36"

Yarn: S. Charles Collezione Tinka;
Filatura di Crosa Superior (held together)
Needles: Size 10 US
Gauge: 14 sts and 22 rows = 4" in Stockinette stitch

Sucia usually wears a size 8 top. She's 5' 9" tall.
Bust: 36"
Waist: 30"
Hips: 38"

As usual, Sucia looks great in everything! The Leyfi is especially great on her with it's long sleeves that are exactly the right length for her. 
Audrey usually wears a size 12-14 top; she's 5' 2" tall.
Bust: 40½"
Waist: 38¾"
Hips: 45"

The Leyfi is a little too small though, and the sleeves are obviously too long. I don't think the neck is as flattering as it should be, either; maybe this just isn't the sweater for Audrey! (The color is great, though.) 
Mellissa usually wears a size 10 top.
She's 5' 6" tall.
Bust: 41"
Waist: 35"
Hips: 38"

 The Leyfi Pullover is great on her, too and I know she loved it when she saw it in the magazine. It's her color, and I think the size 36 is good on her. She could make the sleeves a bit shorter, but not much.
Jaime usually wears a size 4 top.
She's 5''6" tall.
Bust: 35"
Waist: 28"
Hips: 37"


 The Leyfi is a great sweater on Jaime, aside from the arms being too long. I think she could leave out a lace repeat on the sleeves to make them the right length. Love that green on her!
Dinah usually wears a size 10 top; she's
5' 11¾" tall.
Bust: 35½"
Waist: 32"
Hips: 41½" 

The Leyfi has the same problem, it's too short for Dinah. The sleeves are the correct length, and the neck is good, but the body could use a good two or three more inches.
Kathy usually wears a size 12 top. She's 5' 4" tall.
Bust: 38¾"
Waist: 33"
Hips: 40"

Kathy loved these two pieces and they loved her! My favorite on Kathy is the Leyfi. It fits her well and the neck is flattering. Those sleeves are too long, but that's an easy fix, right?
      

Other Things You May Like to Check Out:

Categories

Interweave Knits, Magazines
Kathleen Cubley

About Kathleen Cubley

Hello daily knitters! I'm the editor of Knitting Daily. I've been obsessed with knitting for about ten years now and my favorite projects are sweaters. I like the occasional smaller project, but there's nothing like yards of stockinette with a well-placed cable or a subtle stitch pattern here and there. I crochet a bit now and then—especially when I need to produce a baby blanket in time for the baby shower. I've been in publishing for 20 years and I'm finally exactly where I want to be: at the crossroads of knitting and communication. I live in Spokane, Washington and when I'm not knitting I enjoy gardening, snuggling with my dogs, swimming, reading, and playing in the snow in the winter. But, really, I'm pretty much always knitting!

129 thoughts on “Interweave Knits Fall 2010 Galleries

  1. Dear Kathleen,  Thank you for showing these sweaters on people with “real” figures.  I thought the Breacan Swing jacket style looked good on almost everyone.  Also the Leyfi looked good on most.  This is a great way to judge the style of these knitted items on different body types.  I totally enjoy the Knitting Daily posts. 

  2. I liked it better when the gallery went sweater by sweater. While I like your models, I am not interested in THEM, I am interested in the SWEATER.I didn’t like going back and forth to see how a sweater I liked looked on different body types.

    Please DO keep on doing galleries. It is a service no other knitting mag currently offers.

  3. Thanks, as always, for the galleries.  It is such a help in selecting patterns. But, could you go back to showing the photos by design rather than by person (or offer both)?  It was so much easier to view.

     

    Thanks again.

  4. Thanks very much to all the models for doing this!  Really liked the Leyfi–thought it was univerally falttering.  I agree, though, that this was more helpful when the photos were grouped by the sweater rather than by the “model.”  As nice as it is of these women to model these sweaters, their personal styles will not figure into the equation for the rest of us; we’re looking at body type, coloring and perhaps age approriateness.

  5. I enjoy the galleries, they’re very helpful. I find it annoying, however, to have the styles grouped by “model.” I much prefer the  older mode of presenting the pieces, grouped by “item.” It made for much easier and more comprehensive comparisons.

  6. I honestly like the sweaters organized by person – you can see how all the styles look on your body-type easier (but, I don’t usually knit for other people).

    I agree with DianneD, please offer both, since there seems to be want for either view type.

  7. I enjoyed the new format for the galleries.  I was able to find a model with a similar body-type to mine and focus on what styles looked best on her, rather than flipping through all of the sweaters looking for one particular model to see how each would probably fit me.  Thanks!

  8. I really appreciate seeing the sweaters on the various body types and your analysis. Some of us with the less-than-perfect figures struggle to figure out what style is going to look good with a rounder tummy or bigger bust than the women who are shown in the brochure have. In particular, I was wondering about the plaid coat – sure it looks great on skinny Minnie, everything looks good on her – but how about someone who’s shorter or taller or rounder.  That’s the thing with knitting: we don’t have the luxury of trying on the look to see how it will look on us until we put a lot of work into it. Thanks so much.

  9. Kathleen & Staff -I really LOVE to see these sweaters on REAL-LIFE people and REAL-LIFE photos!  My only criticism is that I’d like to see an additional person who isn’t a size 10 or smaller.  All of these women are listed as having a top size of 10 or smaller.  Can you find a lady to model who’s maybe a size 18 or 20?  Don’t get me wrong, I love what you’re doing here, but I’ve never seen a larger sized model and I’d love to see one or two to represent the rest of us.  I need to get an idea of what these will look like on me too.  Thank you for listening!

