IWK Spring 2008 Flutter Sleeve Cardigan

Feb 14, 2008
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Gallery: Flutter Sleeve Cardigan, design by Pam Allen

Interweave Knits Spring 2008As you can see, the same sweater looks very different on different women! We give general suggestions for customization for your inspiration. Only you can choose how you want your sweaters to fit and which customizations will work best for you and your beautiful self!

Flutter Sleeve Cardigan

Sample garment shown is 36" at bust.
General comments on the Flutter Sleeve Cardigan




Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Sarah
Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Kerry

Sarah

Her bust: 35.5"
Ease at bust as shown: 0.5" (zero to minimal ease)

For Sarah, I would keep the waist shaping on as written, but I might (might!) work fewer ribbing rows after the shaping was completed, and compensate by working more stockinette rows over the bust area. This would help the ribbing to end sooner, just under her bustline, thus giving more definition to her shape. It would also give more stockinette fabric to stretch over her curves up top. The reason I say "might" is that the sweater looks wonderful on Sarah as is.


Kerry

Her bust: 37.75"
Ease at bust as shown: 1.75" negative ease

For Kerry, who has a very high waist, I would start the ribbing about 1" sooner than written, so that the beginning of the ribbing corresponds to her natural waistline. I'd leave the shaping in the ribbed section just as written—this would move the entire ribbed section down, thus giving more definition to her bustline. Again, I would have to work more stockinette rows on top to achieve the proper fit over the bust.




Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Debbie
Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Toni

Debbie

Her bust: 34.5"
Ease as shown: 1.5" positive ease

Debbie is wearing the Flutter with the same amount of ease as recommended in the magazine. Her natural waist is a bit lower than the beginning of the ribbing, so I would start the ribbing about 1" sooner. However, her waist is long, and I like where the bust shaping falls as it is on her, so I might work an additional 1" of ribbing before the stockinette section. In other words: lower the beginning of the ribbing, but leave the top where it is, making the whole section longer. Adding another inch or two to the hem length would help balance out the long waist.


Toni

Her bust: 33.5"
Ease as shown: 2.5" positive ease

The extra positive ease helps the sweater fit over Toni's long sleeve layers. I'd make the sweater a bit longer for her. Other than that: Completely adorable.




Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Annie
Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Trish

Annie

Her bust: 31"
Ease as shown: 5" positive ease


Trish

Her bust: 34"
Ease as shown: 2" positive ease




Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Laura
Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Bertha

Laura

Her bust: 33.5"
Ease as shown: 2.5" positive ease


Bertha

Her bust: 34"
Ease as shown: 2" positive ease




Knitting Gallery - Flutter Sleeve Cardigan Bertha Back

Bertha - Back

Her bust: 34"
Ease as shown: 2" positive ease

Sandi's general comments on the Flutter: First of all: I love it! Knit at 5 sts to the inch, there is a lot of "give" and stretch to the fabric of this sweater. The cotton/silk/nylon blend yarn, however, has quite a bit of memory, so the sweater does not get stretched out of shape! It gracefully fit everyone from Kerry, on whom it has 2" of negative ease, to Annie, where it had 5" of positive ease. More positive ease means that you can wear it as a cardigan, over other clothes (see Toni's photo); negative ease gives it a more fitted look, like a suit jacket, allowing you to wear it alone, or with a tank or sleeveless blouse.

The wide waist ribbing gives this sweater a long-waisted shape, which is quite slimming on many larger gals. Because Pam used a clever combination of needle-size changes, short rows, and decreases/increases, you have a lot of flexibility in terms of adjusting the waist ribbing.

Needle size changes are often used to achieve simple shaping without actually increasing or decreasing stitches. Use a larger needle for the places you want the sweater to be bigger, and a smaller needle size for the places where you want the sweater to be smaller. In the Flutter, Pam works the bottom section in size 6, switches to size 3 for the waist, and then goes back to size 6 for the bust and shoulders. Smaller gauge, smaller waist. Note that Pam combines changing the needle size with standard waist increases and decreases for an even more dramatic curvy shape. Clever!

Adjustments: For a larger waist, switch to a size 4 or 5 instead of a 3, depending on your gauge. (Yes, this means you have to swatch carefully, but then you knew swatching would work its annoying little self into this somehow.) Or, for less dramatic waist curves, work the entire waist section in the same size needle as the body--you'll still get curves, because of the increases and decreases, but they will be more gentle curves.


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Comments

BethP wrote
on Dec 11, 2008 8:59 AM
I cannot analyze why, exactly, but This sweater looks good on everybody, and it looks fantastic on Debbie and Laura, two different figure types. For the first time, I do not envy Bertha. This pattern is a winner. These galleries are one of your best ideas ever. It is also interesting to see this sweater worn over different tops.
JackieL wrote
on May 23, 2008 4:28 PM

I love this, I plan to make it in three colors!

Jackie l