Knitted Accessories

.
The Side Slip Cloche from
Boutique Knits by Laura Irwin
.
"The only thing that separates us from the animals is our ability to accessorize."
—Clairee, played by Olympia Dukakis, in the movie
Steel Magnolias

This well-known quote is funny, but true! We love our accessories, and as knitters, we love to make them ourselves. If sweaters are the staples of a knitter's wardrobe, knitted accessories are the embellishment. Knit accessories are the fun in your wardrobe-and in your knitting bag.

I like to have an accessory project on the needles all the time so I can take a break from sweater knitting, and accessories travel better than big sweater projects.

Whether it's a knitted scarf, knitted mitts, or a hat knitting pattern, we love our accessory knitting! The bonus is that since these projects are small, it's fun to try a new technique, such as a lace scarf, a cabled hat, or some Fair Isle Mitts.

Many knitted accessories are one-skein projects, too, and in today's economy, we could all use a couple of one- or two-skein projects, right? You can also "shop your stash" to find yarn for many of these patterns.

Below are some wonderful knitted accessory patterns and some knitting techniques that will help you make them!

The Perfect Cabled Hat Knitting Pattern

.
Snowball Hat
.

Shop Knitted Accessory Resources

Knitscene Accessories 2012

144 pages of 35 knitted accessories and knitting how-to articles.

LEARN MORE

Interweave Knits Accessories 2011

40 accessories patterns to knit including socks, scarves, hats, & mittens!

LEARN MORE

Interweave Knits Holiday Gifts 2011

Delight in quick knits for men, women, children, and the home.

LEARN MORE

Download the
Mariposa Mitts pattern
______________

Shop All Knitted Accessory Patterns!

.

The Snowball Hat is such a cute hat, and a wonderful first cable project. It can be knitted as a beanie or with a giant pom-pom "snowball" on top.

All you need to know is how to knit in the round and how to knit rop cables. If you need a refresher course, here's a quick tutorial:

The Basic Cable

The most familiar type of cable is a simple rope cable. A rope cable is worked over a set number of stitches that are (usually) worked in a straight column, without moving over background stitches to the right or left.

The cable strands are most often made of stockinette stitch (knit on right side, purl on wrong side), which tends to come forward when viewing the right side of the work. The background is usually worked in reverse stockinette stitch (purl on right side, knit on wrong side), which tends to recede when viewed from the right side. The flanking areas of reverse stockinette stitch make the central stockinette-stitch cable pop forward in high relief.

       
The actual cabling in a rope cable couldn't be simpler. At predetermined intervals, and usually while working a right-side row, half the strand stitches are placed out of sequence before knitting. Cable instructions and chart keys often direct you to do something like "place two stitches onto a cable needle, hold in front, knit two, knit two from the cable needle." This means that you use a third, smaller cable needle to hold half the strand's stitches out of the way, knit the former second half of the strand first, then knit the former first half of the strand. Doing so switches the order of the two halves, making them pass over one another and creating a cable crossing.

If you hold the first half of the stitches to the front of the work while you knit the second half, you will have a left cross, where the first half of the cable passes over the second.

If you hold the first half of the stitches to the back of the work while knitting the second half, you will have a right cross, where the first half of the cable passes under the second. Rope cables typically repeat the same cross direction over and over for a continuous twist that resembles a rope.

Source: Eunny Jang, Interweave Knits, Winter 2011

The Perfect Lace Scarf Knitting Pattern

The Spectrum Scarf is a great beginning lace project. Color blending with multiple strands of ultra fine—and ultra soft—alpaca yarn shades this lacy scarf achieved with a simple one-row lace repeat.

Whether you're a beginning lace knitter or an advanced lace knitter, here's a fabulous technique that will get you back on track if you make a mistake, which is so easy to do in lace knitting!

How to Use a Lifeline

.
Spectrum Scarf

A lifeline is a temporary thread inserted through a row of stitches that serves as a checkpoint if you need to rip out and redo several rows. Here's how to make a lifeline:

1) Decide on a lifeline row. A good choice is an unpatterned "rest row," which is defined as a plain knit or purl row that usually occurs at the beginning or end of a pattern repeat.

2) After completing the designated row, thread a fine, smooth thread (crochet thread or embroidery floss works well) in a contrasting color onto a tapestry needle and run it through the bottom of each stitch on the needle, but not through any markers. Pull the lifeline thread out on each side of the row, leaving tails at least 6" hanging down on each side. When you resume knitting, be careful not to knit the lifeline into the new stitches you make.