  10. Love the gallery!  It really gave me more insight to what might fit my body and my style.  I love the Cloissone (and I have lots of Ultra Alpaca in my stash–how great is that?).  Thanks.

  11. While I appreciate the sweaters shown on “real” people, don’t you have anyone in your office that’s larger than a size 12-14?  Still doesn’t help me visualize how they will look on me.

  12. THANK YOU for having some regular, non model bodies!  For me, Dinah’s tallness is a great welcome to the galleries. This is my favorite feature of these knitting dailys (dailies?) – Jen

  13. I agree that it would be nice to see a larger sized model 14-16 .  I think the idea of a swing jacket is nice , but I don’t think the large check pattern was flattering to anyone. The Chiral looked good on everyone- maybe just a color change for some.

  14. Love the different size models but how about adding some more size ranges too? Also, I like the commentary but it would be great to see the pattern redesigned for smaller/larger sizes and then photographed on the models.  Keep up the good work.

  15. Thank you to MaureenS@25     … it is not just me then that doesn’t think any of the garments are worth knitting.

    I think they are all horrible. Such a shame as I am sure a huge amount of effort went into them, but for me…. No way.!!

    and I agree, what about the larger ladies?. Forgotten as usual.

  16. Like a number of others who have commented, I’d prefer that you go sweater-by-sweater instead of model-by-model. And, while I do appreciate the analysis, the comments about what the women themselves did or didn’t like (e.g., “It’s not her style,”) weren’t helpful; in fact, they are confusing. It’s not relevant to us whether these particular people would or wouldn’t select the garment for themselves.  As another person pointed out, we’re interested in the sweaters, not the models. In some cases (such as the plaid jacket on Jaime), the model is posed in such a way that I cannot see whether the garment is flattering or not. (In that particular case, the commentary dismissed the garment as too overwhelming for the model, but it would be nice to judge for myself).

    That said, I really appreciate the galleries. And, though I’m more of a “skinny Minnie” type myself, I completely sympathize with those who would like to see the clothes modeled on some larger body types. Ideally, this would mean creating at least one additional sample size for each modeled garment, which I realize would be a significant undertaking. Otherwise, though, I think the main impression we’d get is that the garments are too tight and too small on the larger bodies. It would be ground breaking for Interweave to provide this service to its readers, though.

  17. I would also like to see the photos arranged by sweater. I would also like to see the finished garment dimensions and the model dimensions together so that I can see how much ease (positive or negative) each model has.  For example, the Chiral cardigan seemed to look best with very little ease.

    On Sucia the Leyfi sweater seems to pull along the lower portion of the lace across her chest. Does Sucia have broad shoulders? If not, perhaps she had the sweater on backwards?

  18. First, thanks for the galleries, it’s a wonderful feature to let us see how these look in real life.

    Second- I agree that showing them both by style and by model would be great.

    Third- I can’t believe that some of these sweaters fit these diverse body types as well as they did. Obviously they don’t fit everyone perfectly but they work much better than I would have thought.

    Fourth- having seen this, I agree with others that I now like some of the sweaters that I did not like much at first, because I’ve seen how they look on real people. I now like the Chiral in particular.

  19. what fun, I wish I could have been there.  It is so much more real to see each sweater on several different “real” people who are not trained as models.  Thank you.  We have a sit and knit on Thursday nights here in VT, and it is so much fun.  I know you were enjoying yourselves even if it was warm.  We always do.  Keep it up.  I love your updates, and save many.  Anne G, Six Loose Ladies yarn shop Proctorsville, VT.

  20. Thank you for the diverse models. The real people element is so helpful. I agree though, on grouping by sweater rather than model.

    I can see how certain styles better suit the different women. I find the comments that go along with the pictures helpful- as to why the different items do or do not work.

  21. Thanks so much for having all the gals model those sweaters!  It’s good to get a little idea as to how they look on different figures!  :)  Being a Tall, Large, and Pear-Shaped person makes fitting problematic!!!  Even trying to visualize which ones would look good when all is done!!!

    Thanks again!

    Barb

  22. Thank you to the ladies for posing in the sweaters- it looks like fun.  I agree with some of the other comments- I will give a couple of these sweaters a second look when I see how great they look!  Thanks!

  23. thanks, for the gallery.  I agree with the others about the gallery, keeping the models wearing the same sweater together.   It helped me decide exactly what size I should knit for myself. While in Florida vacationing, I had your magazine, visited the yarn shop , purchased yarn for the Cloisonne sweater but in different colors; and yes I purchased yarn for the larger size just in case. The shop owner loved the sweater so much she was going to look for her copy of the magazine and do one!

  24. I enjoyed the sweaters on real people. However, the downside was that I realize the sweaters will not look good on my size 48″ finished bust. That is my big complaint with most of the knitting magazines and I am gradually dropping my subscrptions and will just buy patterns. Most sweaters will not look good on someone of my size. I had my husband look at the sweaters to see if it was just me and he stated emphatically  that the sweaters were not flattering on anyone but the size 4. Since I do not think most women in  America are a size 4 magazines need more patterns that are truly flattering and stylish for larger women.

    Sincerely,

    Joyce

  25. I just want to leave a positive comment in hopes that it will cancel out at least one of the negative (and sometimes downright ugly) comments that have already been left. (And I’m not talking to those who politely made suggestions or offered your preference for the format – that info can be helpful feedback – but to those who seem mightily ungrateful because the information wasn’t presented exactly the way they would prefer.)

    I simply adore that Knitting Daily offers these galleries and want to say a HUGE thank you to Kathleen and all the models! I’m very appreciative of the work that goes into these galleries and the information that is made available! I might not like every sweater and every sentence of every commentary might not be relevant to me, but I for one realize that it’s not all about me and others may love what’s not my taste and be greatly helped by comments I’m able to overlook. Keep up the great work and keep your chin up, even as you endure the negativity because there are lots of us enjoying these features and appreciating them!!

  26. I love the Gallery.  My only comment – please find a model who is not a size 10.  When the sweaters are sized for larger sizes it is important to show someone who wears a 16 or larger.

     

  27. I’m not so bothered by whether you go by model or by sweater like some people.

    I do, however, find that I generally disagree with your comments. Of course, some things are subjective and a matter of taste, but to say the Leyfi looks good on anyone who isn’t sylphlike is to ignore the fact that raglan shoulders and any kind of close-fitting neckline do not suit a large number of women and anyone who has a fuller figure or is over 35 and inclined to a less-than-firm chinline. (This appears to be something I encounter much more often with American women than in Europe!) A woman of under 5’6″ is hardly going to look good in a plaid the size of the swing jacket and the bulk of it is also not suited to anyone with any weight at all… especially those heavy cuffs, though the open neckline is bound to suit most women because it shows off the face and neck. Neither did I agree about the cloisonné jacket on some of your models – I think it looked best on most women, both style and colour are very flattering. The turquoise suits almost any colouring and the shape is bound to suit many figures, plus the sleeve length shows off the slimmest part of a woman, the wrists… As for the chiral cardigan, it is ok on the young trendy figures but on everyone else it looks like the knitter got the two front halves wrong and the model then buttoned it up wrong, I cannot see how it can look anything other than frumpy and “handknit”. 

    So the cloisonné is the only one of these I would consider making, and I’d probably stick to the colours (although I could imagine lots of nice combinations) and mirror the vine chart.

  28. Hi Kathleen, I really like this format because I can see how each one looks on a particular body style, and I love that you gave the height and measurements – models, how nice of you! – so the groupings worked well for my mindset!  This obviously took lots of time and effort.  I know the current trend is to want everything we see to be instantly available in any way we want it – but I am just pleased to be able to view these on realistic body styles so I can get an idea of what my end result will be for me – thank you sincerely!

  29. Thanks for the gallery, as usual. It does help to see these on a variety of people.  Frankly when I got the magazine I did not like any of these. Now I see that all work well on at least one of the gals.  I think the tip about making the Cloisonne with more closely related color is also excellent–and probably would have made a much more favorable display in the magazine. Oh I also prefer the sweater by sweater style in the gallery. Anyway, thanks and I enjoyed the gallery.  

  30. I also want to add my thanks for having the galleries.  With Christmas on the horizon, this has really helped me decide which sweaters to make as gifts.  I struggle trying to decide on pieces for friends and family with body types other than my own and don’t want to ruin the Christmas surprise by taking detailed measurements.  Now that I can see what needs to be lengthened/shortened on various heights and widths, I feel much more secure that I won’t have to deal with the awkwardness of a response to “gee, this sweater that took you months to make is lovely.  If only the torso was longer…”

  31. I agree that seeing the garments grouped by pattern rather than by model is a better format.  But I would like to see a whole lot more patterns knittend from the top down.  Fitting is ever so much simpler if you can just try it on as you go and make adjustments as you go.  Knitting piece by piece and sewing together just seems counterintuitive to me.  That’s what a sewing machine and woven fabrics are for.  I’ve been knitting from the top down for a while now and find it is much much easier and because there are so very few patterns made that way, I must adapt everything.  But it’s worth it because if something is wrong with the fit, you find it out right away and not when the garment is finished.

  32. I want to register total support for the entry written by dryad23

    Also, grouping by model is ideal for anyone wanting to knit for a particular person – themselves, or a friend or relative. This way helps me to see that no, after all I should not be drawn to the sweater I was attracted by (worn by a “real” model, rather than a “real life” model!) – but what a surprise, there is another pattern in the magazine that will look just right (or more than one, for that matter).

     

    Thank you so much for the Galleries.

    PS – I am puzzled by a few of the complaints. Audrey and Kathy don’t wear size 10 tops! And the sample tops everyone is modelling presumably arrived at set sizes for the magazine photographic shoots. If you do have people size 16 and over available and willing to model, the smaller sized samples would NOT look good on them, so it would be daft – but the magazine offers patterns for all kinds of sizes. Size 16 and over readers could offer to knit a large sample for the gallery ahead of time – and make the yarn purchase etc etc; I cannot help but feel this would be an enormous amount of work on top of the enormous amount of work you put in to offer what you can.

    Maybe someone on staff who has an ampler figure, and who is experienced in knitting for herself, could write a note to explain what she might choose to do with each pattern with her physical features in mind – to flatter the best features and minimise what she’d prefer not to draw attention to (including saying that she wouldn’t dream of trying certain patterns, with her particular figure).Mind you, she too would probably be criticised, for her taste and preferences! Ah well …

     

    For myself, I send huge and warm personal thanks to Audrey and Kathy, just because I am sort of their size and shape, and need to knit for myself this winter!