With luck, you'll never need to use the lifeline. But if you discover a mistake, remove the knitting needle and ravel down to the lifeline thread. With a smaller size knitting needle, pick up stitches along the lifeline thread by inserting the needle tip through each stitch held by the lifeline; follow the lifeline thread to pick up all the stitches in the original marked row so that they are mounted on the needle properly. Do not remove the lifeline. Count the stitches to be sure that you have the number you should have on the designated lifeline row. Then resume knitting with the original size needles.

When beginning a lace pattern, some knitters place lifelines between each lace repeat until they've become comfortable with the pattern.

Preventing Mistakes

Practicing a few good habits will make it easy to work even the trickiest lace pattern.

• Be sure that you can easily read and keep your place in the instructions. Enlarge charts and, if necessary, transcribe texts or charts into terminology or symbols that work for you.

• Use a magnetic strip, ruler, or Post-it just above the row you are working. Doing so helps your eyes focus on that row while it allows you to check previously knitted rows as a reference point.

• Create good working conditions: increase lighting, minimize distractions, and avoid knitting when you are tired.

• Check your work often: count stitches, use markers liberally, place lifelines, and visually compare your knitting against any available charts and sample photographs.

• Read the pattern out loud as you work through the lace repeat the first few times. Simultaneous seeing, hearing, and doing can be helpful.

Source: Jackie Erickson-Schweitzer, Interweave Knits, Summer 2006

The Perfect Fair Isle Mitten Knitting Pattern

    
White Witch Mittens

Mittens are wonderful knitted accessories, and they make perfect gifts. Try your hand a Fair Isle knitting with the White Witch Mittens. And if you need a little tutorial on Fair Isle knitting, here you go!

Fair Isle

Fair Isle, or color stranding, is the technique of multi-colored knitting in which yarns that are not in use are carried loosely across the back of the work. In traditional Fair Isle, just two colors are used per row. The colors are changed frequently, and diagonal pattern lines dominate over vertical lines to distribute the tension more evenly over the knitted fabric.

Fair Isle is worked most efficiently if the two yarns are help simultaneously; one in the left and worked in the Continental method, the other in the right hand and worked in the English method. Although this may feel awkward at first, it is well worth the effort because it allows for uniform stitches and rapid knitting.

Preventing Tangles
You can prevent the two balls of yarn from tangling around each other as you knit by always stranding the right-hand yarn over the left-hand yarn and the left-hand under the right-hand yarn. Do not twist the strands on the back.

Preventing Puckers
In multicolor knitting, the stitches will pucker if the strands are pulled too tightly across the back. To prevent this, spread the stitches on the right-hand needle to their approximate gauge each time you change colors, rather than allowing them to scrunch up near the tip of the needle.

Source: The Knitter's Companion by Vicki Square, Interweave, 2006

Resources

Get the original Interweave Knits Accessories 2009 issue, now available for digital download!

Interweave Knits Accessories is a special issue with up to 60+ projects. Filled with accessories galore to warm your extremities--hats, scarves and wraps, socks, mitts and gloves, this is a compilation of our favorite knitting accessories. These favorite projects are both seasonal and year-round, timeless in design, and wearable for young and old alike. And there's more: From simple how-to get started techniques through quick finishing tips, this issue will be a handy reference for great accessories now and for many years to come.

Download Digital Edition

Find a knitted accessory for any occasion (or no occasion at all!) right here at Knitting Daily. In addition to patterns, we also offer expert tips and ideas to help you make your knitted accessories uniquely you!

 


Filed under:

Related Posts

  • The weather is warming up and it's time to plan some small projects for the summer. None of us wants a big wool sweater piling up in our laps as we knit! I don't know about you, but I knit year-round; I just change the type of projects I work
    Read More >>
  • Julia Farwell-Clay's Icelandic Star Cowl from Knitscene Accessories 2013 Last winter, Knitscene Assistant Editor Louisa Demmitt knitted a beautiful wrap—Julia Farwell-Clay's Icelandic Star Cowl from Knitscene Accessories 2013. It's a
    Read More >>
  • Box Pleat Scoop Neck from knit.wear I got a brand new copy of knit.wear in the mail yesterday. As always, it's full of simple, elegant, fashion-forward designs that are fun to knit and easy to wear. The Box Pleat Scoopneck by Jennifer Dassau, shown
    Read More >>
  • Eileen Lee's Red Poppy Cowl was inspired by a red crepe-paper poppy that her grandmother wore on her coat. The poppy was to honor Eileen's grandfather, a WWI veteran. In a nod to Christian Dior's 1954 pronouncement that red is "the color
    Read More >>
  • To experiment with different materials, cast on a number of stitches then switch between yarns to see what happens. If you keep the needle size and number of stitches the same it will remain a similar width. Keep experimenting until you find a combination
    Read More >>
  • Last week I finished Julia Farwell-Clay's Icelandic Star Cowl from Knitscene Accessories 2013 . I feel incredibly proud of myself because I have not had great success with finishing projects since I started my job here in May. There are so many things
    Read More >>
  • Win a knitter's dream shopping spree with a $200 voucher to spend however you like at bergeredefrance.com ! Prize details: The prize is one voucher of a value of $200 to spend on Bergère de France's new online store, valid on all products
    Read More >>
  • MYTH #3: A GRAFTED ROW IS THE EQUIVALENT OF ONE PATTERN ROW (PART 1). *Note The written instructions for all the grafted stitch patterns referred to can be found at the end of the post. Most knitters who are familiar with Kitchener stitch wouldn't
    Read More >>
  • We're still accepting entries for the "Sock Knitter's Badge of Honor" button contest! Tell us what you'd wear on your lapel to show the world you're a sock knitter. We've had some terrific entries, and we can't wait to
    Read More >>
  • In the last couple of winters, I've worn more knitted cowls than regular scarves. Knitted cowls are quick projects, and you can use up small amounts of luxury yarns you might have in your stash. In our new free eBook, Knit Cowl Patterns Ideas: 5 Free
    Read More >>
  • We all struggle with our first knitting project, sometimes producing fantastic or horrible results. Here's marketing manager Annie Hartman Bakken, sharing her first knitting experience. Annie with her dog Edie modeling a vest Annie knit. A detail
    Read More >>
  • Ombré everything is in right now, and yarns are no exception. In Knitscene Fall 2013 , we round up a small selection of some of our favorite ombré yarns—you can see the yarns in their pristine form on page 6 of the fall issue. But
    Read More >>
  • The Slouch Hat by Simona Merchant-Dest If someone asked me to name my favorite knitted accessory , I'd be hard-pressed to choose. Some days I'd say scarves, some days I'd say mittens. Today, it's hats, because I have a fabulous hat pattern
    Read More >>
  • Rosemary Cardigan by Cassie Castillo Emma Welford's Praline Pullover Fabrication Pullover by Josie Mercier Knitscene magazine is entering a new phase, with a new editor, Amy Palmer. Her first issue at the helm is the upcoming Fall 2013 Knitscene
    Read More >>
  • Vaudeville Shawl by Grace Akhrem Amodda Socks by Rachel Coopey Knitted accessories are the icing on a knitter's cake. We might enjoy knitting sweaters in the cooler months of the year, but most of us have little goodies on our needles all year round
    Read More >>
  • It's the first week of April, which seems like the perfect time to talk about spring knitting styles! I've never been one to complain about warm weather knitting. I love making accessories, and linen and silk blends are some of my favorite fibers
    Read More >>
  • I think of knitted accessories as the precious gems in a knitter's jewel box. They're the cabled hats knit out of a smooth 100% merino wool, the cowl knit from luscious cashmere, the clutch adorned with sparkly beads, the lace shawl knit with
    Read More >>
  • Our new book, Scottish Knits , is so gorgeous that nothing I write can do it justice. Knitting star Martin Storey has designed sweaters, knitted accessories, socks, and even home decor, all in vivid colorwork and fantastic patterns. A picture tells a
    Read More >>
  • There are some things that just feel like winter. Making Crock Pot dinners, for example, or Kahlua and coffee. In knitting, it's alpaca yarn, Aran Sweaters, and felted items such as bags and slippers. Felted Daypack by Joy Doss Felted Knitted Slippers