  33. Please give a big thank you to these gals for modeling these for this venue.

     

    The only feedback I would like to give is there is no image of Melissa wearing the cloisonne jacket, nor a reason.  Was it just not right for her figure?  I would like to know because we closely match each other in measurements.

  34. Kathleen I would like to thank you and all the ladies for the excellent work you did modeling these 4 sweaters. Seeing them on real live non-model ladies makes my knitting choices much easier.

    I would like to vote to have all the same sweaters grouped together as it makes it easier to go to just the sweaters that appealed to me and not wade through the rest. Also as the poses for each sweater were different I would get a clearer idea of how the sweater fit at the bust, hips, neck and the sleeve length. Also having to remember the name of each sweater in the commentary was difficult and I had to keep scrolling up to the top of the page to see what sweater had what name.

    I would also like to vote for a larger size sweater model.

    I really enjoy these “real figure” model galleries and the Knitting Daily posts.

    Linda in Santa Rosa, CA

     

  35. Although I always look at this feature, I sort of don’t get it. There’s only one size of each sweater, right? Then different-size women put it on and predictably, it looks good on the people for whom it’s the right size and not so good on the people for whom it’s too small, too short, too long in the sleeves and so on. To make this feature really work for readers, you’d have to make multiple samples in different sizes — not custom-made for these individuals, but a range of sizes — and let the models try on a size that most nearly fits them. That’s when the comments about tweaking the pattern would make more sense to the reader, because you’d be talking about choosing a reasonable size, then adding or subtracting length at the bottom or in the sleeves or whatever would look better on that person. I also agree about needing to add a plus-size model for patterns that have some plus-size directions — but don’t just give her the average-size sample and say it’s too small for her!

  36. Please ask Kathy to pose for you again – she is exactly my size and height, and I bet we are almost the same age too!

    Fantastic not to have to use my limited imagination to decide what to make!

    Thanks Kathy, for taking the trouble. You’re looking particularly fantastic in the Leyfi.

    This Gallery feature is the best idea ever. Please keep it.

  37. Thanks for sharing the galleries.  I would like to see them sorted by sweater rather than model, but it still helps me see how these sweaters would work.

    I am confused, however, about the Leyfi sweater’s fit on Sucia.  She has the bust measurement that matches the sweater, yet there is a pull across the front of the sweater that indicates perhaps it doesn’t fit.  That doesn’t make sense to me as it seems to fit all other models.  Is there a reason the sweater is pulling the way it is?

    Thanks again for the galleries.  I know some projects in the magazine don’t initially capture my attention and the galleries help me see them in a new light; the same is true of some projects I think I like but find them less appealing in the galleries.  It’s why you do it, right? 

  38. I’d just like to echo the request for a plus size model. If there is a plus size option on the pattern it would be really helpful to see how it looks and hangs at a larger size.

  39. Dear Kathleen, words cannot express my delight at seeing the sweaters on different body types.  All of whom are REAL people.  I love”Knitting Daily” and can’t wait to logon to see what awaits me.  Knitting feels much more user friendly now, and crocheting now makes sense; apparently it really does matter what hole you put your hook in.  The galleries are gorgeous.

     

  40. I think Dinah is the only one who looks good in the cardigan – everybody else looks like they got it from a charity shop after it had been washed a hundred times. I think the cloisonne jacket is a terrible design and I would not give it house room (I certainly would not waste yarn on it).

    Not a good selection. The only half-decent top is the plaid jacket – shame about the terrible neckline.

    All in all? Pretty disappointing.

  41. Thank you for how completely you cover each sweater! Personally I don’t think the ruffle and rouching on the one sweater flatters ANY of the models – it looks more like a mistake, with the bunching/pulling created at each button (sorry if this is a negative comment). Would like to see a model that more fits the size 18-20 area (you know – a bit more busty/heavy…like me?) Thank you, again, for the photos and variety of each one of the sweaters & models. It’s very nice to see such complete coverage for us!

  42. Of course I love the galleries – mega-thanks to you and the models for doing this!

    I, too, would like to see larger sizes modeled, but I realize that the samples always come in size miniscule and smaller! Please, please, please, please urge designers to create LARGE size samples, so that we average & larger women can form more accurate judgements. Sorry, slender folk: given that 60% of Americans are now considered obese, “average” is now size 16!

    Meanwhile … I like the style of the Breccan coat, but the plaid is hideous. Eunny’s suggestion to do it in monochromes is helpful, but still, plaid just doesn’t work for me, particularly a humongous plaid like this. I think I’d lose the plaid and just do the style in something tweedy, maybe even with a boucle at the collar to imitate persian lamb.

     The Cloisonne is … okay … but I loathe the brown & turquoise together. I am SOOOO ready for that color trend to be over, as well as the let’s-emphasize-my-round-belly by fastening at the top & open/cutaway the rest of the way. mmmm, yeah, ugly color combo and unflattering line, gotta love it.  ‘Fraid not.

    Leyfi is only so-so as well. I look lousy in raglans; they make me look like I have a teensy head and emphasize that belly. The neckline ain’t great on anyone with a heavy or short neck. That said, I do like the leaf pattern at the yoke and down the sleeves, so I might just plug it into a more flattering, basic look out of (here’s a word from our sponsor!) The Knitter’s Handy Book of Sweater Patterns.

    I very much like the look of the Chiral. But … Audrey, who most resembles my body type, doesn’t look all that wonderful in it. Partly that’s the color, which is not good for her, but great for me. :-) But mostly it’s that the ruching on her, instead of looking delicate and feminine, looks more like the sweater doesn’t fit and is pulled across her abdomen. I dunno … maybe tweaking the fit with positive ease would work. That’s one where I’d sew a mock-up in cheap-*&% jersey.

    Unlike another commenter, I’m very pleased with the majority of the patterns in this issue. There’s plenty of panache, even a little edginess, without going over the line into downright weird (i.e., “why would anyone want to waste their time making something that looks this awful?” which is my summertime knitting lament). There are several that I’m probably going to add to my verrrrrry-long queue.

  43. I would like to express my thanks for actually having a model with my measurements this time around. Though I can’t help but looking at Jaime who is my height and nearly the exact same measurements I am, aside from my being a bit bustier, and think there is no way I could possibly be that tiny! I swear, I’m not. This helps a lot though in determining which sizes I would want to knit and what I think would look best on me.

     

    I am going to echo those who actually like seeing them grouped by model, and think that it could probbly be served by having the pictures grouped both ways.

  44. Thank you so much for these galleries.  I was only disappointed to find that the plaid jacket didn’t really look good on anyone, and I really liked that one in the magazine. Your model that is closest to me is Melissa and reinforced my opinion that the Leifi sweater is really the best one for me.  I truly love that design.   Thanks again for a great gallery.

  45. Thank you – this is a great feature showing these sweaters on all the different sized women.  It sure helps in making a decision on which to knit for yourself or a friend or family member.  I hope on Monday (Sept, 13th), we find one or more of these sweaters as a selection in the next KAL.

  46. LOve the galleries but agree with earlier comment would rather see one sweater at a time and on different figures, confusing to have to scroll up and down to see the differences….

    as always GREAT to see the sweaters on real people ! THanks for doing it.

  47. I think it is very fun to see these sweaters on live models, it is better than a catalog because you can judge for yourself whether a style would work for you or not. This concept is helpful because when you look at catalogs they are always modeled by well, models!

  48. To the models: thank you ladies for showing us the fit on real people!

    I loved this collection of sweaters and actually like the new format. You can pick the person most like yourself and see all the sweaters on her. I much preferthis to the other view.

    As far as the style comments go, I think they’re pretty spot on except as someone else mentioned, any lady with a heavier upper body and less than clear jawline (speaking from personal experience here) really isn’t flattered by a style up to the chin, it needs a bit of openness around the decolletage. In the really cold weather a matching scarf is a great option to cover up outdoors, rather than a high neck.

     

  49. Another vote for getting the items grouped together by item rather than by model. I can’t keep track of what the sweaters were called and ended up having to scroll up to see which one you were talking about. Also having them grouped together by item helps me compare them on different bodies in one go.

  50. O truly appreciate the ‘real models’ grouped by body type/size. I would be very interested in seeing a model with a 42″ bust and larger because those are sizes I make for gifting. Thank everyone who put this new gallery together, it is wonderful.

  51. Perhaps you could add an option where a particular style could come up in a overlay window showing how it looked on all of the models!  I can see advantages to doing it both ways. Love, love, love the galleries!

  52. I find it interesting that many of the commerters do not seem to realize that these are the EXACT same sweaters that are pictured on the model in the magazine, and are all size 34 or 36. Perhaps this should be stated at the beginning of the galleries post? None of the sweaters have been re-knit in a larger size to suit the gallery models, and it would be rather embarrassing to try and fit someone size 16+ into one of them IMO.  I do however agree that Interweave could use a larger model or two in the magazine, and that would require a larger sample size, so we could see some larger women in the galleries wearing the larger sweater.

    Perhaps Interweave could do a Special Issue, like the “Weekend” issue, with patterns and models of sweaters for bigger people?

  53. This is the first time since I joined that I have seen the gallery and it is a fantastic idea. I rwally enjoyed seeing each jumper or cardigan on different body types. My only problem is that because I live in Australia (Tasmania) I have to keep getting my tape measure out to work out the sizes (inches to centimetres) and we also have different dress sizes here.  Thank you very much for displaying all your hard work.

  54. Thank you for these different views.  While I’m smaller, I totally sympathize with those who want views on larger frames; but please, oh please do not do away with the smaller frames when adding these others.  Also, it would be fun to see some other colorways on the same style for those of us who don’t like the magazine’s version.  I think these would also open our eyes to the potential for different styles we might not have considered.

  55. thanks for showing the sweaters on “real” women! i plan to make the chirla but will tweak it a but. 3/4 sleeves with a little ruffle on the cuff. already have my deep purple yarn and looking forward to it.

    kathleen, thanks for making kd so much fun!

  56. fantastic gallery,  it helps me immensely to see the different size shapes and sizes so I can vision what I would look like in those styles.  Thank you gals for doing this and making it easier for us.   Keep those galleries coming.

  57. Great gallery.  I like the format of showing all styles on one model at a time — well done.    I thought the Chiral was overall the most flattering on every model.  I am not a fan of 3/4 or elbow length sleeves on sweaters, so to me the Cloisonne would need to have wrist-lenght sleeves to be perfect.  The opposite is true of the Leyfi.  It’s a beautiful sweater with really attractive sleeve detail — but too often the sleeves were too long to be wearable.  But as you point out, it’s an easy fix.