    Read More >>
  • I just can't stop coming up with free eBooks for you! The latest is a reboot of Knitting A ccessories: 7 Free Patterns for Knitted Accessories . I've switched it up and put in some new patterns for you. I hope you like knitting accessories , because
    Read More >>
  • I'll admit it. I'm a sci-fi geek. I love all things sci-fi; I'm even a member of the group Nerdy Knitter's on Ravelry! I prefer space ships and time travel over dragons and fairies, though. I'm pretty sure I've seen every episode
    Read More >>
  • The Ladybug Headband from A Step-By-Step Guide to Knitting Cables with 4 Staff Favorite Patterns I recently finished a headband similar to the Ladybug Headband by Katy Ryan. I discovered that works really well as an ear warmer, too. It's great for
    Read More >>
  • Noémie fingerless mitts Tutu Slippers Gabrielle fingerless gloves The wind is blowing all of my maple tree leaves into the yard. The sun is out, though, so that makes it better, and I'm trying to think of raking as an exercise activity! Positive
    Read More >>
  • It's time for a new knit-along! I thought we'd do something a little different this time, so how about a sock knit-along? Here are four sock knitting patterns to choose from (click on the links for more information about the patterns); here they
    Read More >>
  • Knitters and crocheters rejoice! The new season of Knitting Daily TV is underway and airing on local Public Television stations nationwide. Join host Eunny Jang, editor of Interweave Knits magazine, and co-hosts Clara Parkes, Kristin Omdahl, and Shay
    Read More >>
  • Our premiere Knitscene Accessories issue has been so well-received, we're blushing! Thanks to everyone who has responded to the issue and been inspired to make knitted accessories. Eight patterns from Accessories in particular seem to be garnering
    Read More >>
  • Sapphire Toque Noémie Lace Mitts Tattoo Shawl New knitting books start to make an appearance this time of year, and one of Interweave's newest is French Girl Knits Accessories by the French Girl herself, Kristeen Griffin-Grimes. I've long
    Read More >>
  • The Overshot Mittens by Carol J. Sulcoski I know, I know, holiday knitting during the summer sounds ridiculous, but I'm sure some of you smart knitters have already started! If you have, you're ahead of me, that's for sure. Last year I decided
    Read More >>
  • Knitted accessories are always favorites—to knit, to wear, and to give. French Girl Knits ' author Kristeen Griffin-Grimes is back with a new book, French Girl Knits Accessories . And oh, la, la, is it fabulous! Here are Kristeen's ideas
    Read More >>
  • Last year, Lisa and I produced the first Interweave magazine focused solely on knitted accessories. We loved working on Interweave Knits Accessories , so we were excited to put our own Knitscene spin on the issue this year. Stylish and simple accessories
    Read More >>
  • Yep, it's time for a new knit-along! Are you ready to vote for your favorite? Here are the choices: The Orbs Cowl by Robin Ulrich is hot off the presses in the new issue of Knitscene Accessories . I love the drape of this cowl, and bonus—it's
    Read More >>
  • As in, "the best things come in little packages." Knit gloves , mitts, bags, and even a bookmark are all little lovelies that make a big impact. I've chosen four knitted accessories, all from Jane Austen Knits , that are perfect for summer
    Read More >>
  • This month, we're debuting a brand new special issue-- Knitscene Accessories . You can check out the full preview here , and order or download the issue here and here (respectively). The photography for this super-sized issue took place along the
    Read More >>
  • Houndstooth Bonnet by Wendy Bernard God's Eye Mitts by Alexis Winslow Equilibrium Cowl by Carolyn Kern West Side Socks by Mary Lycan A note from Kathleen: I've seen knitted accessories all over the place, in stores here at home, boutiques I visit
    Read More >>
  • Frederica Shawlette by Susanna IC Camden Place Cardigan by Marianne Hobart Middleton Waistcoat by Kristi Schueler A note from Kathleen: My sister is back from a year in Egypt. Hooray! She and I share a wonderful relationship that reminds me of Jane Austen
    Read More >>
  • Make tweed with beads! From Pop Knitting by Britt-Marie Christoffersson Fabulous knitwear designer Britt-Marie Christoffersson's book Pop Knitting is full of fantastic (and fantastical!) ideas for color knitting. She also includes interesting knitted
    Read More >>
  • It seems like cowls are everywhere today, in stores and on the needles. I can see why they're popular—they're useful, quick to knit, and they're often one-skein wonders. A knitting trifecta if I've ever seen one. Knitted cowls can
    Read More >>