  58. Thank You for having all sizes of models. I most  resemble Jaime in size but shorter and would love to know what size sweater she usually knits. I seem to make my sweaters a size too big and yet afraid to go down a size when the next sweater project comes along.

    I love it when you do these galleries! What sizes are the sweaters that the models tried on?

  59. It’s really great to see real people as models! However, as others have said, I’d like to see more plus sized models.

    I also agree with Cattina. It seems quite silly to put someone in the wrong sized sweater and then comment that she should wear it in a different size. That isn’t helpful at all to us, not to mention that showing people in ill-fitting sweaters seems like poor marketing strategy.  

    Having more than one of each sweater seems like a good solution. It wouldn’t hurt if they were different colors, too. That way you could show a greater range of sizes and the models wouldn’t have to model something that so obviously doesn’t fit right or look good.

    [And to those of you who have written as if it’s a great hardship to make any more than one sweater, I say that getting the yarn, likely at a discount, and the people to knit a few extra sweaters doesn’t seem cruel and unusual for people from the land of KNITTING DAILY.]

  60. I think the Leyfi looked great on everybody! and though I do like seeing how the sweaters fit on different bodies, I’m gonna say this again though on a gallery thread- the Interweave models in the magazine are great. It gives handknits a true “young” and fashionable feel in a magazine spread. I personally never would have picked up Interweave if it didn’t look young and stylish…

  61. What a beautiful job you have done here. Your gallery is magnificent. So many options to look at. This really does give so many of us a great perspective.  Everyone’s comments are so helpful.  Well, almost everyone.  My Momma use to always say, if you don’t have something nice to say, say nothing at all.  Almost everyone with a complaint had a suggestion for a solution. If you just want to complain, perhaps another site would be more to your taste.  We are all out here just trying to enjoy our lives and our art. If you are not enjoying it, please spare the rest of us the details. And thank you Knitting Daily for giving so much to all of us.

  62. Wow!  Really impressed with the Cloisonne jacket and the Leyfi pullover.  Had it not been for this gallery presentation and comparison of body styles, I would never have thought of knitting either one of these for myself…would not have thought they were my style, BUT, these two designs look good on every one of your “models”! 

     I do think it might be easier to view this gallery if all photos of a single design were grouped together.  That said, I think these galleries are wonderful; no one else offers this valuable  “in real life” point of view.

  63. I really like the idea of offering viewers a choice, by sweater or by model, though I have to say I liked it by model.  And THANK YOU for adding Jamie–she’s just my size!  

  64. I love the galleries!  They are my favorite part of Knitting Daily, especially since it seems to have moved away from more technical knitting articles.  Thanks also to the models–wonderful of you to let us see these sweaters on a variety of body sizes and styles in order to see what changes we might want to make in the sweaters on our own non-standard model bodies :-)

    That said, it does seem that there is some confusion among the readers about the fact that all of the photos are the same four sample sweaters as seen in the magazine on different people.  My personal preference is to see the photos grouped by sweater rather than model.  I am lucky, I guess because I am roughly the same size as the models so the information given by the photos and Kathleens alteration suggestions are helpful in assisting me to have ideas about how I could make the individual sweaters fit my body better.  I think it would be great if somehow if a larger sample size could be produced for those in the larger size ranges.  The person that said about 60 percent of the population is now larger was correct and based on the number of requests here it seems that the subscribers would like it.  Perhaps a gallery could be done at the end of a KAL, with photos of all of the different sweaters, alterations and colorways?  That would not be as timely as doing the gallery of sweaters from the new issue, but it would be interesting.

    Finally about the sweaters this time, I wasn’t impressed by the pictures of the sweaters in the preview post and the gallery did not help much.  In particular, I don’t think the Leyfi or the Breccan Swing looks good on anyone.  I am surprised that I liked the Cloisonne better after seeing this, but I would be tempted to do away with the turquoise lace bit at the bottom and the ends of the sleeves, just a little too fussy.  However, I am already knitting two brown items and have too little time to add another to my line-up. 

    Thanks again!

  65. For those of us who are larger sizes (including me!). My understanding is that these sweaters are the samples available. Could you tell how something will look on you, if a size 16-18 person were modelling a sweater made for a size 10-12 person? I think we need to look at the model with proportions similar to us, then use our imaginations, using suggestions given, like the comments about sleeve length, patterns emphasizing least flattering or more flattering features, etc.

    Love the galleries in both formats. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Both are a lot better than finishing a garment that you thought would look fantastic and finding out you look frumpy in it after all that work. And so much better than shopping all overseveral towns trying on a million garments, and being discouraged because nothing ready-made seems to fit or look right!

  66. I haven’t even thought of making anything other than accessories (hats, scarves, shawls) for myself since I have become a QUITE full-figured woman, but this gallery is making me consider it. I saw the Breacan Jacket in the magazine but didn’t pay a bit of attention to it. I love it in this gallery, but I am thinking a totally different color palette. I, too, would like to see a size 20-22 model. 

  67. The galleries are great! I like seeing the sweaters “by person”. That way I can see how each sweater looks on a particular body type. The hardest part about picking a size to make is figuring out the amount of ease makes the sweater look the best.

  68. I really like the sweaters by person b/c I could pick the model whose shape is closest to mine. When choosing something to knit, I start with my shape, not the sweater I like. I used to do it the other way round but was disappointed too many times.

    I love these galleries, thanks to everyone involved!

  69. “I think you look great, all of you!” I love the colours especially of the jumpers….it is so refreshing to see normal, people showing their knitted wear…well done.  Helen from Tasmania, Australia.

  70. I really like it when you guys do these because I can find the model that is closest in size/shape to me and really see how a sweater is going to fit.  Sometimes I’m not quite sure how much ease I need, should I even dare to have a little negative ease? (I really liked it when you guys included how much ease either way each model had). 

  71. Thanks for keeping these galleries going!   They are fantastically useful in seeing how a particular garment may look on you or someone you are thinking of making it for.  My gratitude to the models, Kathleen and Knitting Daily!

    With that in mind I actually found it very useful to go to the model whose body type was most like the intended person to see what suited best, rather than perusing a favorite garment.   It made me do a more honest appraisal and changed my preference.  The Leyfi is my favorite!  

  72. All of these are gorgeous…but I would love to see something on a petite sized lady….I’m 5’3″ and wear a 2-4….It’s so hard to think about downsizing bigger patterns….even the 36 inch will be large and there’s no way I’d want to tackle making that smaller w/ all the pattern going on.  I know us little gals may be the minority…but we still like to knit!!

  73. One of my pet peeves is amply illustrated on both the professional models and a few of  the gallery models — and in fashion pictures and on people everywhere.   To have a shirttail hanging below the sweater looks so extremely sloppy and poorly put together!!!  Let’s fight for the neater look of having these shirttails tucked in or shorter than the sweater!

    I agree with many of the comments so far that the gallery is more effective with the sweaters grouped together than in the arrangement this time.

    Gerry

  74. Happy to see the galleries again, and thank you, ladies, for modeling and letting us know your sizes! It’s really fascinating to see how something looks on women of similar sizes but different shapes. (‘course, I’d love to see a wider range of sizes, but I realize that they only make 1 sample, and it’ll only accomodate so much different sizing. Though that might be a good reason to get the occasional plus-sized model in the magazine!)

  75. It’s so helpful to see these sweaters on real people; I don’t like the way the Leyfi bunches at the neck, the Chiral looks good on all, something about the vertical ruffle. Thank you!

  76. Thank you for the new gallery.  I like how you displayed the sweaters by the model.  That way I could find the model that most closely matches my body type and see all sweaters at once.  Love them all.

  77. Thanks so much! What a great roup of generous and courageous women to put themselves out there for all of us to see and benefit from. So appreciated!

    I want to echo the sentiments of those calling for positivity here- no one’s interested in hearing complaints. If you don’t like what you see, why waste your time commenting- you just bring everyone else down.  Constructive criticism is great though.

    I look forward to the galleries after every issue- it is really interesting to me to hear the ideas for modification and see the way the different design details play out on different shapes- even if it doesn’t apply to me personally, it helps me understand knitwear design and how to critically appraise patterns I’m considering for myself. Thank you, a thousand times!

  78. I love seeing the patterns on real women!  It just makes it so easy to see whether a pattern you love on the model would actually look good on me!

    This is a fantastic section – many thanks.

  79. Kathleen,  I agree w/Ruth Ann about seeing the garments on people with “real” figures, and reading your comments about what works and what doesn’t.  Also, your suggestions were helpful about how to make changes so that the “doesn’t work” could become “does work”.  Thanks for really helpful insights, and thanks, also to your models.  They were great. 

  80. Just want to say a thank you to the lovely models, because what they are doing is so helpful for us. I don’t think I’ll knit any of these. Well, maybe the Cloissone. I like the Chiral but I think I’m too busty for it. Patty looks fantastic in it, color and everything.

  81. Thanks for showing the sweaters on real women! It helps so much to view the designs on different body types.

    I agree with some of the other posts that it would be better to group the photos of same sweaters together – less scrolling back and forth. 

    Thanks for putting this display together!

  82. Thanks for the real people (and their measurements) so that we can see how these sweaters really look.  It is often hard to decide when looking at the magazine as the models are never anywhere near my size.

  83. Having read all the comments thus far, one observation I would like to add is this:  Seeing the same garments on all the different women has shown me that I worry overmuch about fit. Having gained weight as the decades have passed, I fuss about measuring and swatching and calculating to prevent any possibility of my sweater looking too tight. These samples manage to mostly look good on everyone, minus the unavoidable stretching when they are obviously too small. These galleries are great for showing the adaptability of things knitted and help me see that I can wear a closer fit than I was allowing myself. Many thanks.

  84. Dinah should totally get to take home that Cloisonne Jacket, it looks like it was meant for her!

    I agree with those who say that heavy, bulky sweaters really flatter almost no one.  I realize that the trend today is for stuff that doesn’t take long to make, but you get out of something what you put into it, and lighter gauge sweaters are more flattering on a wider range of people.  I am not a large person and something like Leyfi would make me look totally tubular!

    I also understand the comments about having a variety of sizes of model, but in fact the sweaters being tried on are the ones knit for the magazine photo shoot so they can only be tried on people who will remotely fit into them.  IK doesn’t go off and get more knitted in different sizes for the gallery.

  85. I love the way you show the sweaters on people of varying sizes!  Thank you!  I knit for a wide variety and these photos really help me picture MY people in these garments!