  • I'm a handbag collector. I come by it honestly because my gramma and my mom paved the way for me (and my sister!). Just last week my mom and sister came over and we spread out all of our handbags on my dining room table and held The Big Seasonal Handbag
    Read More >>
  • A note from Kathleen: My trusty UPS gal brings me so many gifts—I feel my heart rate speed up at the sounds of her delivery truck pulling up to the curb. The latest is the Spring 2012 Knitscene. My friend Lisa Shroyer is the editor of the magazine
    Read More >>
  • The Cambridge Jacket by Ann Budd is the perfect way to add some tangerine to your life! I hope you all had a fabulous Christmas! I did, and now I'm looking forward to celebrating the new year. I can't believe it's going to be 2012. I remember
    Read More >>
  • Ornati Gloves from Connie Chang Chinchio's new book, Textured Stitches I prefer gloves over mittens, and handknit gloves over commercially knitted gloves, of course! My hands are small, particularly in the finger area, so handknit gloves are perfect—I
    Read More >>
  • Modeling my Semolina Hat, from Weekend Hat s (I'm not the best hat model; I swear this is a cute hat!) There's a lot of talk this time of year about gift knitting: "What are you knitting for people this year? I'd like a knitted _____
    Read More >>
  • Bromeliad Cable by Lisa Shroyer I can't believe it's that time again, can you? I usually make knitted gifts for my family for Christmas, but this year, I just don't know if I'll have time. How many knitted scarves or hats do my family
    Read More >>
  • Zigzag Scarf by Debbie Bliss, from Knits Accessories When the kids go back to school I start thinking about fall knitting, and when I start thinking about fall knitting, I think about holiday knitting. And when I think about holiday knitting, I think
    Read More >>
  • Our biggest Gifts issue ever is coming your way! Interweave Knits Holiday Gifts 2010 has more than 60 projects to knit for family, friends, and home, as well as tips to make holiday knitting easier.
    Read More >>
  • The Paisley Hat by Vicki Square (available as part of Knitting Creative Details: Designing Original Knitwear with Vicki Square) I didn't used to fancy myself a designer. I've done a few designs for Knitting Daily—a cowl, a hat, and a pair
    Read More >>
  • The Vacation Scarf I spent last week camping in paradise, a.k.a. Yellowstone National Park. I went with a friend and we had so much fun seeing wildlife (bears, wolves, coyotes, moose, elk, pronghorn, and lots of bison!). I brought along some knitting—a
    Read More >>
  • I was in Los Angeles a couple of years ago for a big book fair. I had a rental car and a GPS, too, so I took a couple of adventures to see some sights. One of my excursions was to the fabulous and amazing Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical
    Read More >>
  • Today on Knitting Daily we're debuting our new free eBook, Knitting Instructions: 7 Free Knitting Patterns for Knitting Accessories ! I'm excited about this free knitting pattern collection because I love knitting accessories! It's great to
    Read More >>
  • A note from Kathleen: I'm always inspired by each new issue of PieceWork magazine, and the November/December issue doesn't disappoint. It hits newsstands on November 3, and I think there are some projects in there that will have you running to
    Read More >>
  • Have you heard of knitting with a knitting pin or with your yarn around your neck? You'll have to see it to believe it, and lucky for us we have a video of today's guest blogger, Andrea Wong, who is on a mission to share with North American knitters
    Read More >>
  • Note from Sandi: Get your needles ready, because it’s time for the Knits Spring 2009 Preview ! And here to give us a tour of the new issue is the editor of Interweave Knits herself, Eunny Jang. Me, I don’t do New Year’s resolutions.
    Read More >>
  • Today, we continue our behind-the-scenes look at last week's Season 2 tapings of Knitting Daily TV with more from Jaime Guthals: One of the best parts of my job as segment producer is finding your versions of some of our most popular patterns and
    Read More >>
  • Note from Sandi : I was talking about quilts as inspiration for knitting yesterday, and wow! Sounds like a lot of you out there are quilt-lovers, too. Did you know that Interweave's Fall Piecework Magazine has a special section of quilts, including
    Read More >>
  • Drop-Stitch Shrug So you have a cute little sundress, say, and you’re planning on wearing it out to dinner next week, but it gets chilly in the evening. You don’t want to completely cover up the neckline, because that’s one of the best
    Read More >>
  • It took a wardrobe malfunction for me to fully appreciate the power, the beauty, and the sheer usefulness of the humble garment called a shrug. Prior to the unfortunate malfunction, I had scorned shrugs as being something devised by an evil waif queen
    Read More >>