  86. Thanks for all the time and effort put into creating the galleries.  It is so helpful to see the patterns on various sized figures and I like having them grouped by model instead of by pattern.   I can more easily focus on the model that is closest to the size I am knitting for.  It would be helpful to me if you might be able add a torso measurement (back of neck to waist).  For example, I am a short person (5′ 2″) but my shortness is mostly in my legs (arms) and not as much in my torso.  I sometimes need to shorten sweater lengths and always need to shorten sleeve length.  So even though I’m shorter than most models in the galleries, I might be fairly close to some of them in torso length.

     

  87. Why are the galleries arranged by model and not garment? “so you can see what all of the sweaters look like on each gallery gal.”The focus should be on the knits, not on whose shape and size happens to be closest to the samples’. We can see what they look like on each woman fine – in fact, better, for comparison’s sake – when categorized the old way, so here’s another vote to revert please. Thank you.

  88. Interweave Knit is a terrific site and the books are great too.  Finally found the magazine at an Indigo book store in Saint John, N.B. Canada, about a 6 hour drive from where I live in Cape Breton.  Once I figure out what yarn I can substitute  to knit the Breacan Swing it will be on my needles.  I don’t have access to the yarn called for.  Thanks for showing the sweater on different body types, it looks great on everyone.

  89. Enjoy the updated layout of the fall gallery, now you can view the sweaters by model or by sweater design. I hope you all find as much inspiration in these galleries as I do!

  90. I agree with all the others! It is very helpful to see the sweaters on several different models!  Really helps decide what to make and for whom! Definitely keep  this feature.

  91. The Leyfi bunches across the neck on both of the tallest models (Sucia and Dinah), as was pointed out by others, and should have been noted by the editors, for the sake of credibility if nothing else.  I think adjusting the yoke motif to be longer and wider would help it fit their taller frames.  SInce these models were the only ones who had good fit in the arms, I would venture to say the design should just be edited to call for shorter sleeves all around, with a note to taller than average people to consider adjusting them (and the yoke) longer.

    The photo of Melissa in the Leyfi is cute but really makes it hard to assess fit comparatively because there’s no view of the front.

    I am heavier and larger in the bust than any of the models, and would love to see someone my size (14 bottom – 16 top, 5’5 1/2″) in the mix.

  92. Thank you for these galleries!  I think they add a lot of information about how the sweaters look on different shaped women.  I disagree with those who gripe that the sizes should be PLUS sized or size nothing.  I don’t think you should have to cater to every extreme.  I was looking at the sizes of the sample garments used in this gallery- they are actually pretty midrange sized.  I suspect they had to be pinned and tucked in order to fit the magazine models.  SO… that brings me to my suggestion- put models with actual shape IN THE MAGAZINE.  I appreciate that the models in IK are not the anorexic adolescents that appear in high fashion mags, but since these garments are not meant for us to LOOK AT they are meant for us to MAKE AND WEAR, why not put models in the magazine that are, say, Mellissa’s size?  The garments all looked good on her.  Yes, get someone who is an experienced model who can give you the look you want, but size-wise I think that would be a GREAT help.  I know I could work upward OR downward from that size and shape quite easily.  Making a garment LESS shapely is much easier than trying to make it more shapely.  Visualizing what a garment will look like in a much larger size is far easier when looking at  a MIDRANGE size than it is when looking at a flat chested, skinny model.  FWIW, I live in the midwest and do not personally know a grown woman (say 25+) who is less than a size 10.  I do not know a single grown woman who has a barely visible bust (as is often the case with the magazine models). Maybe that is a Midwest thing?  I appreciate the galleries and that does somewhat make up for the magazine models, but why not just do it right in the first place??

    I knit for 3 sizes- microscopic pixie teen, tall very busty young woman and busty size 14.  I’m sorry but I have no pity for the teeny tinies who gripe that nothing comes in a size 32.  I knit most everything for my tiny pixie right out of the magazine with minor and very simple adjustments.  When I knit for my busty but slim daughter or my very average, not plus sized self, it is FAR FAR more complicated and far more difficult to know ahead of time what the garment is going to look like.

  93. Thanks so much, lovely ladies.  Such a great idea–I feel much more confident starting a project knowing how it will look on someone my size and height when it is done.

  94. What a fantastic idea – patterns being modeled by women with normal body sizes!  And boobs!  Now I have a much better idea of how a sweater will look on me.  Keep up the great work!

  95. Thanks – very helpful.  And, in the magazines, why not list the models measurements and the size that was knitted.  One without the other is pointless.  Also noting the models arm and torso length would be helpful.  As a curvy, though not busty 5’10”, I’m fairly sure the circumferences will be ok, but the sleeve length, waist placement (I prefer shaped garments) and armhole length are more critical to me.

    I’ve yet to make a sweater I won’t wear, but there are some I wish I had made longer in the torso and others I wish I hadn’t altered to be quite so scoop necked.

    Thanks for your consideration!

  96. What a great idea. It reall helped me to see the different body shapes and how garments looked. I am 5’2″ with a 43 bust and a size 8-10 bottom, so everything has to be measured and adjusted for my “girls” up top. My waist is not tiny either but I have a very flat bottom. I am long torso and very short legs.  A real combo of both parents, short Mom, tall Dad with long torso. Learning how to fit properly is the key to wearing your knitting. I am just learning the keys to that and loved this info.

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